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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
over the past month I've been spending weekends out at Eric Ogundipay's house digging through boxes and parts and tring to help him get a shop built.
The basement and garage would not work so he picked a room other than his dinning room table and kitchen counter.

I think track lighting is the best to keep it out of your eyes and point them to the spot your working on w/o moving the project around.

first he needed a simple work bench that was handy to all his tools yet gave room for the large locos he bashes.
Note the bench you can roll from side to side and over to see the plans. the shelves above are for stock items and things easy for you to see.
I personally don't like closed cabnets ,I like to see and find things at a glance.

Next he need to keep all the projects in some kind of order. thus the shelves and plastic storage containers for screws and parts.


so see, you don't need anything fancy, just comfortable and handy to use when you have time.
 

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Wouldn't work for me. Wasting space is what I do best.
 

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I've found that since I use my Dremel tool almost exclusively with the flex shaft attached, I hang the motor unit from an upper shelf, allowing the flex shaft to hang down...
If I had it to do over again (and likely will), I'd wall mount a power strip just under the first shelf to allow for quick (and handy) access to juice for those little powered hand tools (like a Dremel or soldering iron), rather than having power cords snaking across the work surface.
Your not likely to be using all the outlets at the same time, so excessive draw shouldn't be a concern.
 

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If you look around the home improvement places, you will find 4' or 6' lengths of plugs. They are mounted in a metal strip with a cord at one end. There are plugs every 4 to 6 inches. You just mount the bar on the wall/shelf and you have a very long plug strip with a bunch of plugs.

plug strip example at Amazon
 

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I put one of those 5.5-ft long multi-plug strips on the fascia board under the front lip of my workbench. Lathe and Drill press and several lights with magnifying lenses all plug into the unit with the cords passed under the bench and up over the back to the tools and lights. There area several empty sockets for hand power tools and one master switch for the whole thing right under the right hand side of the workbench. (I don't use the switch with the tools running, but do use it to turn off one or two of the lights... I try to keep the power level down when using that switch to try to reduce damage to the switch.) The unit is plugged into a GFCI outlet that is on pretty much its own circuit breaker in the main power panel of the house.

I want a second one for my other work area with the mill, belt/disk sander, power hacksaw and their lights.

VERY handy!
 

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The power bars in my train shop are mounted high within easy reach of my drill press and desk. No crawling around on my hand and knees behind furniture looking for outlets.




I also mounted one on the back of my large work table so it would be easier to reach and plug in all the essentials: light, magnifier, solder iron, etc.

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
When we first moved here 10 years ago this was my corner in the old shop.


Heres all the room I had to build the MLS bridge


but after the new shop was built and the old one became just for trains.
I built the current bench


new shop in 2005 which is now full
 

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Hi Greg!

My workshop didn’t always look like this, but after visiting a friend’s shop a number of years ago I cleaned mine up. His wife had a new kitchen installed and he inherited all the old cupboards and countertops. With tube lighting, light coloured cupboards and counter tops; his shop was bright and clean. He had everything at his finger tips and knew where everything was. I was impressed, and began improving my own shop.

My desk and drill press stand are government surplus. They have steel frames, sturdy tops and lots of roll out drawers for tools and accessories. My large work table is also government surplus, but it does not have drawers. Two small, storage cabinets were bought and rolled underneath to hold all the tools I use most frequently. Two larger storage cabinets hold other tools and materials. Small storage cabinets are mounted on the wall above the work table to hold all the small parts and electronic components most frequently used.

One of my hot buttons is spending half an hour looking for a tool that I would use for five minutes. So everything was organized so I could always find them quickly. For the same reason everything is always put away after a work session. Anything left on the work surfaces would be inspected by curious felines when I wasn’t around. If it was small enough and could be batted around the floor, it would quickly become a toy until it disappeared out of reach under something.
 

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Yes, I know. It’s something I hear often about my shop.

My On30 crew enjoyed it though. Although I think the freshly baked muffins and brewed coffee may have had something to do with the perfect attendance over two winters.
 

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Is that pillow in the last picture so you do not hurt your head when you bash it against the wall?

I keep mine near the computer, where it is most needed!

Greg
 

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Good one.

The pillow is multifunction. Butt support, Train support / surgery support and finally head support after too much wine has been consumed
 

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GG:

Go you!

'Way back in the Dark Ages (1971) my wife and I moved into this brand new house. All we had was a mattress (young newlyweds) a coffee table to eat from, and one lonesome bookcase.

We ran Lionel all through that house. Dual track down the hallways branching off into the unused bedrooms, around the coffee table and under the bookcase--we loved it.

Kids came, priorities changed....

Les
 

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Posted By Les on 03/10/2009 4:28 PM
GG:

Go you!

'Way back in the Dark Ages (1971) my wife and I moved into this brand new house. All we had was a mattress (young newlyweds) a coffee table to eat from, and one lonesome bookcase.

We ran Lionel all through that house. Dual track down the hallways branching off into the unused bedrooms, around the coffee table and under the bookcase--we loved it.

Kids came, priorities changed....

Les












Heck Les, that would have been a HOOT... do you have any pics that you can share?

gg
 

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Nope.

It was a hoot. I sold my Richoflex to pay some bills. And two of my guns. We agreed the 12 ga, .22, and '06 were meat guns. And my 1st gen Colt was good home defense. (She shot that thing fairly well--enough to do good in a doorway.)

Heh. When we were going together, I used to carry it all the time, along with fencing tools, staples, wrenches, etc in one of these plain denim jackets with the blanket lining. While we were dating, she was out helping me on the farm and got cold, having dressed for other purposes. (Worked well on me. Yo, did it ever.) So I gave across my 'pig coat' which hadn't seen a washing machine in years. I wasn't sure whether the weight or the smell (she said the smell) staggered her, but she got under it and proceeded to go throught the pockets. Fence pliers. Wrench. Colt 44. She looked it over and put it back. Not a flicker of emotion. I thought, "What a cool woman. Didn't know they were like that."

But I have the best train pixes in the world: in my mind.

Fern (wife) had this 'thing' for me when I came home, one evening: a Lionel coal loader she got for five bucks. It worked just fine. Missing the roof, but I went to work and bent up a new one, piece 'o cake. She didn't know beans, but it said 'Lionel' so she haggled the guy down and got it. We got this huge kick out of running my 1948 Pennsy turbine with automatic coal car, cattle car/loader. Together, we eventually got everything Lionel, postwar, except the postal car: I wouldn't give the $25 they were asking. ****, that was nearly a quarter of a week's pay.

Next, I came home and she had five 2020's. Some were missing side rods. Found 'em at this used stuff place, looking for furniture. (Brides do that, for some reason: we had enough, my and her's cooking stuff... her ... what else could a man want?) Later, I found out. It ain't what he wants ... children are kinda scary, if you think about it.

Ah, well.
In for a dime, in for a dollar. Or a lifetime. Whatever. 38 years and counting.

Les

And, thanks for asking. Gave me an excuse to pull up some nice memories.
 

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Les, you make me feel good. Born in '54 not quite your gen however in todays world both you and I can remember those times.

Thanks for sharing this with me (us). I will be sure to share my world with you.

gg
 

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GG

Thank you for the kind reply. Sometimes ol' guys like me go away and live 'back then'. Glad you found it entertaining.

At our age, what's ten years?


Les
 
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