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Posted By Pete Thornton on 01/06/2009 8:11 AM
to left of that is the slotted plug/cap tube for oil



Your photos show there is a 'drain' under the LH side of the cab, but I can't tell if it is a 'blowdown' (like the C-16, see manual below) or a drain for the steam oil reservoir.





That is the drain for the lubricator. At the end of your run, when there is still some pressure left in the boiler, close the throttle and put the J-bar in neutral. Open the drain a turn or two, place a paper towel / rag / can under there and open the throttle. This will blow the reminants out of the lubricator. Close the drain. Then you can fill the lubricator again by opening the top and filling with steam cylinder oil.

Of course you should always verify your lubricator is full before a run.
 

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One more thing.... Always make sure your engines throttle is closed while cooling. When a boiler cools it will create a vacuum that can "pull" oil out of the lube and into the boiler.
 

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Posted By David Leech on 01/06/2009 10:21 PM
Posted By David Rose on 01/06/2009 9:04 AM
One more thing.... Always make sure your engines throttle is closed while cooling. When a boiler cools it will create a vacuum that can "pull" oil out of the lube and into the boiler.


David,
Do you not mean 'open' when cooling?
Surely, if it IS closed, it WILL suck in anything it can.
Anyway, I would be more concerned with the possibility of the throttle 'seizing up solid' when cold, and not being sure if it will open next time the loco is used.
All the best,
David Leech,
Delta, Canada


David,

Perhaps leaving both the throttle and the lub drain open until cool down is over is a possible option? I was unaware that throttles 'seize up solid' if you leave them closed while cooling, especially after doing this a few hundred times myself and not experiencing a seizure. I do know that if you leave the throttle open during a cool down, it will suck steam oil in the boiler if there is no other path of 'less' resistance (like a blown down which this engine does not appear to have) for it to pull from.
 
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