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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I've been at it again.
I couldn't resist the allure of building a complete string of LGB passenger cars to go with my LGB mogul.
I've had the Queen Mary series LGB Drover's Caboose for a couple of years now.
I also have another LGB coach that was painted Pullman Green by its' previous owner. It was bought on Ebay around 2-3 years ago.
I then upgraded it to LED lighting .
I put it in a box,and it's now buried in the garage, and I can' seem to find it...
Which brings me to the new string of cars that I just finished working on.
They are all LGB, and there is one each of the following : a combine #212,two coaches #3080, a Baggage car,an excursion car, and the Queen Mary 4175 Drovers Caboose.
I believe that the excursion car is the only one that was made in China. All others were made in West Germany. All, with the exception of the baggage and excursion cars, are lighted via track power.
Here's a video that I posted to my youtube channel earlier today. It shows the combine and one of the coaches (after I finished the final lighting project) ,along with the caboose.
I'll post a video of the entire train after I locate the missing coach.
I know it's out there.
Somewhere...
 

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I've been meaning to do the same (add LED lighting) to my LGB coaches/drovers caboose. The LGB 212 looks a lot thinner as compared to the 3080 and the drovers caboose, allowing light to shine through.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Maybe a coat of black paint inside will keep the light from shining through the body?

Greg
I've given that a bit of thought, Greg.
I've come to the conclusion that painting the insides isn't going to work for me as I'm concerned about paint over spray getting past the masking tape.
While I've found that over spray isn't as big an issue with an airbrush as it is with a rattle can, it can still happen,requiring cleanup.
Cleanup could damage the factory finish on the outside of the car. I've had that happen before,and wasn't very pleased with the results.
Using a brush isn't an option, as it leaves brush strokes ,and I hate brush strokes.
I'm just going to leave them as-is,and put up with the light bleed through.
 

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I've given that a bit of thought, Greg.
I've come to the conclusion that painting the insides isn't going to work for me as I'm concerned about paint over spray getting past the masking tape.
Can't you just lined the interior with wide masking tape or similar.

Though my initial reaction was that oil lamps in an 1890s coach would never look so bright. On one of my coach builds, I put a dummy wooden cover over the LEDs with 2/3rds of them hidden. I recently found some LEDs already set up with wires between each pair, so my next build can have a mere 6 - 8 LEDs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Both of you present interesting ideas.
I forgot about using aluminum foil as a way to block light bleed in models.
I've been toying around with the simple idea of painting over the LED's with white nail polish.
That should diffuse and dim them.
At least a little bit.
I'm going to see how well that works on the combine, and then,if it works, I'll do the coach.
I'll let you know how it goes.
Oh, It turns out that the combine is the car that was made in China.
That might account for the lights shining through the walls.
Maybe.
 

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What heat? Most LEDs other than high power flashlights run cold, at least cool.

Also, a simple current limiting resistor is much more effective than controlling voltage.

Your suggestions are appropriate for incandescent light bulbs, not LEDs.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Let me start with a photo essay of all three cars at power settings beginning at minimum voltage,50% power (around 9v),and 100% power(about 18v).
Please note the differences between all 3 cars.
First up is the coach. It hasn't been altered in any way. Note that the light bleed problem with this car is minimal.
The combine is next ,and as you can see, it has a sever light bleed issue.
Next we come to the drovers' caboose. This car has been altered since the video I posted last night.
it had a moderate light bleed issue, but I broke down earlier today, and painted the interior using a medium brush ,and Createx 6002 Black sealer Auto Air Colors .
Which is basically a primer.
I chose to brush paint the interior of the caboose as an experiment to see how it would work.
Even though I am not a fan of visible brush strokes, I must concede that the experiment was a success.
I also reasoned that any brush strokes would not be visible from outside the car.
Out of sight,out of mind,eh? Window Wood Rectangle Amber Building
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Unfortunately, I neglected to paint the interior of the cupola. But I can take care of that later.
Also of note, the lighting system in the caboose is an after market lighting kit that I bought on Ebay a couple of years ago.This kit is made specifically for the LGB Drovers' caboose.
I believe that the best way to dim these LED's would be voltage limiting resistors installed on the power wires between the bridge rectifier and the LED's.
I may have to try resistors in several voltages to get the level of illumination down to a more authentic level for cars of this period.
My guess for a minimum would put it at 5-7 volts.
Thoughts gentlemen?
Thanks !
 

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I also reasoned that any brush strokes would not be visible from outside the car.
Quite. But you can also use an interior color that fits the car - coaches were usually wood panelled so paint them with brown primer. Hey, you may end up with a fully-detailed interior.
My guess for a minimum would put it at 5-7 volts.
I often run 12V LED strings on 9v from the regular radio battery. They are still pretty bright.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
I've seen the interiors of the real D&RGW cars in Durango, Co. They are indeed wood paneled. Some of them quite intricately.
It would be just about impossible to even come close to completely detailing these LGB cars to be anywhere close to the real thing.
So, no more painting of the LED's.
And no further detailing of the cars themselves. The only exception would be the walls on the combine to stop light from bleeding through.
I have powered the LED's that I use in my cars with a 9v battery. You're right. They still are pretty bright. Still too bright to represent old style electric lights from the period that I'm trying to represent.
That's why I was thinking 5 - 7 volts.
And I was pretty close.
With a little experimentation using 4 AA cell 1.5 volt batteries ( joined together with masking tape 1 at a time), I learned that the LED's come on when the voltage reaches approximately 6 volts.
This produced a nice glow without being super bright like the LED's are currently.
Now that I've found the right voltage, the question that I have to ask myself is if it would be worth tearing into every single passenger car in my possession in order to achieve a more authentic light level in all of them.
I currently have over 20 passenger cars ,of various brands, road names, and sizes.
It would be a lot of work, and right now, my answer is going to be to leave them as-is.
At least for now.
Probably forever.
And going back to battery operation for the lights is completely out of the question . This is mostly due to the all of the extra hours of work the conversion would entail, the extra expense of buying parts to reconvert the cars backwards, and the high cost of the batteries themselves.


Thanks Pete !
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I went ahead and painted the inside of the combine car black.
It certainly did wonders to stop the light from bleeding through the walls.
I wish that I didn't have to do that, but c'est la vie.
Funny how the coach has so very little light bleed by comparison with the combine...
 

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Now that the black is blocking the light you could put a second coat of paint on the walls. Perhaps a brown that would look like stained wood, or any interior color you wanted. Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
OK. Here's the photos of the newly darkened combine.I plan on leaving the interiors of this, and the other cars painted black. Less work, and less chance of damaging the wiring for the lights !
Let me know what you think !
Andrew
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