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Discussion Starter #1
in the late 1800s and the early 1900s there was a special nickname for those women, that fought for womens rights, studied and in other ways behaved "unwomanly".

but i forgot it.
anybody can help me?

korm
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Posted By kormsen on 03/02/2008 5:43 AM
in the late 1800s and the early 1900s there was a special nickname for those women, that fought for womens rights, studied and in other ways behaved "unwomanly".

but i forgot it.
anybody can help me?

korm
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I believe what you're looking for is "Suffragetts"
 
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Discussion Starter #4
wasn't there something else? like "stockings" or so?
 

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Posted By hcampbell on 03/02/2008 6:11 AM
Suffragette?

Harvey C.


The word you seek is 'suffragette' after the follower of 'Women's suffrage'. 

  See Wikipedia....The title of suffragette (also occasionally spelled suffraget) was given to members of the women's suffrage movement, originally in the United Kingdom. The term comes from the word suffrage, which means the right to vote. The word was originally coined to describe a more radical faction of the suffrage movement in the UK, mainly members of the Women's Social and Political Union, headed by Emmeline Pankhurst. Suffragist is a more general term for members of the movement, whether radical or conservative, male or female. American women preferred this more inclusive title, but people in the United States who were hostile to suffrage for the American woman used the UK word as a pejorative, since the feminine-sounding version could be dismissed more easily. In the UK, the term "suffragist" is usually used solely to describe members of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS).

However, I can't find any mention of a member of the Suffragette Movement being involved in playing with LS trains. /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/ermm.gif

tac
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Posted By tacfoley on 03/02/2008 6:55 AM
However, I can't find any mention of a member of the Suffragette Movement being involved in playing with LS trains. /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/ermm.gif

You're most likely correct Mr. Foley, they were to busy yanking the chain of the 1:1 crowd up short. /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/whistling.gif But you're correct, a question like the above would be better placed on the Public Forum if at all on the MLS web site.

As for the "Blue Stocking Society" I believe you need to drop back to the late 1700s early 1800s.
 

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Ask Mr. Foley, he's the one that seems to have objected to it being posted in the Beginner's Forum.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
well, now reading it, "blue stocking" was the forgotten expression i was seeking.

However, I can't find any mention of a member of the Suffragette Movement being involved in playing with LS trains.


nor do i. but they will get involved.
while waiting for my castingforms to dry i am making up some names for businesses in the towns of my layout.
when i came to my younger daughter (a very independent young lady) as donator of name, i remembered, that suffragettes had some connection to stockings or other clothing.

now, that my memory got helped, it all falls together. there will be a taylorshop named after my daughter, with a poster in the window, saying: New shipment of BLUE STOCKINGS arrived!
and she will be happy about it. - till she learns more english... ;-)

you see? suffragettes are going LS!

thank you all for the help!

korm
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edit: well, gentlemen, i put it in the beginners forum, because i am a beginner in the english language, and because i thought, beginner sections are for the most stupid questions. - next time i'll go public with my lack of knowledge...
 

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"there will be a taylorshop named after my daughter, with a poster in the window, saying: New shipment of BLUE STOCKINGS arrived!
and she will be happy about it. - till she learns more english... ;-)

you see? suffragettes are going LS!"



I love it!  Great idea!
Craig
 

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Korm,

I'm posting this only because you said you were a beginner in the English language although you seem to be doing pretty darn good as far as I'm concerned. I thought you might find this helpful, if not just say so and I'll delete it.

You said: " there will be a taylorshop named after my daughter". taylorshop should be tailorshop . I mentioned this in case the word tailor will be on a sign so you don't go to all that work only to find out you mis-spelled it. Otherwise I wouldn't have mentioned it at all. We all occasionally mis-spell a word now and then whether because of haste, typo or not knowing. An exception to the above might be if the tailor's name was Taylor. In this case he might take liberties with the name such as fellow I used to know that owned "Taylor Made Sausages".

Your ideas sound good. Please post photos of the tailorshop when you can. :)
 
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Discussion Starter #15
Richard, - yes it is planned to be on a sign. the 'future profession' of my daughter got changed from Taylor to Tailor. thank you!
photos will have to wait. i will spare you photos of the hobbyroombuilding,( just to save steve the work to move them from building to indoor railways ) ;-)

Dwight, thank you. so it is these ladies, that promoted the importing business of Mr. Capone? i will take note of a possible detailscene: a group of ugly women with held up signs in front of the local saloon - with a hint of blue between shoe and long skirt!

korm
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Sometimes words get misspelled because of the way they are pronounced locally. As an example, in the Ottawa Valley the word “congratulations” is pronounced “congraDulations”. I wrote it that way until the spellchecker in Word brought the error to my attention.  Ottawa itself is pronounced “Oddawah” locally, which is close to the aboriginal word for traders. The Ottawa River was heavily traveled during the fur trade era.
 
 

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Kind of like English speakers making up their own names for other peoples stuff.
Vienna, Austria is really Wien, Osterreich
Danube is really Donau
Cologne is really Köln.
etc.

Jack B.
 
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Discussion Starter #20
Kind of like English speakers making up their own names for other peoples stuff.


well, what most astonishes me, is that northamericans and english still understand each other after more than 200 years.
i am only about 30 years away from germany (in a "german" speaking community) and i wonder allways how much different the language evolves here in relation to over there.
and now i think, i will be busy for the rest of the day. found some very interesting points of view and ideas here: http://wwwjoe-daddy.blogspot.com it is not large scale, but interesting, how he sees planning and building.
have to try out some alternative layout schemes.

korm
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