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So I'm intending on using NWSL wheels on my Fn3 locos and rolling stock. I'd really like to use their fine scale wheels (they're the same tread width as regular O scale wheels) and on Llagas Creek track. I asked LC if they had any experience with this and they told me no, but as long as the tread is greater than 2mm it should run just fine. The tread on the wheels should measure out to above 3mm, so it should be fine, but I was wondering if anyone here had any real world experience with them?
 

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Outdoor or indoor layout? Usually with fine scale it will be the small flange that will cause problems. They will not run well on track that is not near perfect. They look good but practical, maybe not.
 

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It will be outside for sure, do the flange problems apply to all tread styles/sizes? Or is it the fine scale wheels mainly? My track will surely not be "perfect" as I'm modeling in NG and want it to act somewhat realistic.
 

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Well Aristo designed their trains to run on their flanges through switches, to prevent wheel drop.
Thinner treads give you less rail head to ride, so plan on hand laying all your switches and fine tuning each one every time you go through a hot/ cold cycle as the rail will move with contraction/expansion.
Out doors we are more susceptible to physics than your old N in a controlled environment.
Has anyone mentioned the 10' rule to you yet? Many feel that if you can't see it at 10 feet away, why bother?

Welcome to the forum,
John



Thanks I'll delete the false info and shall refrain from spreading it...
 

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A prototypical wheel tread for narrow gauge equipment will be around 5 - 6" wide. The NWSL .270" wide wheel treads scale out very well for this. I wouldn't use anything narrow than that. The flanges on those wheels are .100" deep, which will be fine for outdoor use. Those are similar dimensions to the wheels used under Accucraft's and Bachmann's 1:20 equipment.

Later,

K
 

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Actually, the Aristo frogs were not meant to be flange bearing frogs if you have good flanges at the depth Kevin mentions.

The #6 switch frog flangeways are exceptionally deep, there is not a G scale train that would be flange bearing in this switch. In fact there were aftermarket shims to lessen the frog flangeway depth.

On their wide radius (10' diameter) switches, the flangeway depth depends on which version you have. Indeed early versions were not deep enough and did not meet NMRA standards, but later versions (John must have the early versions) have flange depths in excess of 3 mm, which is greater than the 0.1" recommended and mentioned by kevin.

I won't comment on the Aristo 4' diameter switches, they are junk.

If you do happen upon older Aristo WR switches they are easy to modify, see my site.

Greg

p.s. with narrower tread wheels, you may have to also shim the stock rail flangeway widths, see my site also for suggestions on how to easily address this.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok, thanks for the responses guys!
Total: The 10 foot rule sounds like the 3 foot rule in N.

EBT: Ok, that makes sense. Also makes the choice easy (I can be quite the rivet counter in N scale).

Greg: Good info! I'm going to be working with Llagas Creek track exclusively just to make things easy for me, plus, I like the idea of using the nickel silver.
 

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It will be outside for sure, do the flange problems apply to all tread styles/sizes? Or is it the fine scale wheels mainly? My track will surely not be "perfect" as I'm modeling in NG and want it to act somewhat realistic.
AK,

Paul is correct in his comments about fine scale wheels and flanges.
All of my 1:20.3 NG locomotives and rolling stock uses fine scale flanges on the wheels. I like the looks also. BUT I could never run this stuff on a garden layout on the ground without problems with derailing! That said, I have a friend who has an elevated layout built on a substantial solid frame work with SSV code 250 aluminum rail. My equipment runs on that layout without problems. I have also run my stuff at the Fairplex layout in Pomona, CA. without problems. But that track is LGB code 332 and is attached to a concrete base. Very rigid.
 

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Not trying to derail the thread, but could the guys with experience with finescale flanges weigh in on this question: Does having proper suspension affect how well the finescale wheels work (or don't)? I get the frog issue, but I was wondering how they tolerate uneven track work otherwise.
 

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Burl, I've got an EBT caboose with Rich Yoder finescale trucks under it. The wheels look great, but the truck was definitely too rigid for outdoor use. I replaced the springs with softer ones so the trucks are now fully sprung and can flex over uneven track. The finescale flanges now track as well as my deeper ones. The trick is having the weight on the car to compress the springs ever so slightly so that all 4 wheels are always in contact with the rail. I don't know that I'd trust an entire fleet of cars with finescale flanges, but then again if one works, it stands to reason more would as well. If I were made of money, I'd maybe give it a shot. Then again, if I were made of money, I'd have a lot more live steamers to buy first. ;)

Later,

K
 
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