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Thanks for that info, all my G gauge is LGB engines and rolling stock, I do have some USA Trains rolling stock, wood reefers and wood box cars which are compatible to LGB scale. I would like to have a USA Train diesel engine or two, but do to there 1/29 scale they are under scale for my liking. I guess you could say LGB 1/22.5 scale is a dead scale as there is not much in production today in that scale, probably the Fn3 scale 1/20.3 scale would be a better fit for me, but since the Fn3 scale is mostly steam and I'm pretty much diesel at this time, Do note here, I also have an HOn3 layout, so I still model in steam.

trainman
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Well, the frame is busted beyond repair, so i am going to have to make a steel subframe to provide support and recess the motor blocks a bit.


Into the crucible it goes!
 

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I guess I just don't see that much damage, let me ask this question and don't take it serous, just an honest answer, is it beyond you skill level to repair this engine. If it is that's understandable as we all have limits to our ability to repair and do things. I guess what I'm saying is I really hate to see the frame and body being torn apart and replace with something else that may, or may not work. I wish you luck on your project, I hope it turns out well.

trainman
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
Curious how it got so banged up, did you find out if the fan was powered? thank you.
no sadly the fan was unpowwered. As far as the damage , im guessing the engine weighs around 11 lbs and seems to of been dropped from a height greater than 4ft . The type of cracks in the plastic seem to indicate that the plastic was cold when it hit.
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
I guess I just don't see that much damage, let me ask this question and don't take it serous, just an honest answer, is it beyond you skill level to repair this engine. If it is that's understandable as we all have limits to our ability to repair and do things. I guess what I'm saying is I really hate to see the frame and body being torn apart and replace with something else that may, or may not work. I wish you luck on your project, I hope it turns out well.

trainman
Good Points.
The damage to the frame includes complete breaks throughout and missing sections in areas around the bogie swivel supports . Just welding the plastic will not, in my opinion, be a strong enough solution. The metal frame upgrade will be much sturdier and allow the engine to sit lower over the motor blocks which will give it a more scale appearance.
IF the motor blocks were original lionel blocks i would seriously try to save the frame,, but the blocks are USA trains GP38II blocks that, when attached to the lionel stock mounting points, raises the engine far too high. Possibly one of the reasons it toppled, but im guessing on that.
 

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Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
This was inside of the engine, but not really connected to anything.
LGB American Diesel sounds

I may try to keep this and get it working.
From my research these things run about a hundred dollars even used.
 

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Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
Inspecting the USA trains Bogies. Some of the details are broken off or missing. However i think i can fabricate the missing parts.



While inspecting the motor blocks i found poor conductivity from one of the axles. It appears that the wire pickups have worn through. But that a easy fix i have a lot of spring wire.
 

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Any cracks in the plastic axle bushings? Very common failure in those trucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
Any cracks in the plastic axle bushings? Very common failure in those trucks.
I visibly did not see any... however that doesn't mean they are not there though.
I am thinking of doing the brass tube fix on the gears anyway.
The bushings on the bogie sides are badly worn though.
 

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Actually, it's more likely that those whiskers were burned through during a derailment... the ends look blued.... When there is a short through the wheels (like derailing on a switch), that contact area is so small that it overheats the wire there, and at least softens it, if not burns through.

But it does not really matter, they need replacing. Is power still being picked up at the axle tips? It's important not to rely on the whiskers only for power pickup, especially if you are not using the skates.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Actually, it's more likely that those whiskers were burned through during a derailment... the ends look blued.... When there is a short through the wheels (like derailing on a switch), that contact area is so small that it overheats the wire there, and at least softens it, if not burns through.

But it does not really matter, they need replacing. Is power still being picked up at the axle tips? It's important not to rely on the whiskers only for power pickup, especially if you are not using the skates.

Greg
Yes power is still being picked up on the axle tips, but they are so worn that the MM showed voltage drops on that axle.
im replcing the wire pickups with a bit thicker leaf spring wires that are from my printer and copier supplies, they are designed for continues use.
i actually do have oil impregnated bronze bushings but they cant be soldered to so i would have to add a washer to solder to.
 

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you can get the replacement journal bearings/bushings from USA trains, the better fit will help conductivity.

cheap guy tip: if you look at those bushings in the side frames, they will be worn on one side only (because the weight of the loco is supported by the axle tips.

You can use a pair of pliers to rotate the bushings 90 degrees (or at least 180 degrees) and it's like having a new bearing.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #35
you can get the replacement journal bearings/bushings from USA trains, the better fit will help conductivity.

cheap guy tip: if you look at those bushings in the side frames, they will be worn on one side only (because the weight of the loco is supported by the axle tips.

You can use a pair of pliers to rotate the bushings 90 degrees (or at least 180 degrees) and it's like having a new bearing.

Greg
Great tips! Thank You.
 

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Noob, USA Trains has complete side frames with bushings, very reasonable price if you are so inclined. Looks like that loco has been 'around the belt and through the buckle'. Bluing on the pick ups could also be from normal arching after they wore down, great idea using wipers in place of just spring wire.
 

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Get some phosphor bronze strip, a bit wider, more contact area. The whiskers are a weak point.

If you look at the Piko parts store, you will see that is what they use.


note: you can't go quite that wide, not that much room, but I bet you could buy these and modify them easily

Greg
 

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Noob, second thought: first check if you have the room to add wipers. Some wheel axle assemblies do have side to side play on curves.
 
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