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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a LGB 65001 sound generator. It worked fine when I ran DCC but now I only use it in my Xmas train which is analog DC. The issue is the train is running full speed but the sound tempo is real slow, like one chuff per foot of track. I tried resetting it to defaults but there was no change. Is there a way to speed up the chuff tempo for Analog running?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dan,

Thank you. Yes. 255 is the default but I also programmed all the CVs individually just in case. I did find in the 6500x manual (I was originally using the 65001 manual that came with the unit), that CV64 sets the analog chuff rate. I set it to the fastest setting of 9. It helped but it is still slow, like maybe half speed. I guess that is the best I will get. That manual states that I can select 2 or 4 chuffs but does not state how. I tried looking in old 550xx series MTS manuals for additional CV info but could not find it.

Dan
 

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I have a LGB 65001 sound generator. It worked fine when I ran DCC but now I only use it in my Xmas train which is analog DC. The issue is the train is running full speed but the sound tempo is real slow, like one chuff per foot of track. I tried resetting it to defaults but there was no change. Is there a way to speed up the chuff tempo for Analog running?
Hi - Below is what I have posted on my Website for adjusting the chuff rate for your locomotive to operate in DC Analog power mode.

PROCEDURE FOR ADJUSTING THE LGB SOUND MODULES TO SYNC THE STEAM CHUFF SOUNDS WITH THE LOCOMOTIVE’S WHEELS REVOLUTIONS

There are two CV settings for adjusting the chuff sounds on the LGB 65001 Sound Module. To set CVs on the Module, just like any DCC/DC decoder requires even when operating it in DC Analog power, you must use a DCC command station or a PC Programming Module, such as the Massoth PC Programming Module, or a MD Electronics PC Module……I sell both as listed on my Website. Consult the LGB Sound Module User Guide for these settings for operating it in DC Analog power.

First, if you don’t already have one installed, I recommend installing the LGB 65011 Power Storage Unit (Power Caps) that plugs into one of the sockets in the Sound Module. I sell them for $80 plus shipping. Once the Power Caps are charged up after operating your locomotive for a few minutes, you will notice that when your locomotive comes to a stop, you will continue to hear the steam sounds, and one of the two automatic sounds will usually activate such as steam release or coal shoveling. Then when you start your locomotive again, the Power Caps will activate the sounds at the same time since sound decoders require a minimum of about 9 volts before they turn on. With the Power Caps, you will also hear the one whistle blast when the locomotive starts. Without using them, your locomotive will start moving for a while until the Sound Module receives the minimum voltage to start, and you will not hear the automatic whistle sounds.

CV193 Start Threshold Analog: Factory Default Setting 128; change it to 1 – 30 range. Sometimes 30 will be sufficient to sync the chuff sounds with a Mogul’s wheels revolutions. But I’ve also found using 1 works better. Try one of the settings to see what works best.
If after changing CV193 you still don’t have the chuff sounds in sync, you can then change CV2, Start Up Voltage. The Factory Default is 2; if you change it to 1, then in theory the Sound Module is start to activate with less voltage. If you change it to 2 -5 range, then it requires more voltage to start. Again, something you can experiment with. Note the demonstration video on my Website's Home Page of an LGB Mogul that I installed the LGB 65001 Sound Module into the tender; the CV193=30 setting produces a great 4 chuffs per locomotive wheel revolution.

If you want to use a Hall/Chuff Sensor to create the chuff sounds, then you need to change CV195 Factory Default Setting 0 to 4. But again, you will still not hear any sounds when the locomotive first starts or stops unless you also install the LGB 65011 Power Storage Unit (Power Caps) as I previously explained.

Those are the basic changes that should help get your Sound Module to be in sync with the locomotive’s wheels revolutions, or certainly to improve it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I tried setting CV 2=1 and CV 193 = 30, 15 and 1. I cannot tell much of a difference in chuff rate.
On the test track at full throttle, the chuff rate sounds good. Might synch well with a Mogul. But my Stainz-type loco is racing around the track at full throttle and the chuff is not.

I wish someone made an easy to install Chuff sensor.
 

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Okay, there's another CV196 Steam Stroke Duration. Default is 28, Range 0 - 32. The higher number slows the chuff, so you need to lower the setting to speed up the chuff. Just try dropping the settings and the test the chuff speed until you find the right setting for your loco.
 

