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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

New member here returning to the hobby after 20 years. Is there a specific recommended motor when building large scale locomotives from scratch? In my limited research I see builders using Pittman motors but never have seen a motor number listed or come across a source. Looking at Ebay at Pittman motors do you buy a motor with a gear reduction or build a gear box from scratch? I know usual approach was to use motor blocks from other models but there are not many American 1920s locomotive styles available. I would like to scratchbuild an CNJ Camelback Atlantic at some point. Right now I think I could use an Lionel Atlantic since the drivers are close in size and would just need to scratch build a shell.

Rick
 

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Hi Rick. New to the forums also, but not new to the hobby. I have scratch built several locos. If you are modeling a diesel, you can actually order a two axle geared drive with motor and power pickups from USA Trains / Charles RO. I prefer the NW2 motor truck, but the GP-38 motor truck is also good. The part for that is USA R22-12. If you are scratch building a Steam Loco, I have used Bachmann can motors and gear boxes with drive wheel. You could also order a motor from LGB or USA Trains which has a worm gear on both sides.
 

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do you buy a motor with a gear reduction
There are not a lot of folk building new locos from scratch - some live steamers (e.g. Bill Allen) do a fabulous job in the machine shop, but hardly any electric types.
I once made a complete 2-8-0 chassis using a Bachmann 4-6-0 motor and gearbox, 4-6-0 wheels and 2 strips of brass; essentially the same technique as used in the smaller scales. (I did not attempt to cut out the areas that would have been open in the prototype.)
As noted in the previous psot, you can buy a complete motor and gearbox from Bachmann and other suppliers. This is the motor from the Bachmann C-19, which is generally admired.
Motor & Gearbox (Large C-19) [831X-MOTOR-10193] - $66.20 : Bachmann Trains Online Store!
There are a variety of suitable Pittman motors with gearboxes. You could ask Rich Yoder which motor went in to the model of EBT #14/15 that RYM produced some years ago. There's a thread here on what motor might be suitable for a Lional Atlandtic: (I googled "site:mylargescale.com pittman". There are several threads that will be of interest to you.)

I think the Lionel Atlantic would be a good place to start - rather than scratchbuilding, there have been lots of "bashes" of existing locos. Nowadays the parts just get 3D printed. Oh - and there are lots of threads about 'improving' it with new pilot wheels, etc.
Pittman motor
 

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I'm not as enthusiastic about starting from a Lionel Atlantic, as parts are hard to come by, and the side rods are fragile and so are the crankpins molded into the drivers. I do have one, and was able to get some replacement parts a few years ago, but buying these used can be a crap shoot on what you get.

You might have to buy a couple to the the parts you need.

I have some information about this loco, and the things you should do to prevent damage:

Please note there are THREE additional sub pages on the Atlantic, links at the bottom of the main page.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Greg,

Thank you for the post. I have read your site many times. I choose the Atlantic for the driver size and the cylinders being similar. Does anyone make similar size drivers?

Rick
 

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No, unless some of the Thomas the Train has some, just guessing wildly... Not many Atlantics out there. They can be made reliable, I also listed the part numbers I believe, perhaps there are some NOS suppliers out there.

I see them for sale on eBay all the time, around $200 but almost always have damage..

Best of luck, Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Greg,

I have an Atlantic I picked up years ago. Someone did a nice job of detailing it. Right now it is down due to a cracked driver pin. I could copy the drivers by using one as a casting mold. Other idea is just to make my own.

Rick
 

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The crankpin is what I referred to in post #4.... very hard to repair, perhaps getting a threaded standoff and epoxy it into the driver, the most common failure, and hardest to repair.

Too much going on today to go look, but I thought it was a plastic wheel with a metal tire, 3d printing would come to mind and add the tire.

Greg
 

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Greg,

Thanks for the help. I would have to farm out the 3d printing. I have a lathe, mill and CNC router in the shop but have no experience with the 3d printing.
 

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making the spokes is a little tricky, but if you have a CNC setup I'd give it a try, perhaps start with a disc of Delrin.

Greg
 

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Too much going on today to go look, but I thought it was a plastic wheel with a metal tire, 3d printing would come to mind and add the tire.
I strongly suggest you review the wheels sold by Slaters Plastikard in the UK. I have bought several of these, and they are excellent quality, with nylon spokes, stainless tires, and a squared brass boss to fit the axle. Crankpins are included.
Slater's Plastikard - Wheels

60843


These are scale 49" wheels in F scale (1:20.3). Slaters 16mm wheels are 1:19, so you can probably find something useful there, or on the Gauge-3 list (1:22.5.) It does require some math to figure out the best fit for your loco. For example, a
"G3872ST 6' 0" 19 Spoke Driving Wheel (LMS Class 5)"
in Gauge 3 (1:22.5) is 3.2" in diameter, which is pretty big. (Gauge 3 is 64mm gauge - be sure to ask for gauge-1 45mm axles if you end up finding something that will fit.)
 
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