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Discussion Starter #1
I have a set of LGB logging disconnect trucks. They came with 'poles' that connect to the trucks.
I believe the logs actually act as the car body between two trucks. Are the poles used between what would be a car, in this case two trucks with the logs chained to them??? I have looked all over and can't find clear pics with these poles in use. Nick Jr
 

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Hi Nick,
The poles are to go between the trucks, and hold the trucks in position under the log.

The cars (two bogies + log) are then coupled to the next car, this was a link and pin coupling, and you could have long links; later I think (health and safety rules) this was changed as link & pin are very dangerous!

The logs are chained to the trucks and on to the cross baulk that is on top of the bogie.

That has a fitting like a triangle that can slide in or out to the width of the log, and that also holds the chain.

The chain ends (one from each side) are generally joined with a stretcher, with a ratchet tensioner that pulls each each end together. These are still used today on motor trucks, and could be also used as a result on rr trucks with a load to hold it still.

Have a look at the following link; the truck show has the baulk across the width, and loops at each end that would accept the chains, that run over the logs
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http://www.rbadesign.net/TERRAPIN/MR_On3LoggingDisconnect.htm

Interestingly those trucks are passenger trucks: the reason is given at the bottom if the page - freight trucks would be cheaper and far more likely to be used!
 

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The poles are called "roosters" in the logging vernacular. They were made with varying lengths and were used both to join the disconnects under the logs, and to join sets of logs/disconnects to each other, especially if the logs extended out over the ends of the disconnects enough to preclude coupling the link and pins. They were also used to connect cars to locomotives, skeleton cars to disconnect sets, and just about anywhere a longer coupler reach was needed. They were even used to connect link and pin to knuckle couplers where the knuckle was slotted and drilled to accept link and pin matings. Loggers were nothing if not inventive. :)

To address your other point, there were times when the logs themselves were used as the car body and no rooster was used between the disconnects under the logs, but there were at least as many times where they were used. Practices varied from logging line to logging line, so almost anything you do probably had a prototype someplace. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Peter, Dwight, thank you very much for the information. Now to find some sutible branches and off they go. Nick Jr.
 
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