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Where is your LGB Sound Module installed.....a box or passenger trailing train car?

The below Chuff Sensor device is easier to install since the round magnet comes in two halves.....no need to remove the wheels and axle to install this one.....I have them available.
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
The sound module is mounted in a Bachmann Reindeer stock car I place behind the tender.
That looks just like what the doctor ordered.
I am looking at your website now to see if there are any other cool things I might need.
 

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The sound module is mounted in a Bachmann Reindeer stock car I place behind the tender.
I am looking at your website now to see if there are any other cool things I might need.
If you open up the sound module and remove the board's connection to the dinky speaker inside it, and then solder the module's sound wires to a larger speaker properly mounted, then the sound quality will improve 100%. You'll probably have to solder extension wires onto the sound module's two blue speaker wires.

Be mindful of the speaker's polarity + and - connections to the speaker......you can verify what the blue wires are by looking at their connections to the module's speaker what will be marked with + and -.
 

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Also baffle the speaker. I place a cap from a laundry bottle on the rear of small speakers and the sound improvement is awesome. I also added foam to the inside of the laundry cap. I do not care about speaker polarity when using a single speaker as it makes no difference in the sound. It does matter a lot when using 2 or more speakers as the sound waves can cancel each other out.
 

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Also baffle the speaker. I place a cap from a laundry bottle on the rear of small speakers and the sound improvement is awesome. I also added foam to the inside of the laundry cap. I do not care about speaker polarity when using a single speaker as it makes no difference in the sound. It does matter a lot when using 2 or more speakers as the sound waves can cancel each other out.
I haven't used a rear cover on a locomotive's speaker installation for the last several years. I find the location of the speaker's placement, such as the rear water/fuel bunker of an LGB Forney, provides the necessary sound resonance without needing to cover the rear of the speaker. Same with a speaker in an LGB Mogul's tender, LGB Uintah, etc. The really critical aspect of locomotive speaker installation is to ensure the metal frame of the speaker is sealed onto the base it's mounted on. I use epoxy putty to do that if necessary, even use it to hold the speaker in place in tight spaces where screw mounts won't work......see photos below of an LGB 2085D Mallet; LGB 23881 Uintah; and LGB 2219S Mogul. Note: In Photo #1 I used epoxy putty to hold and seal the speaker in place; Photo #2 putty covers portions outside the speaker's frame; Photo #3 putty seals the openings around the speaker frame. If you want the best possible sound quality, these detailed install techniques will help.....of course the quality of the sound produced by the decoder and its installed sound file is also important to achieving the best possible locomotive sounds.

You can see and hear demos of LGB locomotives that I've converted to DCC sound decoders with outstanding sound quality, none of which has a speaker cover on the rear of the speaker. So, don't expend the extra time and effort to do so unless it's really needed for the specific install.
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have tried changing CVs 193 and 195. I get nothing. I'm not sure my NCE system is actually programming this 65001. I have tried using the programming track and on the Main. Nothing I do seems to matter.
 

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I have tried changing CVs 193 and 195. I get nothing. I'm not sure my NCE system is actually programming this 65001. I have tried using the programming track and on the Main. Nothing I do seems to matter.
I have tried changing CVs 193 and 195. I get nothing. I'm not sure my NCE system is actually programming this 65001. I have tried using the programming track and on the Main. Nothing I do seems to matter.
Can't you read the settings of the changed CVs with your DCC system to confirm they took effect?
 

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Sometimes the readback failures are due to current being low or marginal.
Make sure that all functions are off when reading a decoder to minimize current draw.
My Zimo test fixture has a very small motor and led lights for testing.
My command station has adjustable current output.
When reading from systems that have DC running enabled, turn this off to read decoders as the stretched pulse can give false info.
 

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If I get a decoder that cannot be read back in service mode with either my NCE or my Zimo system, I get rid of it. I don't trust screwy hardware that does not meed minimum NMRA operations of reading and writing CVs.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I dug out my old MTS II system. I have to figure out how to hook it up and use it as it has been years and I remember there are some quirks to programming with it.

This sound module is about 20 years old. Not sure when NMRA standards came about.
 
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