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Hi All,


I have been building for some time now my version of CCRR #7; David Fletcher has one of his finished as this loco, but mine is a different color. Nothing like variety!  The strat of this loco is in the archives still and is at    http://archive.mylargescale.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=48653

The delay was in getting the decals done, which are as usual by Stan Cedarleaf, as I am in the UK and Stan is miles (& miles) away, I wanted to hopefully save some cash by having others printed at the same time.

That was done and the other loco will follow soon.

Back to number 7 - I wanted a darkish blue, and decided to partially transplant the color of the scottish pre - group railway - the Caledonian Railway.  They are famous for a lighter sky blue, but before this they used a dark blue, which is said to be either a Prussion or Ultramine blue (the latter is NOT the artists color, but is much darker). On a model this would be almost black even in G scale!

So the search was on and eventually I used a Revell (Europe) color that is sold as midnight blue, but is very close to Oxford blue; to my eyes there is a ghost of some red in it which warms up the color - Prussion blue can be a very 'cold' color.

This would I decided to be suitable. David very kindly provided the tender and pilot, which were test cuts from Bronson Tate - these kits are very good and will save time as well; most useful.

All was painted up, and the decals applied; the tender has the white/black/white lining with (early) incurved corners fronm the CR - it follows the photos of the CCRR tenedr painting but I admit is fancier! It is put on in four pieces per side. Also the headlight side has a painting on it - this was part of the decals are done by David, and looks very nice, I added some corners on the front and some other bits to hopefully enhance things, this is really quite a plain little loco.

Here are some photos to show the final result -



A mock 'ground level'photo - all are taken inside - outside is clear but with a cold 'North easter' blowing and it is fully living up to its name and temperature - I'm staying in!




A view from the rear, showing the lining on the tender.




lLfting the camera up a bit another front view - I added a couple of big toolboxes beklow the cab as I liked the look of them.




A close up of the tender; I tried to get an accurate color match, and the rear of the tender is very close in the color. From the new book on the Colorado Central there seems to have been a lot of 'junk' carried on the tenders of the Porters - so I have added a small piece of fencing, a short ladder and some scrap planks. The coal is removable, and the tender shell is fixed down with 3 velcro strips, another idea from Dave Fletcher; the volume (& on/off) for the tender sound (as supplied by bachmann) is hidden in the water filler for the tender. 

The roof of the cab is covered in a sheet of paper that has been ruled out as the metal sheets that covered the roof, press down to leave a groove and when the painting is complete go over the grooves with a pencil to enhance them; the add some weathering for protection. The side and end strips are plastic strip added before painting.




A final shot - as the loco is getting away!, The tender top is all is plastic (styrene) card, and is all fixed to the shell; you have to add the outer skin(3 pieces) but the rest is supplies, and is laser cut. Likewise I added a couple of toolboxes to the tender; the interior of the tender is a mucky red oxide  color. The coal load fits between the front toolboxes and being removable allow access to the (9 volt) battery - don't forget to switch it off after running otherwise it will soon lose its power!.

This is a nice little loco to build, there is the enormous advantage of a ready built chassis, all that has to be done is quite easy and some parts available from Bronson Tate for the tricky bits, these will save a lot of work. You then have a very photogenic little loco; now I am building the freight cars to go with it. There already is a long baggage car available (again from Bronson Tate), and soon there MAY be a CCRR coach to go with it. Trains on the CCRR were not long, fwhen these engines were the main motive power, four vehicles is the average.

Some more are being built  (I can think of one certainly),  and I am sure there are more - this is an ideal 'starter loco', and is capable of many variations: the CCRR had three different styles (though the first (a saddle tank) has not been described or included in the comprehensive PDF, and instruction set available for download) for a start!

So to the (hopeful) builders of these locos, come on, (& I am sure there are more of you) let us see the results of your labors, I know that we will all be interested in them!
 

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Peter, A really great little loco, super craftmanship and a beautiful finish. You really do make little jewels!!!
 

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Yet another example of your fine craftmanship, Peter.   Well done, indeed.   I really like that color, but you need to brave that cold weather /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/doze.gif for some outdoor shots.
 

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Peter,

I continue to admire your work.  I envy your ability to build these locomotives.  I'm attempting to build the Mason Bogie but many of the mechanical aspects tend to overwhelm me.  In spite of what some might say, I think building a locomotive from scratch requires many more skills than those required to buld rolling stock.  Congratulations on another fine piece.

Doc
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Posted By docwatsonva on 03/17/2008 5:32 AM
Peter,

I continue to admire your work.  I envy your ability to build these locomotives.  I'm attempting to build the Mason Bogie but many of the mechanical aspects tend to overwhelm me.  In spite of what some might say, I think building a locomotive from scratch requires many more skills than those required to build rolling stock.  Congratulations on another fine piece.

Doc

Hi Doc, 

Thank you for the kind comments and that applies to all who have replied.


