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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I got two LGB switch machines from a friend along with the control box.  
I want to use the machines from my coustom control panel, an so do not want to use the LGB control box.

The LGB machines have only two wires White and Orange, I am familiar with the machines with three wires and have no problem wiring them to momentary switches on my panel.

How do I do it when there are only two wires?  I want to use two monmentary contact switches to control each machine.  

Thanks for looking and any help!!
 

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Bill,
I did just what you are asking about with a DPDT momentary-center off switch from Radio Shack.  You have to cross wire the switch across two poles.  This was done several years ago and I don't remember just how I did it.  Tomorrow, I will try to take a picture of the backside of the switch wiring for you.

Also, the LGB switch motors work well with the Aristo remote switch receiver 55475/55475.
Jim Carter
 

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LGB switch machines need DC. One polarity flips it one way, the other polarity flips it back. So the power output, if AC, needs diodes to convert to DC. The double solenoid type machines require three wires and can use either AC of DC.

If already DC, on the back of a momentary DPDT switch you will find six contacts. The middle lugs on each side can be attached to either the switch machine or the dc power supply. The outer lugs must be connected in an X fashion to each other and then connected to the 'other thingy' (the one you didn't connect the middle contacts to).

Doesn't make any diffenence whether the middle contacts go to what; just being consistent would be good advice.

Art
 

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The LGB switch machine, does not use a Solinoid, but instead uses a Motor, so when power is supplied to it it drives the switch over, just like a train the motor goes one way or the other. I use an old toy train controller turned down to 8 volts wired thru a DPDT switch as described above, they work very well, too much voltage and they chatter, each summer I disassemble each machine and regrease the drive and give each a general clean up, and they are ready for a another season of operation.
 

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Posted By Dan Pierce on 02/07/2008 4:52 AM
A Single Pole Double throw (SPDT) momentary switch with 2 diodes is all that is needed to operate the LGB EPL drives, or Aristo units.

Link to the training dutchman's site with many good wiring diagrams.

http://www.altek.nl/graphtips/EPLsturing.gif


This is definitely the better way to do it.  It is not a "true" dc but really half-wave ac.  While true dc will drive the machines with less voltage even, if the toggle sticks, you can burn out the turnout motor.  At half-wave ac, if the toggle sticks, the motor can take it no problemo because half the time it is actually resting.

What Dan didn't mention is that you would be using an ac source through the two diodes and not dc.

This is probably about the best info on the web on these things.

http://www.trainweb.org/girr/tips/tips1/lgb_1600.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks to all for the help. and Todd for the comprehensive web liink. I now have them up and running just fine!!


Again many thanks.
 

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I use this diagram on our console.   Very easy to make... 

 

Its Half wave off of  the16 -24v A/C 60hz cyc.  And doesn't hurt the D/C Switch Motor.   Now its converted to about  8 - 12v D/C,  plus or minus for motor direction with either one of your momentary connections. 

I went to Radio Shack and picked up a package of Red momentary push button SW.  and a couple of Diodes and you are in business.. ( Note: One Diodes goes one way and the other one goes in the opposite direction. )  
Then find an old train  transformer  or  use off of your A/C  accessory  terminals on your pack :rolleyes:
Happy R.R. 
 

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You need to change the polarity of the current to throw the switch in each of the two directions. I guess you could use a momentary toggle switch with DC to change the polarity. It must be momentary. Otherwise if you pass to much current for too long you will burn out the coils.

Use the AC taps on your power supply (most power supplies have them) and get an LGB switch control box.

Chuck
 

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Hi, If my power supply to LGB switch machines is DC, are the diodes required?
Cheers,
Chris

Assuming you mean the LGB switch control box, it won't work. The turnouts would only throw in one direction and you would have to "hand throw" them back the other way.

But to power individual turnouts, you can use dc with the momentary dpdt switches and a "crossover pattern" on the switches wires, as noted before.
 

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To make the DPDT switch work, you set it up to do one polarity to throw one way, and reverse the DC polarity to throw the other way, it's really wired like a direction switch in a throttle, just that you need a momentary switch, since the LGB motors will not take continuous power.

Greg
 

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Chris

The LGB number is 51750 and according to one dealer it is no longer being made. Ebay shows several ranging from about $30.00 to about $90.00.

A momentary DPDT, will probably be your best bet.

A couple of questions about your layout. Are you indoors or out? How many switches are you planning to use? Are you planning to do a lot of switching, or just occasionally? What part of the country are you building your layout, if outdoors?

I ask this because when I lived in Denver, I had a number of electric switch machines (LGB) and used the 51750. It worked very nicely, no problems on my outdoor layout. I installed them when we moved to Virginia. It wasn't long before I took them out and replaced them with manual throws. The high humidity and greater rainfall played havoc on the switch motors. The iron parts rusted and they filled with dirt and insect nests.

I don't do much switching so manual is fine. I'm using home made throws. A piece of brass rod and a couple of spikes is all I need. All of my switches are along one side of the layout, so they are within relatively easy reach.

Here is a picture of what I do. To throw the switch all you need to do is move the rod from one spike head to the other.






John, aka Totalwrecker, has a different, but equally simple manual homemade throw.

If you are building your layout indoors, you can ignore all the above.

Chuck

PS, I notice that you have only a couple of posts, both are in old dead threads. You might do better starting a new thread, than opening up an old one. You've gotten responses on this one, but you questions about smoke units went unanswered. Just a suggestion.
 
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