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Our 1:20.3 modular group, Sundance Central, has been busy building six (6) new modules for our layout. The new 10' x 20' addition will be the yard for the layout. We are nearly complete with all the 110 feet of hand laid code 250 rail on metal tie plates on hand cut wood ties including 11 turnouts. The yard will include a scratch built Gallows turntable (44" diameter), scratch built two stall backwoods engine house with attached machine shop and covered work area. The new addition will be shipped to the 28th National Narrow Gauge Convention in Portland, OR this September for the show. It will be connected to our existing modular to provide an overall new layout size of 50' x 50'.
The engine house was built by one of our team members, David Revelia. I've attached a couple interior photos of the engine house. I'll post other photos once we have the other structures complete.
Later
Richard
Sundance Central Modular Railroad

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Thanks for the update.
Nicely done shop(as are all the other scenes on the layout(I voted for it at Portland ME!))
Anxiously awaiting pics and links to plans of the gallows turntable.
 

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A Steamed Elder
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Richard,

When I first looked at these pictures, I truly thought they were 1:1! What beautiful modeling.
 

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That is absolutely superb!!! What great modeling. I guess it's just as well that I refrain from ultra detailing on my outdoor endeavors as I've never done anything even remotely close to that even when I was modeling indoors. I've seen some mighty fine modeling in my time but that leaves me breathless.

As Jack already said, Dave has created a true work of art.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the compliments. I'll make sure to pass them onto Dave. As a bonus I've uploaded some close-up shots for your viewing pleasure. The last photo shows the size of the engine house in respect to the room./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/wow.gif
BTW, Jack you you going to the Narrow Gauge Convention?
Thanks:D
Richard
Sundance Central Modular Railroad

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Thanks for the additional photos. I've seen pictures of the real thing that aren't as nice as this model. The builder, Dave is it, did a wonderful job on getting the colours right. That work table looks very real in terms of being a well used metal worktop.
 

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There are only two things the give away the fact that it is not a 1:1 real honest-to-goodness RR shop: The human figure and the fact that is just seems too clean. It really seems as though someone warned the shop crew that the President of the line was coming and they cleaned the place up, but it is just "too" clean.

Fantastic model.

But I have a question... how did you decide what items to put where? Stuff on the shelves, stuff on the floor, stuff on the workbenches... How did you decide what to put anywhere? I understand that a lot of the detail parts like that are available from a few places, but I have never understood how one goes about deciding what ones to use or where to put them. And I see a lot of things that I have never seen available in a catalog, so you must have selected bits and pieces of oddball scrap and made something quite realistic from them.

When I try to "decorate" a scene like that, it always seems contrived, but this model really looks REAL.

How did you decide to put that circular stain on the cart? Or that beat-up metal surface on the workbench?

Why 4 barrels on the rack? And why 2 red, one black and one gray?

I cannot read the chalkboard, but why those characters and drawings and why partially erased?

Where did you get the idea to put the ladder on the toolbox? Or the toolbox on the shelf that has tipped, and to tip the shelf in the first place?

Why the placement of the bolts spilled on the floor and the tools on the bench?

Please realize that most of my questions are rhetorical, I don't really expect an answer to each and every one of the examples I mention... it would take way too long for me to list all the examples... but overall I would like to understand the thought processes you went through for ALL the details, the myriad of details that I keep seeing more and more and more of.
 

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Posted By Richard Schmitt on 07/22/2008 5:44 PM

BTW, Jack you you going to the Narrow Gauge Convention?


Thanks


Richard


Sundance Central Modular Railroad



Richard,


Thanks for asking. I guess it's a bit problematical at this point. Believe it or not, I've gone back to work and I don't know if I'll be able to break away from the new job that long. All I can say is: if I can, I will.

Hope to see you (and everybody else) in Portland this September.


Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hi C.T.,
In response to your first comment, the engine house is clean in comparision to the real 1:1 structure. We still have not run engines into the shed and we therefore left enough space to see how much clutter we can add inside and not cause problems with operation of the locomotives.

As to how do you know what to place where. Well, we first start by doing a lot of book research looking at photos of old engine sheds, machine shops and the like. There is also a lot of photos and information about them in smaller scale kits. In creating a scene you want to tell a story. As an example the long work bench against the wall. They would of had a work bench to work on small parts of the locomotives or cars. Since the era being modeled is '30 to '40's, most backwood repair sheds built their benches out of wood. Hammering on parts there would be a metal top on part of the bench. Benches had vises to hold the parts. Drill, drill bits, files, hammers, rags and those items would have been used at the work bench. Over time the bench area got cluttered with various items. I'm sure you spilled paint before on a work surface and either cleaned as much as possible with a rag or just left the paint spill dry. This work bench is telling a story of how workers performed their everyday tasks. All the scenes depict everyday life of working in a engine repair shed.

A lot of the parts are scratch built since there is very little available in 1:20.3 scale. As an example, all the metal drums (even though solid ones are available from manufacturers) are fabricated from thin metal sheets. We prefer to make them, so we can have open top drums, dented sides or even totally rusted out drums.

Hope this helped answer your questions.
Thanks
Richard
Sundance Central Modular Railroad
 

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As a member of the group, I have nothing but praise for Dave's amazing ability with structures and also his painting of figures. He has a true "artists eye" when it comes to both.
 

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WOW !!!!

How did you do that? the "accessories" laying about are what really sells the illusion. At first, I too thought these were photos of the prototype.

Fabulous job on the model AND on the photography!

Bill W
 

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A Steamed Elder
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Richard,

For over forty years, I worked in old die shops that looked just like that model. The "clutter" is astounding! I can smell the oil and grease and "hear" the sounds of hammers on steel! Just a beautiful model. Dave is a true artist!:D
 

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Great work! Thanks for shaing. I look forward to seeing the whole set of new modules.
 
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