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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello David,
how can I make the sliding block fasten on the lasercut drive ?
It is no a hole for scraw.

see you

Hans-Jürgen
 

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Hey HJ,
You wont need the sliding block attached to the base of the chassis. The middle frame spacer that runs up behind the motor is the sliding block. The boiler frame sits on top of this vertical frame member. At the top of this frame member are two small holes - bolt an ABS 4.6 x 4.6mm SHS to the back face of this vertical frame member to make the sliding block.

Your tender truck looks terrific!

David.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hei David,
Thanks for your help, but I m an old man :) Im  dont understand your help. I found an this point no holes for screw and the sliding block.


I think, i stick the sliding block (yello) an the rest, or ??

see you

Hans-Jürgen
 

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OK, wrong sliding block! I thought you were speaking of the sliding block at the top of the chassis between chassis and boiler!

The sliding block for the valve gear is different! The screw wont work as the block has small tollerance. Make the sliding block from styrene, with a tab at the top. Make the tab slide up inside the two brackets above the block. Use the two brackets to hold the tab and block in place with epoxy glue. Thus the sliding block is held in place from above not from the back.

Thanks HJ,
see how you go.

David.
 

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David,

Just a couple of questions. How do you wire the headlight and the smoke stack? Do I attach them to the motor? Do I run something different? 

How high does the channel have to be above the chassis? I know this resting on support that you added to the frame.  

HAPPY ST. PADDY'S DAY

George (Bear) from Indiana
 

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Hi George,
In chapter 6, for the DIY chassis and laser chassis PDFs, there is a diagram of total frame setouts, incl heights. The laser chassis has the height set with the fixed vertical member behind the motor..no more height is added.

I wire the lights straight to the motor wiring (ie to the wires from the wheel pick-ups go to the motor and lights..you can connect the lights at any place in the circuit), and use 12v globes. I prefer real globes due to the nice light they produce and the warm colour. I've never liked LEDs, even their warm ones, and some now days are over bright. Remember these were oil lamps, not flood lights!
If using LEDs and smoke unit, you'll need to source the right resistors to place in line between the wheel wipers and the lights/smoke unit to drop the voltage to the specs you need..ie 3V for the LED.

The Hartland motor is good to about 15 v, but will run fine under 12 V, Barry's pitman is also a 12v motor. 12 v globes will be fine. Sometimes I've fitted 12 v globes into locos with 24 V motors, running usually at 15-18v, and still the globes dont blow as the motor draws the most current...they'd probably blow if I ran the loco to the full 24V.

Our Masterclass motors for this loco were all 12v.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hello,
and now e new question
Between the tender drive and the tender deck is a long distance. ( 23 mm) I will use an brass tube for the distance with M3-screw.
They are hier another ideas.
see you
Hans-Jürgen
 

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Hi Hans,
Do you mean the tender truck, and tender deck?

If so yes there us a large difference and I added a new longer screw and nut here. I recessed the screw to the level of the top of the chassis, by making a hole in the tender deck that fits over the screw location. The bolt goes in from the bottom, and the nut inside has a dab of glue to keep it there!

I talk about mine at the following link -


http://archive.mylargescale.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=41467&SearchTerms=mason,bogie

about half way down, that shows the extra I added under the deck, that provides some extra for the bolt to go through and also be held. There is a spacer that barry provided, made from a piece of aluminium; I think that a piece if thick walled, and filled in the center(But leaving a hole for the bolt) pipe could be used instead. This fits between the top of the bogie and the bottom of the tender floor. The thin ring (a section of pipe) will also asisst to keep it in place.

Any more questions, ask again & I will try to help.
 

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Hello

Have My lasercut frame together need help with paint. One do I paint it as one pice together then pull it a part to add the motor and wheels or paint the parts than put all together just think of paint build up and what type of primer if any to use. Also what color would be best for it I'm buildding DSP&P Sliverton with the old type cab this was a the large 2-6-6T type used on the DSP&. Know this just the inner frame at this time have not pick and over all color also there are no pic's of her and I need help with the color over all on this type have look at the color charts for the class didn't see one I like. I like the dark red but I thinking more of a drak green almost black in color with gold trim and line work on it if I go this way would a black frame trucks and wheel look good or all red under the frame or the dark green. thanks for the help

DanS
 

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Hi Dan, re the colour of your engine, check on the model I did of the 1876 Centennial Mason in dark green incl the wheels. This is the type of style Mason was doing 1876-1879. Its likely that the scheme then changed to dark chocolate brown, per eye witness report of Gunnison in action on the DSP. Check the two views on the Accucraft web site for the two Mason colour schemes. Your engine would prototpically have been more like the Brown one.

Other Options are dark blue, much like Jim Barron did. Also wine is a period colour that is appropriate. Red wheels are a possibility, but builders were moving away from red wheels in the mid 1870s to wheels matching the base coat colour...brown all over.

The chassis frame could be brown to match the body colour, or possibly black. There is evidence to suggest Mason was painting his chassis frames black. Tender frame, drive wheels and tender wheels all in brown. Whether it be green, brown, wine or blue, Victorian era loco paint was dark, deep tones and contrast well with the gilding. This takes nothing from the guys in this class painting their locos how they like, or in brighter colours. For a good look at the actual style of this era, check the two drawings on the Accucraft web site, look at Jim Barron's dark blue engine and my 1876 engine.

For painting the laser chassis. I would assemble it with motor and axles installed (but no wheels pressed on yet). Oil the axles and mask over the axles visible inside the frame and external to the frame. Mask the motor and gearbox and spray paint. Use a metal primer first, then spray the final colour.
 

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Anyone,

I have a question, in regards, to building a frame out of brass. I have built the frame three times in styrene and it keeps warping plus the frame does not track right so I am switching to brass. Do I need to put a plastic bushing between the pickups and the frame so it won't short out? Thanks in advance.
George from northern Indiana
 

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Hi George,

It depends how the pickups are made; IF they have a plastic outer case that can be fixed to the chassis that means that they are not connected to the chassis electrically, supposing also that the wire from the pickup comes out through the plastic.

If not they will need plastic housing to therefore make them electrically dead to the chassis. This applies to both of them, are the wheels insulated by the way, because if you pick up power at the rims the centers should be insulated from the rims.

Best of luck with your chassis, if you can could you take some photos of it when you have it working?
 

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Somebody told me that plastic warps because the glue has to evaporate by flowing through the plastic, which can take weeks. I found that if I clamped the pieces tightly to my work bench, and left them for a month, they did not warp.
 
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