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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Maybe it's the fumes talkin' but I like the smell of paint, probably because it reminds me of when I was a kid and just starting out in model railroading. Laquers are the best, and although they stink going on, they smell nice when they are drying (my wife thinks they stink all the time). Water-based acrylics smell good too, kinda sweet going on, but lose their odor pretty quickly as they dry "just like that" and clog up your airbrush before you can set it down. Of course, while not a paint, MEK, my "gluing" medium of choice, smells OK in moderation (about as long as it takes to slop it on and quickly cover the container). For you OSHA types, yes, I do wear an approved respirator while painting. And no, I don't have a spray booth, prefering to fumigate our garage while
clearing the air periodically by opening the overhead door. Although anything not covered by a drop cloth picks up a fine patina of paint particles, the way I see it, this coating keeps my tools from rusting in our marine climate.

As for MEK fumes, Al Armitage, the man who put styrene modeling on the map (he desgined a lot of model railroad kits for Revell), lived to almost 90, so how bad can the stuff be? That's just a rhetorical question.I know what MEK can do. I Googled it.
 

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When I was younger, a lot of the kids sniffed glue. I never tried sniffing the glue. I didn't know why at the time, but I was getting my high painting model Cars. AMT's laquer spray paints were by far the best. No wonder they disapreared after only a couple years.
 

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Only lead-based paints.
Especially heated.
 

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An old boss of mine told me they used to mouth pipette benzene back in the day. He's still alive and kickin' with no liver cancer yet.

-Brian
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
See Garrett, with our keen sense of smell we could get a job on "CSI Miami." I always wanted to meet Callie. :)
 

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Posted By joe rusz on 12/27/2008 12:35 AM
See Garrett, with our keen sense of smell we could get a job on "CSI Miami." I always wanted to meet Callie. :)" src="http://www.mylargescale.com/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/smile.gif" align="absMiddle" border="0" />


You are not too far off actually.......
 

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There is a cleaner we use in the printing industry called Metering Roller Cleaner. (MRC) It gives me a headache with just a sniff. If you get it on your jeans and don't get it off it will blister your skin. Lacquer thinner gives me a headache also.

My sence of smell seems to root out things I really don't want to smell. It is very sensative. It can be a pain in the neck
 

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Posted By John J on 12/27/2008 9:19 AM
There is a cleaner we use in the printing industry called Metering Roller Cleaner. (MRC) It gives me a headache with just a sniff. If you get it on your jeans and don't get it off it will blister your skin.



The old stuff had Methylene Chloride in it, the newer stuff is.....xylene or heptane, cannot remember which. The skin blistering makes me think y'all are using the older stuff?
 

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Yup!

Been like this ever since
 

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Only paint smell I really like is that on a new car. Smell used to be stronger than it is today. I still remember the smell of my brand new '55 Chevy.
 

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Those of you with a keen sense of smell (not just a keen smell)... you are probably candidates for a CPAP (or BiPAP) machine (if you don't already have one!). I would bet your spouse would say that you snore considerably, too (or did before you got the CPAP/BiPAP you already have)! You proably have many loose folds of skin membranes in your nasal cavities that provide a place for many more odor sensing nerves and thus you can detect odors more easily... and the folds of skin are what cause snoring amd "Sleep Apnea" and thus the need for aid in breathing at night when your muscles relax, letting the folds of skin go loose and rattle or close off the breathing passages.

I am also very sensitive to odor and some can cause headaches and others can be much worse. The headaches are just from overwhelming sensory input from excessive nerve endings. The "worse" is actually an alergic reaction to certain things like tobacco and many flower(weed!) and petroleum based oderiferants, like potpourri and other room "fresheners", sprays, evaporants, candles, etc. (I don't know what is so "fresh" about something that causes an immediate emptying of the stomach).


As for "enjoying" the smell of paint fumes... kids (and the police) call that 'huffing" these days and is not only "not recommended", it is downright stupid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
C.T.--I don't snore (says my wife) and I don't have sleep apnea, thank God. But I do have a sensitive smeller and can detect odors at a whiff. And like some of you, me and the ms don't like scented anything, except maybe anti-presperant, which we gotta use. IBTW, having a sensitive smeller also expalins why we are always fighting weight--because the mere smell of food gets us primed for eating. Now as for sniffing paint, glue, etc, I knew my post would go there, even though that was not what I intended. Frankly, I can't imagine getting high on anything that can kill ya. And by the way, that's why I had to get the sales clerk to unlock to rattle can cabinet at Lowe's--because they don't want kids swiping it off the shelves to inhale or for graffiti.

Regarding another post, thanks C.T. for informing Peter Bunce of the meaning/implication of "anal." I'll admit that I am--at times--so what's the problem? Maybe this explains why I drive a car with the engine in the rear (Porsche). :)
 

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I guess when I'm dull coating a car in the shop it sure is something. Funny you go to any stores now and buy any glue and they got to make sure your old enough to buy. Guess they figure I'm going to sniff it and get high. Yikes dummies. i'm to old for that stuff. Later RJD
 

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Posted By Semper Vaporo on 12/27/2008 2:34 PM
Those of you with a keen sense of smell (not just a keen smell)... you are probably candidates for a CPAP (or BiPAP) machine (if you don't already have one!). I would bet your spouse would say that you snore considerably, too (or did before you got the CPAP/BiPAP you already have)! You proably have many loose folds of skin membranes in your nasal cavities that provide a place for many more odor sensing nerves and thus you can detect odors more easily... and the folds of skin are what cause snoring amd "Sleep Apnea" and thus the need for aid in breathing at night when your muscles relax, letting the folds of skin go loose and rattle or close off the breathing passages.

