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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings!

I'm trying to build my layout but I am finding it very difficult to find "special" track-work such as double slip switches etc. One manufacturer that does produce a good assortment is Marklin. Does anyone have any experience with Marklin G scale switches. I'm particularly interested in purchasing their double slip switch and cross overs etc. Llias Creek (SP?) makes a pretty cool looking curved switched. Any experience with these switches?


Finally, in case anyone is interested, the USA #8 switch is amazing! I had a track set up in my department in the store where I worked and the train ran over this switch for 10 hours 5 days a week for 2 months without a single derailment. Highly recommended!

Many many thanks for all your help...


UncleHans
(to too many nieces and nephews! :)
 

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Posted By UncleHans on 01/06/2009 7:29 PM Does anyone have any experience with Marklin G scale switches. UncleHans (to too many nieces and nephews! :)" src="http://www.mylargescale.com/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/smile.gif" align="absMiddle" border="0" />




Sir - Maerklin does not make 'G scale' track of any format. Their trackwork is Gauge 1 low-profile European standard-gauge track using code 197 rail section. It is entirely unsuitable for the much coarser flanges found on much of the larger scale models, including LGB with its enormous flanges [LGB track has a profile of 335 or thereabouts]

If you are intending to run any other than Gauge 1 models with fine-scale flanges and wheel profiles on your Maerklin track then you will be very disappointed.

tac
www.ovgrs.org
 

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Hi,

To give you some advice, it would be helpful to know, what you intend to run on your track. There are at least 20 different makers of 45mm track, most of them with extremely high rails, like Code 332.

Some makers offer you a choice of different materials. E.g. Sunset Valley sells Code 250 rails made of brass, steel, alluminium or nickel silver. the offer different style trackbed (ties / sleeper) as well.

Llagas Creek offer some fine material as well in Code 200 and 250. They even offer easy to assemble kits or parts like frogs and blades for moderate prices. Combined with European style sleepers, a metre gauge switch with Code 250 rail can look like this



Once you learned how, any switsch / turnout can be assembled within a few hours.
Why should a train derail on a properly built turnout?

Have Fun

Fritz / Juergen
 

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UncleHans,
As you have discovered, the selection of switches from the large track suppliers is limited. I believe this is because there is not much demand for complexity from the community. It leaves you with two choices: Hand lay your switches, as Fritz hinted, or have them custom built. Custom built switches cost only a bit more then the ready-to-run switches of the same size. Check out SwitchCrafters web site. Others provide similar services.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for your replies! I run USA Trains and Aristocraft. I guess they wouldn't run on Maerklin track. That's really too bad because they have some amazing track-work. I never knew there was a service out there that custom makes your switch requests. I will check them out, but first I think I will try to build my own. The thought scares me because the switches I first purchased had lots of problems (Aristocraft). I find them simply unreliable. And if a major manufacturer can't get a switch correct without problems, how can a newbe like me make one from scratch? But, hey, its a hobby, give it a try.......

Thanks again.
Very helpful
 

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Hi,

starting from scratch is the hard way for a beginner. I´d suggest, to purchase a kit and a track gauge from Llagas. assemble it and you´ll get the idea.



Aristo and USA trains represent standard gauge in 1 : 29 on 45mm track. So you´ll probably need longer ties and closer spacing, than European Metre gauge in 1 : 22,5 or US 3 foot prototypes in 1 : 20,3, to make it look convincing. Track Code 200 - 250 will look fine and in scale.

If you use track power, nickelsilver or steel is the better choice over brass.

Have Fun

Fritz / Juergen
 
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