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I don't think so.
All the stuff I have in bags is soft.
Pot Metal is brittle.
Maybe mine is just old technology stuff.
If I recall, it melted sooner than solder.

If they went with pot metal, great!
 

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Larry Heggert won't tell you. Proprietary information. You could call the folks at Ozark and ask them.You cannot use it near a heat source like live steam. I know it is fairly low since I have remelted some broken parts and spures to make some of my own castings. It isn't pewter, but in that neighborhood.
N
 

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I tried to solder one of the link couplers that had opened up and it melted to a blob at the soldering iron's touch.
 

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Hummm, guess I won't be adding those leave springs I got from them to my Ruby since they're really close to that steam pipe.
 

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Posted By Dwight Ennis on 12/17/2008 8:05 AM
I'm asking the question because I'm going to need to bake some paint, and I don't want the coupler pocket to melt. I found this table[/b][/b] which lists several alloys, the lowest of which melts at 140*C. I need to bake the paint at 175*F.


Well...I can't imagine any metal melting at 175*F...or even getting soft. ****, if you cook meat at that temperature, you'll need a LOT of BBQ sauce...and a lot of time...cause ribs are the only thing I know that respond to such low heat.

Why don't you test one Ozark coupler pocket in your oven if you're still concerned..or boil one. I gotta believe that the metal on a live steam loco gets up to that 175*F temperature range anywhere around the boiler...and much higher around the firebox and smokebox. If you have one of those IR thermometer [e.g. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=93984 ] why don't you measure the temperature on the various parts of the engine the next time you run it.
 

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Guys,

Try this website for information on metals and their melting points.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood's_metal

There is a metal called Wood's metal that melts at 158 degree F . It is also known as Cerrobend and has been used for casting parts for O Scale and HO Scale model train use for years. You could melt this product in boiling water and yes it has been done. I have some on hand now for project .

Charles M SA # 74
 

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Cerrobend is great for filling tubing to bend it without collapsing the tubing and then melt the Cerrobend out and have nice bent tubes.
 

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I would have thought it was some sort of tin/lead alloy since they are the cheapest???? Most Bismuth alloys like cerro are expensive!!! Generally speaking most tin/lead alloys have a melting point of about 475 deg F. I cast in lead free Britannia (92 tin -7.5 antimony-.5 copper) which can be soldered with low melt solder like "TIX".

BTW, monikers like "Pot Metal" and "Pewter" are pretty general.

Jack
 

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Richard, so long as the steam pipe doesn't actually touch the casting, you'll be fine. I've got an Ozark number plate on the smokebox of one of my steamers. It's a pot boiler, so the smokebox doesn't get near as hot as on a butane-fired loco, but it's held up nicely. Roundhouse uses a fair amount of some kind of white metal castings on their steamers. I've also used plastic and other things that many would say you shouldn't use with live steam. (Heck, look at Aristo's steamers!) So long as they're not in contact with the major heat sources (boiler, smokebox, cylinders) you should be fine.

Later,

K
 

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There is no specific answer as the metal used by Ozark is not the same for all the products. Some parts require a more brittle alloy that can take more heat.

John
 

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It always has appeared to be some form of pewter to me. Pewter melts in the range of 450-550 degrees. Pewter is primarily tin and is lead free.
 
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