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I'm a bit trembly and, I must admit, also a bit lax in shop floor sweeping.  Net result is that, while working on my G-scale locomotives and rolling stock, I occasionally drop a piece of tiny hardware and can't find it.  I'm pretty sure that others, for whatever reasons, have lost some too.

Does anyone know a source of a hardware assortment that would provide replacements?

I sure would appreciate someone telling me--I have two cars deadlined at the moment for lack of machine screws.

Thanks,

Malcolm Stewart
 

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Not sure what area of the country you live in. But in my area(Bremerton WA) There is a store called Tacoma Screw and they have what I think is just about any kind of fasteners etc you could want and great prices to boot.So maybe there is something like this in your area?
 

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  Just looked them up online looks like the take phone orders and ship. . Here is there actual full name Tacoma Screw Products, Inc .
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      hope this helps:)
 

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If it is LGB, they offer a bag of fasteners. Some hobbyshops have small racks of hardware, mostly those that deal with R/C modelling.

Good luck, I know the feeling of loosing hardware myself....
 

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i have purchased the Aristocraft bag of screws and the ones from LGB. I was fortunate at a show to find an old LGB bag of hardware that had the slotted stainless screws.

For stripped screw holes, i now have longer screws that can be pt in place of the short ones
 

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In any given county there will usually be 1 really good hardware store that has everything in the way of hardware, and everything
else for that matter... U need to look for the one in Ur county, I'm lucky in that I only live about 2 miles from the one here.. hehe 
Having been a model railroader for well over 60 years helps too, I've accumulated about 4 large coffee cans full of miscellaneous 
hardware over the years that is my best source of instant hardware...
Paul R...
 

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Malcolm, I have ten thumbs and am constantly dropping small screws and washers while I work. I am always amazed how far inanimate objects like screws can run and find such tiny places in which to hide.


Fortunately I have a telescoping magnet hung within easy reach on the frame of my telescoping magnifier above my desk. Placing it in a tool drawer would only create havoc.



These are great for rescuing steel screws or washers that have fallen to the floor. They can also temporarily magnetize a screwdriver to hold screws being lowered into tight places. Unfortunately they can not pickup brass or stainless steel. Most dollar stores now carry them.
 

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Malcolm

Depending on your work habits and/or methods, aren't adverse to wearing a shop apron and sit down at a bench or table while doing your repair work. Then maybe doing what many jewelers do may be of some help to you.

The method they use is when they sit down at a bench to work with small parts that may get dropped and fall off the bench top. They wear a shop apron. Along the bottom edge of the apron there is a strip of Velcro® attached (usually the loop side, it tends not to collect so much junk in the fibers). Then on the underside of the bench top there is attached a strip of the mating Velcro® (i.e. the hook side). Before they begin their work they attach the bottom edge of the apron to the underside of the bench creating a trough that usually catches any errant parts before they go to far. Additionally this method has the advantage of working with any metal, plastic, or any other material type too. 
 
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