It all depends on the locomotive. The Mason is a complicated loco; both for the pivot, tender truck, and most of all the Walschaerts vale gear!  The tender truck I think has been dealt with by Bronson Tate's kit for it though, and understandably it needs pickups added, the pivot is capable of being mad and the valve gear is always complicated BUT & A VERY BIG HELP INDEED is David's laser cut fret of the stuff. That is a massive help. I would still like to build a 2 8 6 but that seems to be fast fading away alas.

Coaches are different and in their own way complicated things, American clerestory ones especially so - its the drop ends I think. I have in a somewhat overlong list some of the early flat (really a low arc) roofed D&RG coaches as a start on scratch building them.

Your private car is a beauty, and looks better every time! I have on to build, thank you for your ideas re the inside, and also to Kevin Strong, and his work on Obisonia for his ideas. I am learning a lot which is all to the good - progress is being made!
 

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Peter / Stan,

Is that a waterslide decal on the side of the headlight?

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Posted By markoles on 03/18/2008 9:09 AM
Peter / Stan,

Is that a waterslide decal on the side of the headlight?

Mark


Hi Mark,

YES!, I did a painting for the side of the headlight on the Mason bogie by hand; that started a bit of a trend as the first Porter that I built was a version of  the Dawson & Bailey Locomotive that was the first on the Denver & South Park.

That had a large central panel on the tender that is a painting - that went well; I painted the master at five times its final size and the results can be seen in the photo, this also very small shows the headlamp side on the Mason Bogie.



This was from a photo at Beaver Brook on the Colorado Central where the CCRR's D&B mogul has one.

Moving on from that David Fletcher added two copies of two designs into the decal sheet master. Stan did his magic, and one set are used here.

The sides (one side generally the fireman's side is a door) of the headlight can have designs on them , the latest is a 'geometerical one' with some tiny bits added to link it in with the rest of the loco's design.. DSP #1 andDSP #69 have these  the next loco also has one.

In addition, I usually add on the front some small bits culled from the spares on the decal sheets in the corners, and possibly a small star on the top, on the curved portion. They can be seen in photos: some are very poor or indistinct but they are there!

I put it under the group heading of 'Pride of the loco crew' and that will cover a large range of  what some will call 'fancy frippery!   But it was done, fon not forget that in the early times a lot of locomotives were allocated to just one crew who were expected to look after it,  repair it on the road whenn required , so they treated it as their own, with generally good results.

In the late 1800s in Britain certain loco superintendents, who were both in charge of building locomotives (British Railways tended to build their own locomotives) and also their day to day running took to wearing white cotton or kid leather gloves. These were wiped under the edge of the footplate valance, when he was out and about, and 'woe betide' the crew if any dirt was found!!   These were the days of locomotives being '***** and span' and gleaming, when they came down from the loco sheds. The crew were even photographed keeping this cleanliness up whilst on the road, in addition to fixing the poor lubrication (drip feed only to start with) and recalcitrant vale gear at times.

.
 

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That's really impressive. I watched a B-man 4-4-0 chassis slip away on ebay a few months ago...would have been the basis of DSP&P #2...the D&B 4-4-0.

From the archive, I see that you found the painting in a picture in the book "The South Park"...is this Ferrel's book? The only picture I was otherwise aware of with #1 is Chamberlain's photo that shows up in Poor and several other South Park books...it's just pulling out of Morrison with a pair of Hallack brothers boxcars (J&S clones) and a combine (again, a J&S clone).

Have you built any excursion cars for this fine CC porter?

Michael
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Posted By DSP&P fan on 04/10/2008 8:39 AM
That's really impressive. I watched a B-man 4-4-0 chassis slip away on ebay a few months ago...would have been the basis of DSP&P #2...the D&B 4-4-0.
From the archive, I see that you found the painting in a picture in the book "The South Park"...is this Ferrel's book? The only picture I was otherwise aware of with #1 is Chamberlain's photo that shows up in Poor and several other South Park books...it's just pulling out of Morrison with a pair of Hallack brothers boxcars (J&S clones) and a combine (again, a J&S clone).
Have you built any excursion cars for this fine CC porter?
Michael





Hi Michael,

Yes that is the one of two photos (at Morrison, and there are two the other is in Ferrel's book), though the CCRR has a D&B mogul that was also used. I took modelers licence in having a 'wavy roof'' cab, because I like it, and also the longer bogie (as supplied) tender, which still has the rudimentary sound system in it. There is also a painting of the loco as you say, by Phil Ronfor. I also did the painting for the tender (as from the CCRR mogul which had one), that went to David Fletcher who worked his CAD magic for the rest of the decal sheet.

D&B #2 can be made from the 4 4 0 BUT it will need a new cab, as it is quite different; also the Bachmann cab is a 'so & so' to get off; the two rear fixing screws are hidden by the under can supports at the rear!

The quite fancy tender lettering will also need to be drawn out, and that will take a time, as to ensure accuracy it should be 5x the finished size; I know from doing the lettering masters for DSP 69 how long it took, and #2 is fancier! . Also a new and slimmer steam dome would be needed.
 

