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Discussion Starter #1
About 12 months ago I heard a rumour of a friend of a friend selling some G scale items, curiosity got the better of me and I made a couple of phones calls and a couple of car trips and I purchased a few LGB locos and a small selection of Bachmann and LBG rolling stock.

I have been in model railways for many years in the form of HO. But have always loved the concept of running trains out side, so the purchase of this small lot was very exciting.

My current long term goal is, have a garden with a railway through it, not a railway in the garden. A small narrow gauge steam loco making its way through the garden with some simple yards, and at the end of the day I would like to be able to just roll all the locos and rolling stock into a shed out of harms way.

I would consider myself a serious HO modeller, not quite a rivet counter! The G scale will be different; anyone who pops around can run the G scale, it will be fun for everyone!

That’s the plan, let’s see how I go! I have joined to learn more about garden railways and I will help share modelling techniques in HO applicable for large scale.

Nice to meet you

Alan
 

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Nice to meet you, Alan!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys,

I plan to do heaps of reading, the modelling I’m okay with, but putting a railway outside in the elements which is reliable and lasts will be a challenge, but fun!
 

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Welcome out of the basement :D
 

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welcome steam5!


You've joined a select group of wealth losers.


When building a garden railroad, there's a rule of thumb that will help you plan your expenditures:
Dig a hole in the ground, throw all your money into it, then cover it up. No, it won't grow.
Also, when you have made some progress in realizing your outdoor RR dream, you'll probably want to add a pond. In that case, dig the same hole, but it make it twice as big. The throw all your money and then some into the hole, etc.


Good luck! :D


Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Pete, I had a look over your site, that very close to what I’m after! It looks great! What do you use for control, DC, DCC, batteries…?

Basement... I wish! In Australia we don’t really have them! I get so jealous when I read layout articles in Model railroader, they have a massive climate controlled basements.

Mark! Ha-ha very true! I have found that in HO as well, but you and I both know and everyone else here knows we love the hobby and would not give it up!
 

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Thanks, Alan.

Each loco has a battery car (disguised as an ordinary piece of rolling stock) behind it, with a 7.2v nicad pack inside -- the RC car kind. I slow charge the batteries overnight, get tons of run time, and can swap them between all the units. I tried track power but my four-wheel locos and harsh climate meant too many problems. I tried R/C, too, but it didn’t suit me. I like to watch trains; not play with them. Therefore, all my locos are controlled by simple switches that provide three forward speeds and two reverse (by rotating the smoke stack for example) with stop in the middle. That's just right for the amount of shunting I do, which normally means backing up, coupling to a car or two, running around in circles, then backing up and uncoupling.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Pete and Jerry,

I was hopping to continue the DCC in the garden, but I plan to use some battery locos, so if all else fails I can still run trains!

On DCC, I just have to work out if I want to spend the time keeping the track clean, maybe a battery loco could help me out with the track cleaning.

Alan
 

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Steam5

Welcome to large scale railroading. I run R/C-battery control and just straight battery control. It didn't take me long to realize I didn't want to clean track all the time. I live in San Diego which has a climate similar to Australia in many ways. Even so, I live close enough to the coast that the marine layer and fog still messes with running track power.

I use Airwire 900 for some locos ( and my Bachmann track truck). Those are installed inside the locos and bed of the truck. I also use a system similar to the R/C car guys with the unit and batteries in a trailing car. Lastly, I also have a battery car with a simple DPDT center off switch that contains just batteries and the switch. I can plug them into any of the locos I want and then the train just goes until the batteries die, but gives the option of forward and reverse as well as center off.

I also use a variety of battery types. 1. battery packs containing 12 volts worth of NiMh AAs. 2. 7.2 volt R/C car batteries, and sometimes 3. just 9 volt batteries. Most last several hours before recharging. All are NiMh batteries.

All my locomotives run on no more than 12 volts or 14.4 volts (2 of those 7.2volt race car R/C batteries). Use batteries with the most amphres you can find. Mine are 2500 to 3000. This gives a lot of running time.

Tom Rey
 

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Steam -- You're an EE, the electrical part of this should be easy! My only advice, other than to have fun, would be to start small but give yourself the room to expend as the urge hits. I've got about 130 feet of track and routine maintenance keeps me busy enough. My hats off to these guys with 1000+ feet -- taking care of that sounds more like a full-time job than a hobby.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Being an electrical engineer helps some times!

I agree, I’m currently taking small steps in garden railroading, I do hope to soon lay some track out side as a feasibility study and see how it all goes.

Alan
 

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Posted By MarkLewis on 06/23/2008 3:51 PM
welcome steam5!


You've joined a select group of wealth losers.


When building a garden railroad, there's a rule of thumb that will help you plan your expenditures:
Dig a hole in the ground, throw all your money into it, then cover it up. No, it won't grow.
Also, when you have made some progress in realizing your outdoor RR dream, you'll probably want to add a pond. In that case, dig the same hole, but it make it twice as big. The throw all your money and then some into the hole, etc.


Good luck! :D" border=0>


Mark



Man aint it the truth LOL
but hey Ya gotta love it
 
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