I am also very sensitive to odor and some can cause headaches and others can be much worse. The headaches are just from overwhelming sensory input from excessive nerve endings. The "worse" is actually an alergic reaction to certain things like tobacco and many flower(weed!) and petroleum based oderiferants, like potpourri and other room "fresheners", sprays, evaporants, candles, etc. (I don't know what is so "fresh" about something that causes an immediate emptying of the stomach).


As for "enjoying" the smell of paint fumes... kids (and the police) call that 'huffing" these days and is not only "not recommended", it is downright stupid.

I am quite sure I got what you discribe. I can not sleep on my back anymore. I wake up gasping for air. So right now I am content to sleep on my side. When I sleep on my left side my sinuses plug up in a matter of minutes. I breath through my mouth. It sucks getting older some times.
 

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Posted By John J on 12/27/2008 8:28 PM
Posted By Semper Vaporo on 12/27/2008 2:34 PM
Those of you with a keen sense of smell (not just a keen smell)... you are probably candidates for a CPAP (or BiPAP) machine (if you don't already have one!). I would bet your spouse would say that you snore considerably, too (or did before you got the CPAP/BiPAP you already have)! You proably have many loose folds of skin membranes in your nasal cavities that provide a place for many more odor sensing nerves and thus you can detect odors more easily... and the folds of skin are what cause snoring amd "Sleep Apnea" and thus the need for aid in breathing at night when your muscles relax, letting the folds of skin go loose and rattle or close off the breathing passages.

I am also very sensitive to odor and some can cause headaches and others can be much worse. The headaches are just from overwhelming sensory input from excessive nerve endings. The "worse" is actually an alergic reaction to certain things like tobacco and many flower(weed!) and petroleum based oderiferants, like potpourri and other room "fresheners", sprays, evaporants, candles, etc. (I don't know what is so "fresh" about something that causes an immediate emptying of the stomach).


As for "enjoying" the smell of paint fumes... kids (and the police) call that 'huffing" these days and is not only "not recommended", it is downright stupid.

I am quite sure I got what you discribe. I can not sleep on my back anymore. I wake up gasping for air. So right now I am content to sleep on my side. When I sleep on my left side my sinuses plug up in a matter of minutes. I breath through my mouth. It sucks getting older some times.






I heartily recommend you see your physician about it.

Sleep Apnea is a real problem and there are several courses of treatment that can and do help. CPAP or BiPAP are only two of them. Send me a private message if you want to know more about how I found out about it and the simple tests (I slept right though them!) and so on. I praise God for my CPAP. NO MORE MIGRAINES! YIPPIE!
 

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What a lot of folks don't realize is the quickly made diagnosis of "sleep apnea" can be a problem in the insurance world. My wife was an underwriter for years until she stayed home w/ the kiddies. This was a red flag for an almost automatic denial of coverage for applicants for health insurance.

Smelling is not the same as huffing.

The huffer will confine the stuff into a can or bag and get a strong drag out of it. The solvents and gasses that impact the central nervous system are the most common, with simple asphyxiants (displace oxygen in the lungs, CO2, Freon, Nitrogen, etc) a close second.
 

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Posted By Spule 4 on 12/27/2008 11:02 PM
What a lot of folks don't realize is the quickly made diagnosis of "sleep apnea" can be a problem in the insurance world. My wife was an underwriter for years until she stayed home w/ the kiddies. This was a red flag for an almost automatic denial of coverage for applicants for health insurance.

Smelling is not the same as huffing.

The huffer will confine the stuff into a can or bag and get a strong drag out of it. The solvents and gasses that impact the central nervous system are the most common, with simple asphyxiants (displace oxygen in the lungs, CO2, Freon, Nitrogen, etc) a close second.


I was diagnosed (about 14 years ago) early in the recognition of Sleep Apnea and the development of CPAP (BiPAP did not exist yet). I went through a night sleep test (and I didn't even have to study for it!) and I had to take some pills for a couple of weeks to see if it would help, or insurance would not pay for any of it.

The pills didn't help at all, instead they caused me to have so much saliva that I had trouble swallowing it all, yet I was so thirsty I was drinking almost continously by the 3rd day (Yes, those symptoms do kind of go together!) so I called the Doctor the 4th day and he told me to forget the pills. Then he scheduled the "Sleep Test" for the next week.

I did have to argue again with the insurance company but it was a silly argument. They would pay for the tests, the pills, 1 month of CPAP rental (nearly $1000) and then required I have surgery to remove excess skin folds in my nose and throat. If the CPAP worked I saw no reason to stop using it and having a "Roto-rooter" run up my nose!

The silly part of the argument is that BUYING the CPAP would cost them only about $1,000 (I paid the other $500) and the surgery would be $20,000 to $30,000 and incur greater health risks than continuing to use the CPAP.

They have since balked at paying for the consumables for the CPAP (air filters, head gear that wears out, etc.) and I remind them at that time that I could still have the surgery and cost them more than 10 times the cost of the CPAP plus 100 years of consumables. Still, I sometimes have to pay for some of the consumables out of pocket... sometimes I get a bill for all of it, sometimes I get a bill for part of it and sometimes I don't get a bill at all and it doesn't matter how much I have already paid on medical bills (I know that because there have been 2 years where I had NO other medical bills and yet I didn't get billed for 1 order of consumables each year).

But, CPAP "cured" my migraines, no doubt about it. That is not to say it is a cure for all sleep problems or all migraines, but it was for ME.


As for "smelling" paint and "huffing"... if one "enjoys the odor" it might lead one to seeking greater enjoyment by concentrating it, if not for mature and rational thinking.
 

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Interesting on the claims end of this.

But with my wife's job of being an underwriter, denial of coverage for new policy.....ie, you are now un-insurable.
 
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