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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The good basic advice throughout this forum is to build with the largest radius curves you can at all times.

Many beginners have limited space and budgets and are often looking for track plans to get started building a layout and running something while they move forward with the big dream empire. Here's a link to Micro/Small Layouts for Model Railroads. It's one of my favorite sites that I visit often for great ideas - http://carendt.us/index.html They're adding new material all the time and bursting with creativity. Don't miss the "Scrapbook" section.


Any other favorites and sources of inspiration for limited space - track plans?
 

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No trackplan is limited enough for my space
 

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Webber,

While this isn't a direct answer to your G-gauge specific request, here's a path I'm taking due to limited space/$$. With the help of several savvy members of this board and the GR one, I concluded that I could run three gauges in the space available: G (45mm) O, and S. Keeping my chosen scale of F (1:20.3) for all gauges, I could fit in tight radii and hence, more track. It works out to be Fn3, Fn2, and Fn18"--I think! 3', 2' & 18" narrow gauge in F scale. That last is the S gauge track.

How it works--in my head at least--is that I have (and wanted) a point to point layout with lots of transfer, thus switching operations. I happen not to be one who likes to watch a train run in a circle. Just a genetic defect, I suppose. So the 18" gauge is located in and around the lead mine, the 2' is for the logging operation, and the 3' is the SL between these industries and a fictional standard gauge. Note that the O gauge (2') is going to be dual gauge with part of the G gauge mainline. (I just wanted it that way).

So, it's a different approach than usually is found. Oh, and I'm a scratchbuilder. I set the era ca 1875 (1845-1899) so I could use strap-iron rail and not have to pay the exhorbitant price of brass or the other metals. This allows a wide range of equipment styles, though I actually prefer small 2 axle cars and critters or 0-4-0's.

Les
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Marko - That's funny. I was going to point to the thortrains.net Gmini page. It has about 10 plans that have been converted from one scale to another up to G. Good stuff as a starting point, but limited number of ideas. Some of the layouts start small but balloon up to pretty large size quickly. Anyway, I guess great minds run on the same track. - Web
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Les -

I'm developing my plans in the same time frame and price range (unless I get some gifts or donations). I'm looking forward to scratch building. (I am happy to learn of sources for supplies, kits to bash, etc.). My layout will have some space, but it will have real limits too (due to other uses, nearby creek, etc.). I'm planning on going with F scale standard gauge with Fn3 dual gauge track in some sections for guests.

Please share what you're working on - pictures, ideas, sources, whatever. If you want to start another thread, let me know what it is, so I can follow along. Thanks.

P.S. I'm modeling a section of Camden & Amboy prototype (in NJ). Stevens invented the iron "inverted T" rail, spike, and wood tie, system in 1831 and first applied it in the C&A as an American substitute for the strap iron on top of wooden rails, or iron rails, bolted to stone sleepers used in England.

I'm deviating from the C&A prototype in this section by having standard and 3 foot dual gauge. I'm making a command decision against an exact model of prototype in favor of having a more accommodating layout. I think model railroading can be very sociable and want to make it easy to have guests.
 

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Web

I don't have anything built yet. I've been over a year trying to get our house and my wife's business relocated/reworked, and flood damage to my home/her business repaired. So I've had lots of time to think. I'm a retired tool & diemaker, so I have a good amount of confidence in my 'plans' and abilities

I'd be very happy to open a thread on this subject, but I'd like to leave that to you as I'm pretty much computer illiterate.

As for plans in writing, I have none, since I worked from engineering sketches rather than blueprints. Anyway, too much advance planning can lock one in. My benchwork will be openframe, the 'zero elevation' of the track will be about 3" above the benchwork, thus allowing for 'dips' and 'fall away' terrain. The 45 mm SL main will climb towards the mine past the logging site (which has the O gauge track for dual trackage) to the 18" mine tracks. The layout will be U shaped in a 22ft x 12ft room, with the possibility of a 'peninsula' in the middle. Two operators, max. DC block control. PP. I'll use wooden rails with strap iron (copper wire, flattened) and stub switches. These last will save a great deal of money. I have a number of pixes collected I can share with you that pertain to the earlier era of RRing. I'll also have turntables at each end. They're not difficult to build. I intend initially to hand power mine, but might motorize in the future.

One thing I want is animated trackside structures. These will be designed and built on an as-need basis.

Each of the three sites will be developed to suit, with their own gauges. I'm looking forward to the mine, particularly, as a good deal of trackage can be put down to serve the mine's needs.

Then there's the trans-shipment opportunities for switching and whatnot.

Lots of ideas, no nails driven, yet.

Les
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow that was a fast reply. I'll open a thread and let you know. You're right. As a retired tool and die maker I have no doubt you've got the skills and experience to make a fine railroad. Sorry to hear about the flood and hope you can restore/recover. I've been into a lot of things. You might want to try a test piece with copper foil strips with adhesive on the back. These strips come in rolls to serve the stained glass field. (I used to do stained glass.) It has great conductivity, good adhesive,and is fairly durable. My guess is that it would hold up well to the standard train track eraser to keep it clean. (Word to the wise, wear some gloves or put bandaids on a few fingers first because the thin foil can slice skin pretty easily.)
This material is available from numerous sources. Here's a link to give you an idea what I'm talking about

http://www.delphiglass.com
search for copper foil
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi All and Les

I set up a new thread in the forum under Model making>
"F scale, multigauge projects"

To follow along with Les on his projects
 
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