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Cool ideas Peter. I'm hoping my wife will help with custom lettering...she's a graphic designer. When I do have a chance to built #2, I'll probably scrap everything but the chassis...like you, I'm a glutton for such punishment. I'd also like to turn an Annie into a Cooke 2-6-0 like you did. For plans, I have the 1998 MR with the cooke 2-6-0s, I've partially completed drawings of #2 (I posted them on one of the DSP&P yahoo groups), and I have some stuff on the bogies.

I'm curious, why didn't you use CDS dry transfers for your cooke mogul? Do they not offer them in 1:20.3 scale? Regardless, what you did do...looks great.

I really need to get a copy of Ferrel's book. That and the new CC book are the only South Park books I don't have. Figures that there'd be some good stuff in it! A copy of the CC book will be finding a home on my bookshelf within the next year.

Is there a link to all of your rolling stock? I've seen a waycar, a passenger car, a 27' Tiffany, a Lime car, and a coal car...any other goodies? They've very similar to what I've been building in On3.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Posted By DSP&P fan on 04/10/2008 1:03 PM
Cool ideas Peter. I'm hoping my wife will help with custom lettering...she's a graphic designer. When I do have a chance to built #2, I'll probably scrap everything but the chassis...like you, I'm a glutton for such punishment. I'd also like to turn an Annie into a Cooke 2-6-0 like you did. For plans, I have the 1998 MR with the cooke 2-6-0s, I've partially completed drawings of #2 (I posted them on one of the DSP&P yahoo groups), and I have some stuff on the bogies.
I'm curious, why didn't you use CDS dry transfers for your cooke mogul? Do they not offer them in 1:20.3 scale? Regardless, what you did do...looks great.
I really need to get a copy of Ferrel's book. That and the new CC book are the only South Park books I don't have. Figures that there'd be some good stuff in it! A copy of the CC book will be finding a home on my bookshelf within the next year.
Is there a link to all of your rolling stock? I've seen a waycar, a passenger car, a 27' Tiffany, a Lime car, and a coal car...any other goodies? They've very similar to what I've been building in On3.

Hi, That is the article I started with but I think (for the Cooke) there were some alterations alomng the way. The whole tale is on my wbsite, ehich is part of my daughters website; www.musiccorner.co.uk and go to the left hand side, scroll down to G scale and then the loco's - that is its location. The Cooke Mogul was my first loco build, its quite a loco.
I scratch build my freight cars, there are some boxcars as well; I use Ron Rudnick's excellent Denver, South Park & Pacific Modelling Guide. That is is American O gauge (1:48) so they get scanned and enlarged! Many more need to be built - locos, and buildings get in the way! Stan Cedarleaf does my transfers - they are watersilde and good, I don't like dry transfers as you only have 'one shot' with them; waterslide can be moved and Stans will accept some moving, as I have done it.
Somewhere I still have the master for the Cooke decals; don't forget to make the 'master' 5X finished size, that helps to hide the minor mistakes!
Dave Fletcher did a massive set of articles on the Mason Bogies - go to the Archives, then Masterclass, and then Mason Bogie, and get plenty of paper and ink for the printer in stock - you will need it. There are full, and I mean full PDF's there for them.
You do not say where you live (the area NOT a full address!), but check Amazon re the books; Mel Ferrell's book is very good indeed. The CCRR book in the UK can be bought from Camden Miniature Steam services
 

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Peter, I see what you mean about the 1998 MR article...I had to pull it and check with my scale...GSC drew it as a 54" boiler! I had previously thought it to be 50", as your website said, and the Colorado Road by Wagner agrees with us!

I've learned the hard way with the dry transfers...my boxcar 516 has crooked lettering from the dry transfers (I went letter by letter). I'll probably apply the transfers to decal sheets for application the next time.

I can't recall if it was the Mason Bogie class or your waycar article that first brought me to MLS as a lurker a year or two ago. I previously just read through everything that was going on and clicked a few sponsors since I was only working in On3 (1:48). I've picked up a few tips...and plenty of inspiration.

I also make extensive use of Ron Rudnick's modeling guides. They are just incredible.

A little about me, since I'm currently just an avatar...
I live in Cincinnati, USA. I grew up in the small town of Wapakoneta (hometown of astronaut Neil Armstrong and some guy named Charles Heisler)...less than 10 miles from the Lima Locomotive Works. My wife grew up in suburban Dayton. Additionally, my dad is a preservationist (mostly Nickel Plate stuff) and has a major passion for passenger cars...restoring a few 1:1 scale cars over the years. So naturally, I love passenger cars...especially ones built by the local team...Barney & Smith...all of 10 miles from where my wife grew up. I also love Lima steam locomotives (shays, NKP berks, SP GS-4s)...in part from being raised around the NKP 765. While I dabble in NKP HO stuff (I have suffer from obsessive-compulsive NKP hudson buying disorder), my heart belongs to the Colorado narrow gauges.

My avatar picture is from last year when I made my second pilgrimage to York. I picked it because I now have long hair, and all previous train pictures of me are from when I had short hair. Besides, I enjoy the trains on the other side of the pond. I'm glad that one of those Doncaster locomotives made a wrong turn at Greenland...and I happened to run into it in Wisconsin a few years ago.

Michael
 
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