G Scale Model Train Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
911 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

Bruce Chandler built a model of the old Perkins Produce building which was the subject of an article in Model Railroader in 1974, and also a HO gauge kit.

Here is a link to that topic - http://www.mylargescale.com/Community/Forums/tabid/56/forumid/7/tpage/1/view/topic/postid/56296/Default.aspx#56296

Bruce re-named his to Salmons Produce. I e-mailed Bruce and received a file of the article – Thanks Bruce, and looked at it then scanned & enlarged the drawings: that showed it to it to be LARGE!

The measuring rule was found and brought into use to see what space would be available and I found that with some reduction I could fit it in, and also add a shortened additional ‘shed’. After all sorts of scribbles, a design emerged which deleted the sloping stone foundation/garage, and added a loading deck, and on top of that is the shortened ‘shed’ that comes from the Sept/Oct ’08 issue of the ‘Narrow Gauge & Shortline Gazette’ magazine article by Harry Brunk. The photo mentioned in that article (of part of the shed) is in the Poor’s book, and David Fletcher (Thanks David) provided a copy of that as well.

Planning permissions were sought for this building and after some mutterings/gasps (as to the size if it) it was reluctantly given.

That shortened ‘shed’ fitted onto a blank wall of the main building, and for good measure the ‘Board & Batten’ construction and a corrugated iron roof was kept. The idea is that the original was built earlier and that demand, and ‘trade’ required an extension, to the original building which was moved and rebuilt.

Fantasy now over time for construction: the main building is made from 5mm thick plastic corrugated sheet, and the shed/loading dock from 5mm thick PVC solid foam sheet. As usual a start was made on the windows first made from .5 and 1mm styrene strip, and when they were complete I, having reduced the length & width of the building, made the shell of the building. This has a series of internal braces and corner strengtheners, and when it was together I added on the side that was to have the new shed an internal outline of it on the exterior of the wall. There are originally no windows in this wall, the original plans had a loading door, hidden by the new extension, I later added a couple of small windows overlooking the sides of the shed. The huge, and sharply sloped (under) roof was added, from 2mm thick styrene card. After the main roof was complete I had decided to add a roof or attic door, again following Bruce Chandler’s model(s) where he has just such a door on his ‘Grist Mill’. This in turn meant I added a dormer window to admit light to the attic space. Onto the roof and at the level of the walls a dormer (yes another window was needed to be made!) was added. This was made as a separate unit and with the exception of the shingled roof was complete and painted before fixing to the main under roof.

The long chimney stack is made from 5mm PVC foam sheet, clad in terracotta colored .5mm styrene card for the bricks, cut and fitted one by one, after the carcass of the stack had been marked for where it was to fit into the roof, thorough a hole that was made for it. Under the roof the location of the stack is strengthened with scrap pieces, fitted when the completed stack has glued in position. I also fitted a set of pieces made from the aluminum sheet (from ‘pop’ cans), which are also used for the corrugated iron.

The main building roof in the article (for about 1930) had asphalt shingles, which were a bit late for my time so it was shingled using Richard Smith’s method. There are 29 rows per side! I use window and frame sealant for gluing these on and the same stuff seals the ends. This roof is big so to add some stiffening I also added the roof rafter ends: a bit fiddly but they did the trick. The front and back ends of the roof project even more, the have the large ‘end to end’ beams (from scrap) added and a simplified set of rafter ends as well. This is a ‘victorian’ building so a bit of fancywork was added – a different design for the roof peak – the plan version would not fit with the attic door, and some finials added as well.

One window has a stovepipe added to the lower section; the plan shows one 12” in diameter; I thought this a touch large: so a 4” one replaced it, made from 2 ‘bendy’ drinking straws, as I surmised that the draught was not good enough (shaded from some of the wind by the building) the photos show the new one.

