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Occasionally we get some failry severe weather in central Alabama, such as mis-directed huricanes and such.

I would like to have the railroad raised up about 20", but I am worried that if this is bench design it won't won't stay in place in the situation of high winds.

Having the layout within 1 foot of the average terrain probably makes more sense but it means a lot more work on hands and knees.

How well have various railroads faired during ugly weather?

Any recommendations?

Tom Bray
 

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Tom Ruddell had a line down in Dothan that I know survived a few storms!

for some of his archived post look here:
http://archive.mylargescale.com/forum/search.asp?mode=DoIt&MEMBER_ID=156

I think he has taken up or moved the line to somewhere else, last I heard he was wanting to move to NC?

here is a short description of his line:

he Bethlehem Central Railroad is an almost exclusively Aristo-Craft layout with more than 1,700 feet of track. A 24x36 building is devoted to freight and passenger yards along with a workshop, and there are two rail linesâ€"a point to point line with loops at either end and a continuous loop that's partly double and partly triple-tracked. The lines connect at "Bethlehem Junction," a 40-foot-long elevated platform with eight tracks. Rolling stock includes a 35-car freight train headed by an A-B-B-A diesel lashup and double-headed Pacifics hauling eight heavyweight cars. In 2002, the railroad evolved into a ministry based on discovering God's Word in modern, everyday life. Private and home-school classes as well as various youth and adult Christian groups enjoy testing their Bible knowledge through the Westwood Garden Railway Bible Challenge. The Bethlehem Central also helps Boy Scouts earn their merit badges in railroading.

You may also want to try to look him, or members of the RR Group that live down that way.

here is an old email addy I found, I have no idea if it's valid.
contact Tom at [email protected]

good luck!

cale
 

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What type of bench are you thinking of? If is dirt covered, like Richard Smith's, whose method I copied with mine, there should be too much mass given the width of the bench to create any problem. We get winds up to 50 sometimes here in the valley and I have not had any problems except for tree branches and leaves. I think you run a higher risk from flying debris than the bench work lifting.
 

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Tom

just got a note back from Tom...below is a portion that may interest you.

"So, the BCR is alive and well, although I'm still catching up on about 10 months of deferred maintenance.


The railroad survived a massive lightning strike in 2003 or so (can't remember now) and I wrote an article on lightning protection for Garden Railways. In 2006, a tornado passed right over us and the railroad was unscathed (but there was a huge mess to clean up) and Dan. Harrison's railroad to the west of us survived the tornado that killed nine in the Enterprise High School which was this area's worst storm in decades."

the above email link worked!

cale
 

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The raised parts of our club railway has survived for years through windstorms, long snowy winters, heavy spring and falls rains.

The largest free standing portions are Nelson Yard and the Glen Hammond Bypass.




The raised structures are basically decks built with 2 x 6s on 4 x 4 posts in cement post blocks resting on patio stones. As Nick pointed out these structures are too heavy to lift, unless you get hit with a category 5 tornado. Then you have bigger things to worry about.

Other raised decks are beside the garage, fences, hedges and the house which protects them somewhat from high winds.
 

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Tom,

If built properly a raised benchwork railroad should hold up just as well as a deck would. As Nick said, flying debris and falling limbs would be the most likely to cause damage and that would be to structures or track on top of the benchwork and not likely the benchwork itself. We get a bit "breezy" at times here on the Oregon coast and I've experienced no damage at all thus far (I use a nominal 40" height). Just build the benchwork and plant the legs using the common practices for building a deck in your area and you shouldn't have any major problems unless there's a wind strong enough to blow the deck off the back of your or your neighbor's house. Then all bets are off as possibly will be your roof. ;)
 
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