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Discussion Starter #1
Within a month, I'll be building 2 of these turnouts. They do not have points and do not in any way move. They are just to divert the NG off the mainline bridge at 2 locations so there will just be frogs and rail cuts where the divergence occurs. Hoping someone might have photos or tips. Scale is 7/8 and gauges are 2' and 18". Rails will be 250 for both gauges.
 

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Posted By SE18 on 03/25/2008 8:44 AM
Within a month, I'll be building 2 of these turnouts. They do not have points and do not in any way move. They are just to divert the NG off the mainline bridge at 2 locations so there will just be frogs and rail cuts where the divergence occurs. Hoping someone might have photos or tips. Scale is 7/8 and gauges are 2' and 18". Rails will be 250 for both gauges.


We used to call them "escapes", as one gauge escapes from the dual gauge.

I uploaded drawings of some F/Fn3 escapes.  Click here for the .JPG (which is a bit fuzzy)  Click here for a 5-page PDF of a #6 escape with the drawing at full size.

There's an interesting problem with a dual gauge 'wye' which needs a sort-of escape (from Hilton's book.)



I probably have an escape (gauge 0 escaping from gauge 1) stored in my garage along with all this track:



Email me offline if you want any of the pieces - this layout was torn up when we moved to the condo..
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Here’s my escape I constructed for 32mm and 45mm. I’m 99% done with the escape at the other end. The reason for multigauge is to get both gauge tracks across a 30+ foot concrete arch bridge

 

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The reason for multigauge is to get both gauge tracks across a 30+ foot concrete arch bridge


Ah - I guess you never heard of a "Gantlet" track?
http://www.answers.com/topic/gantlet-track?cat=technology

Google Images has plenty of examples. But it needs one more rail than you used, so you came out ahead.
Just kidding. In fact, a gantlet is needed when the two tracks are the same gauge and you don't want switches that could cause trouble if a trains end up on the wrong line.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks for feedback. Yes, don't want to expend effort with a 4th rail. I believe the prototype railroads would agree. Gantlets were likely for shorter distances.Incidentally, I added some extra protection rails or whatever they are called for both escape tracks at the points of divergence and frog. Also, completed the other one. When the photo was taken, only 1 was in place.
I'd be happy to see what others have done with their escapes. Feel free to hijack this thread with your work
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Pete,

Someone questioned the term "escape" track. Is that "official" RR jargon or a term you coined?

Your downloads were useful
 

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added some extra protection rails or whatever they are called

Check (or guard) rails, actually. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch

Posted By SE18 on 04/16/2008 5:01 AM
Pete,
Someone questioned the term "escape" track. Is that "official" RR jargon or a term you coined?


How dare they question us!

Let me first point out that I learned railway-ese as a young person in England, so I often confuse terminology: switches become points, points become blades, etc. As Churchill said: "Two countries separated by a common language"!


The second answer is: if in doubt, Google it!

"Escape" (as I understood the term) is actually a fairly generic railroad term for any track that allows an 'escape' movement by a loco or train. They aren't restricted to a narrow gauge track 'escaping' from a standard/dual gauge section.

Most of my friends call this an escape - I've no idea whether the rest of the world shares this particular usage!
Update: Wikipedia calls it "bifurcation".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Switch-bifurcation_of_dual_gauge_rail_near_Jindrichuv_Hradec.jpg
 

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The word 'escape' is also used in stub-station track terminology. The engine stops short of end-of-track, decouples from train, pulls ahead crossing a switch and stops. The switch is thrown and the engines backs up, crossing over to a parallel track, and 'escapes' to the engine facility.

And if you've been in hilly country, you have probably seen escape paths for run-away trucks whose brakes have failed on a down hill journey. Trains had them, too.

Art, a non-believer in Wikipedia.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
thanks, Pete,
Schlosser,
You don't have to be in hill country. There's one such "escape" on the Norfolk Southern in the Springfield VA area at Robinson Terminal. The spur to the terminal has a pretty good grade (for an otherwise relatively flat area) and there's an escape track there. I see it every day riding in on the VRE.
Some highways also have escapes for truckers on steep grades. They usually end in gravel and then a dirt hump

Pete:
Incidentally, the link you provided: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Switch-bifurcation_of_dual_gauge_rail_near_Jindrichuv_Hradec.jpg
shows a more complex escape than mine.
You'll notice that I wisely located the narrower gauge track on the same side of the track as the escape. The other end of the escape fortunately is on the same side (narrower gauge forms an inner look configuration)
 

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shows a more complex escape than mine

Actually, they both need almost the same number of parts. The complicated bit is the frog - and you had to provide one.

Notice that the Jindrichuv Hradec escape used a switch - one more item to go wrong if your name is Murphy. The prototype photo that I posted shows how the D&RGW made the two gauges split without a point blade; they have a big check rail to force the wheels onto the new path.
 

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I was turning on the water to the garden and noticed this on top of my old track pile:



(2' gauge 'escaping' from the middle of std/multi gauge track.) Note the lack of a switch at the merge with the center rail.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Awesome!
What scale were (are) you working in? Did you mention condo? So your garden RR is gone?/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/sad.gif
 

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(Any chance you could add your name/nickname? "SE18" is tough when you are trying to be friendly.)

What scale were (are) you working in? Did you mention condo? So your garden RR is gone?


Indeed, the railroad is gone - lost to the floods of Hurricane Isabel. Here's a pic, showing the multi-gauge in the top:



When I got the first Big Hauler, I started in 1:22.5, but I had some gauge-O mining stuff (Gnm from Fleichmann) and I like making track so I did some multi-gauge track, all in the attic. When we moved to the waterfront (!) it all ended up in this layout.
 
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