The yellow is a ‘sand’ colored masonry paint, with the warm brown being an enamel paint. All is varnished later except the shingle roof which will have a coat of ‘Thompsons water seal’

The loading dock is mainly 5mm thick PVC sheet with a 3mm thick version for the deck itself. Onto this deck the shed is fitted when complete. There are two supposedly sliding doors – these are fixed and left slightly open to indicate this. The road side has an extra window for the office, and a stove pipe from here projects the roof. Battens are fixed on but where the sliding doors are these are replaced with faux metal(?) strips to give the clearance for the door to slide back. The rear of this building is for the trackside, and the front is the roadside

The roof is from ‘pop’ can aluminum sheets, cut to size, then annealed. This is necessary as my (paper) corrugator is not strong enough to work without it being done! They are then fixed to the roof with window and frame sealant, and then painted with masonry paint to ensure that any ‘still open’ ends of grooves are filled in. Then weather it so suit.
The two halves of the building are bolted together with captive bolts being fitted into the wall of the original building, these are glued in position from inside: the fixing nuts can be fitted on from underneath, for the top one a hole was cut into the loading deck inside the ‘shed’ to allow access to it



The large wagons will be the Schliech covered wagon which comes with a couple of horses, and some more ‘scratch built’ and smaller wagons for variety from the ‘Garden Railways plans.


Here are some photos of the building,. which is complete except for the signs which are not even designed yet! --



A virew over the extra 'shed'




the view from the other side, the figure is one of the 'Fine Folk' range, note the double bendy straw stovepipe.




A front view which is the 'road' side of the building






A final building is a double outhouse block, made from large scrap bits with another corrugated iron roof. That fits over a ‘plug’ on its foundation slab that will kkep it in position




a construction view, showing the annealing color of the pop can (actually Fosters lager, and no I don't drink the stuff, there are lots of cans discarded by teenagers, the difficult bit is getting them without creases!) annealing, done on our gas cooker.




I have made some crates to scatter round and here os a final photo of those, they are of various sizes, and have inside them variously colored blocks of ‘packaging polystyrene’ to roughly indicate fruit. This building may also be used for ‘provisions’ (yet another use for the extension) so some small crates and barrels may be added!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
580 Posts
Peter,

You have created one beautiful structure. I especially love the details, as you say "fancy work", under the roof overhangs. Keep them coming. Your work continues to provide excellent ideas for us builders.

Doc
 

·
Senior JOAT
Joined
·
736 Posts
Wow. That is so neat looking. It's really the same, but very different from my model. I sure do like all of those additions. That color really shows all the neat roof detail.

It looks like the same figure I used, but with a hat?

Nice work.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
687 Posts
A great looking model Peter ... I really like the small architectural details.

Between you and Bruce, you have given two marvellous interpretations of a produce building.

Regards ... Doug
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,001 Posts
Your usual excellent modeling for sure. It certainly captures the character of the original while maintaining an individuality of its own. A beautiful rendering from Bruce's fine work and wonderful details as well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
926 Posts
A great looking structure Peter. Gee, you seem to actually finish a project, unlike y.t. who is still laboring away on three that are in various stages of completion.

Question: how did you make the chimney? Or if it's ready-to-wear, whose is it?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,007 Posts
Nice job Peter. The weathering is especially good. I like the way you managed to make it look as if it were out in the open and lived in, but at the same time well maintained. I'm still striving to keep that balance in my weathering. I tend to get heavy handed once I start :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
926 Posts
Peter, after re-reding your original post, I learned how you made the chimney. But I'd still like to know, did you paste every one of a plastic zillion "bricks" onto the armature? If so, you are more patient (and more anal :) than mois!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
911 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Hi All,

Thank you for the kind comments, they are most appreciated!!

Joe accuses me of being 'Anal' I DO NOT have a clue as to what he means; the job needs to be done, I have not tried Precision sheets but have seen them and I do not think they would work for a stack like this from what I have seen of them, here in the UK we do not have the (special?) glue yet for sticking down the vac formed(?) sheets which I think will have hollows at the back, and thus will over time break - so its build your own!

So, what is done to get the stack done, - the brick strips are marked out with a pair of draftsman's dividers (its good to have a use for what is now defunct equipment, and I have 2 pairs in regular use), then the brick strips are cut accordingly into bricks (one reason for the second pair of dividers) from the strips, and they are glued down the go onto a layer of Evostik glue.

It takes longer to do the last part than writing it out! Your (and it will soon be trained) eye will assist you in getting the mortar gaps right as you go along, cut half bricks to suit as needed, and stacks need a lot of them, and the job is done in no time.

When dry fill the mortar gap with a yellow/gray acrylic paint and whisk any on the bricks off with your finger - it will provide the start of the weathering, add to that till you are satisfied - stack done!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
926 Posts
Peter, thanks for the explanation. As for the "a" word, I got it off the internets, which as we all know, were invented by Al Gore. :) As for the descriptive, it was meant as a compliment. Now if you Brits got with the program and learned English...:)
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top