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Dan,
It's a store that started out as a consignment store. Now they specialize in bidding on leftover estate items, after the family takes what it wants. They clear the house and sell what they can. Goodwill gets some stuff. Quite a variety of stuff, she specializes in books, but you can never tell what you may find. Stumbled across the oil pump, not sure how long it had been there. I had not been there for awhile.

Greg
Not sure how to measure the current draw? I have a multi-meter, can use it to do that?
 

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That is a neat oil pump. I bought a oil pump at Marty's. Don't know what I am going to do with it in the desert.


Mabey put it next to a old water tank as a water pump from the days of steam.
 

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Jerry, put the multimeter on the amps scale, the highest one you have, and then put it in series with the positive lead from the battery, i.e. from the battery to the plus lead of your meter, then the minus lead to the wire that used to go to the battery plus. I would gues the motor draws 1/2 amp or less. (That would be 500 milliamps).

Regards, Greg
 

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Yep! And most meters have a small fuse to protect the meter in case of overload, and they are usually a pain to replace.

A 1 amp or higher scale is the place to start if you meter has it. I would recommend everyone to have a meter that can read at least 5 amps for large scale.

Regards, Greg
 

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1st paycheck I ever got, $18.75 (in 1962), I took to Graham Electronics in Indianapolis, IN and bought a Simpson Multimeter (VOM is what we called them back then, although my Dad called it a "VoltOhmist"). It WAS a great meter for $18.75. I used it for nearly 45 years, never a problem, always accurate. Only thing I ever had to do to it was replace the Ohm meter battery ("C"-cell) once every 4 to 8 years.

A couple of years ago, my Son-in-law requested help figuring out how to install a GFCI outlet in the kitchen in the house they were renting... the wiring was really old and had 4 same color wires coming into the outlet box and he lost track of which went where on the old socket he had just removed.

I brought my trusty Simpson and did some quick measurements and it was just plain weird. The fuse was pulled so I was using the Ohm meter. Three of the wires seemed to be shorted together. I tried a different outlet and got the same thing.

What was that Red Green said about calling your Father-in-law and what "he" (i.i.: me) would do to a project!


Went to another outlet and KABOOM!

The needle is now the shape of a question mark ("?") and the innards of the rest of it are a chared mass.
The po' lil' o' fuse is even worse.

That outlet was on a different fuse circuit and I had just put the meter leads across 120V.


 
G

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Does said Son-in-law get to buy new meter. Being said you still can get good ones on eBay from time to time. Just sold one!!!!
Toad
 

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The Son-in-law isn't the one that was so stupid as to just stick the probes in the unknown socket without first checking for VOLTAGE! (He was smart enough to call his wife's father to score points with her!)

After it happened, I hunted and hunted for a Simpson like it (can't remember the model number right now), but found nothing like it. I need to google it now and see what comes up.

Now I have a DMM (Digital Multi-Meter) that can send data to my PC fast enough to use like a audio frequency oscilloscope.

Still, though, I didn't need to have a PC with me to see low frequency noise... I could just tell by "knowing" how the needle reacted. Yeah, I still miss that ol' meter!
 

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Just out of curiosity, shouldn't the counterweights be rotated 180 degrees from their current location? Unless the extra mass is being used as "oomph" to help lift the oil in the pipe, I would think that they would be more useful as counterweights if they were opposite the crank on the shaft.
 
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