G Scale Model Train Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am planning at least one reverse loop to be used with battery operated trains. I have the LGB 16150/16050 and 18150/18050 manual switches and I wonder if derailments will be a problem when the train returns in the opposite direction of the way the switch is set? I have about converting to a spring switch but did not know if this is necessary with these manual switches?
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
It all depends on the weight of the cars and engine. The size of the flange might also come into play. I do not have any problems with LGB rolling stock passing through a closed switch. I can't say the same for other manufacturers stock. I have trouble with Pilot trucks on Accucraft and Bachmann engines and lighter (kit-wooden) cars.

Chuck
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
I've found I can run locomotive-first through a closed switch, and the weight of the locomotive is sufficient to "push" the points aside. However, backing the train through does tend to derail it. At least, lighter wagons derail; adding weight to the last wagon of a train would probably be sufficient to stop the derailing.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
761 Posts
It all depends on the weight of the cars and engine. Chuck
This is my experience, too. I have a lightweight Hartland Mac (with half the weight removed) that couldn't cut a switch no matter what, and an LGB Mallet that has no problems. I'm slowly switching over to electrically controlled switches, but for the moment I only send the Mallet through against the switch. The LGB Stainz locos seem quite heavy, but at least twice I've tried to have one cut a switch and had it derail. Eggliners are right out.

Note that these switches were bought used and have been outside for who knows how long. They are rather "stiff" because of this.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
Both generations of the LGB manual switch throws, older rectangular and newer square housing, are spring switched. That is they always return to the preset,closed, position after each axle or truck clears the points.

The LGB EPL switch motors move the points with the first set of wheels and stay in the new position after the train passes.

Chuck
 

· Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Rethinking reversing Loops

I now occurs to me that the cost installing of an additional parallel track would be worth the loss of aggravation from worrying about derailments at the switches and collisions between trains on the loops! The fun of just letting your trains run "freely" sounds enticing and creating a working rail yard would satisfy the need for rail operations. It will mean an extra 120' of straight track and the same amount of masonry work to widen the top of the brick retaining wall to accommodate the parallel tracks. Another plan change...but for the better I believe.

Now, back to landscape work!
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
I think that you have made a good choice. If your goal is to run trains, watch and enjoy them with a minimum of supervision, you are good.

Your climate is worse than mine. When I lived in Colorado, I had automatic switches and signals. No problems. When I moved o Virginia I tried it again. Not good, the switch motors rusted and filled with ant nests and mud. I now have all manual switches.

Chuck
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top