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I have seen a couple of articles where nailers were used for structures. I was wondering if anyone uses and electric brad nailer as opposed to pneumatic?
 

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I have used several brad nailers in the construction of my trestles. They are all pneumatic except one manual one for repairs outside on the hill. My original is a Craftsman and it shoots brads from 3/8 inch to 1-1/4 inch. It has done a great job. I have not found an electric one which can shoot 3/8 or 1/2 inch brads. I also bought a Harbor Freight which also shot staple, but it tends to leave a slot when it shoots brads. I also have the Grex pin nailer, but the pins are so thin they do not have any serrations to hold it, and the wetting and swelling of wood can pull off of the headless pin. In this case you do need glue.

I am waiting for a DeWalt 18 volt battery powered brad nailer, but so far it only shoots big brads and finish nails.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Richard,

Stanley makes 2 of them, the larger one shoots 5/8" to 1-1/4" brads and the smaller shoots heavy duty staples as well as 1/2",9/16" & 5/8" brads.

http://www.stanleytools.com/default.asp?CATEGORY=HT%5FCONS%5FFAST&TYPE=PRODUCT&PARTNUMBER=TRE550&SDesc=Electric+Staple%2FBrad+Nail+Gun

They are a great deal, less than $30.00 at walmart for the smaller one.

BTW, Ryobi makes your 18V cordless model.

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&productId=100485420&N=10000003+90401

Chris
 

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Posted By Richard Weatherby on 01/22/2009 7:48 PM
I have used several brad nailers in the construction of my trestles. They are all pneumatic except one manual one for repairs outside on the hill. My original is a Craftsman and it shoots brads from 3/8 inch to 1-1/4 inch. It has done a great job. I have not found an electric one which can shoot 3/8 or 1/2 inch brads. I also bought a Harbor Freight which also shot staple, but it tends to leave a slot when it shoots brads. I also have the Grex pin nailer, but the pins are so thin they do not have any serrations to hold it, and the wetting and swelling of wood can pull off of the headless pin. In this case you do need glue.

I am waiting for a DeWalt 18 volt battery powered brad nailer, but so far it only shoots big brads and finish nails.


Richard,

Please let us know how that DeWalt 18v brad nailer works out. I have several DeWalt 18 volt tools and they're well worth the extra money for the great power and long lasting endurance. Does the brad nailer come with the same batteries as the drill/driver so they'll be interchangeable?

Richard Smith
 

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I have the smaller Stanley electric nail or a vaiant thereof that Chris mentioned. I did not buy it for nailing. I needed a stapler years ago for some non-railroad project or another. It works great as a stapler. As a nailer I really had to practice and learn to get good results. I marked the front edge of the gun as a guide for where the brads would be shot. The nailer pressure setting was usually best left at "full", but I've run into the odd soft lot of lumber that requires backing off. I found that going slow, making sure I was square and solid to the work piece before each shot makes all the difference in the world. Having said that, I have nothing to compare this experience too. I have never used a pneumatic nailler or any other electric nailer for that matter so these issues might apply equally to them as well, I don't know.

For what its worth.

Robert
 

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I've used electric as well as pneumatic nailer's and have had less then satisfactory performance from the electrics, if you don't have an air compressor buy one you'll find lots of uses for one....or you could use one of those 12v car tire types or even the cars spare tire, for the last year or so I have been using a pin nailer which I would highly recommend getting plus a brad nailer.... you can get them at Harbor Freight
air compressor[/b]
pin nailer
brad nailer[/b][/b]
 

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I would stick with the pneumatic stuff, light weight, more powerful, easy to handle, easy to maintain. The electrics just don't have the power, especially when you are driving nails through hardwoods such as mahogany. The DeWalt is ok but it is bulky and heavy, and is not to easy to work with in confined areas. I have used a brad nailer but sometimes it is over kill, the guage of the nail is to heavy for finer work. I mostly use a pin nailer & glue for all my exterior & interior work.
Glen
 

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I agree completely with comments above and use of pneumatic and pin nailers. What I meant when I said I was waiting for DeWalt was a new and redesigned brad nailer for smaller work. The current model seems to have a significant safety recall.

http://www.dewalt.com/us/articles/article.asp?ID=1633

I didn't realize I had the Stanley model, because I thought it was only a stapler.
 

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I agree also with the comments about pneumatic nailers. I have Porter Cable as well as the Grex pin nailer. Living on acreage though it'd be nice to have a good battery powered nailer (I haven't seen any I've liked thus far) that would be more portable for "in the field repairs" use without dragging out a compressor and hoses.
 

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After working for years with non powered tools I wouldn't be without pneumatic tools wheather air or gas. Battery are ok just my personal preferance for air.

Richard W. Although I've only been able to view your work through photos and they don't give the full picture of your property layout maybe you could run an air line out near the layout. I know you have a hard gravel surface to deal with but if you run some plastic or copper water line( 1/2") out, from your compressor with proper fittings for easy connection, you could get within 100' of your furthest reach and you could have air when needed.If you use a short section of air hose between comp. and line you would only pressure it when needed. I've done this on mine because of distances without problem.

Dave
 

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Richard, I agree with Dave I have 3/4 PVC air line that goes about 200' under a wide gravel drive...been there for about 15 years without a problem..... :) :)
 

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I think Stan had a thread about air nailers somewhere, any ways he gave a heads up on a sale at Harbor Frieght on a air nailer for $18.00, I bought it, I also have a portable compresser from Craftsman, I just wheel the compresser outside, my hose is about 25 ft. Mine shoots 3/8 to 2.0 in I think. I couldnt do without that anymore.

Tom H
 

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I had two electric brad nailers that were worthless.

Around Christmas time HOME DEPOT had a HUSKY compressor and two brad nailers on sale. It compressor was small. But it would be good for the two nailers. Also it wold be good to power a AIR BRUSH.

My sister had a slow leak in her tire. She called me and I went over with my Envoy and filled it with the compressor on my Envoy. She mentioned this at diner with friends So they got her the compressor for Christmas and I got the nailers.
 

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Never tried an electric nailer so can't comment on them.

I have a 23 guage Senco pneumantic pinner that I bought as a fun toy years ago. The fun toy has now turned into one of those "Have to Have" tools. I'm just finishing the latest project that was full of odd angles that would have been very difficult to clamp in spots. Soooo much easier to get a perfect alignment of parts and then just have one pull of the trigger to get it fixed in the exact spot.

I've never had a glue joint fail when I've pinned it. Doesn't replace the glue - just makes the glue far more effective.
 

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I also bought one of those Harbor Freight ones, and it's done just fine--though I've not yet used it in RR construction.

Les
 

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I think a good deal is the 3 gun Porter Cable Set that comes with a small compressor. I have the PC brad gun, staple gun, finish nailer. Later i had bought a
PC 23 gauge pin nailer. My compressor is a small Grip Rite. Never want to go back to a hammer and nail set.
 

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the 18 ga brad nailers tend to split small stock, especially harder stuff. The 23 ga headless pin nailers don't split wood, but they are not useful for holding a final joint. They are EXTREMELY useful for pinning a glued joint so that you can keep working without disturbing glue that hasn't set up yet.

I only have experience with pneumatic nailers.
 

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then get a pin nailer. On softer materials, it is hard to get a brad nailer to properly set the nails or staples without leaving an indentation.
 

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Posted By Steve Stockham on 02/04/2009 8:46 PM
Oooooh....good topic!! I've been building my trestle with a manual brad nailer and that gets old pretty quickly!

Just make sure you don't get the manual type of pin nailer......
 
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