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Posted By jmkling on 01/18/2008 5:47 PM
Just taked to Royce, Accucraft is taking orders /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/w00t.gif, retail Price is $4750 /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/whistling.gif, price is good til 11/1/08.  $400 Deposit.  Don't know if they are offering any early order discount.  More info to follow when I see Royce at cabin fever.


Jon:
The K-36 is priced like the Cab Forward with a preorder price lower than the final price; preorder requires a $400 non-refundable deposit.  The preorder price is $4500 and the final price $4750.  I'd seen this somewhere but to verify I called Accucraft and confirmed the info, the deadline for the preorders is 11/1/08 so still plenty of time.
 

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Posted By jmkling on 01/23/2008 4:33 PM


Chris,


I posted the product annuncement in another post that had the updated info, thanks for confirming.  I got my order in already, don't expect to see in till 2009 sometime.



I knew I'd seen an announcement somewhere.
 

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Long long ago... the main problem identified with Accucraft Lubricator was they simply put out way too much steam oil - the hole in the steam pipe attached to the lubricator was just way too big. I think the first solution to this by Dave Hottmann was a simple restrictor that significantly reduced the amount of steam oil output by the lubricator. I've run a couple of locos where this was done and was surprised at the dramatic drop in steam oil coming out of the stack and the lack of crackle and pop of steam oil hitting the hot stack and burning.

Others put a piece of wire in the steam pipe hole to reduce the functional area of the hole. Still another used a short piece brass tube with a slit in it that could be enlarged or reduced in di to find the sweet spot that limited the flow of steam oil from the steam pipe hole (th slit ws not positioned at the steam ppe hole).

The superheater/steam oil problem was found to be primarily a function of the excessive steam oil, so reducing the amount of steam oil also significantly reduce if not eliminated th superhetaer/steam oil problem - the potential of steam oil coking the superheater. Notwithstanding restricting the amount of steam oil, few have reported the coking problem actually happening. I think this can be attributed to the fact that a locomotive rarely stands motionless with the burners cranked up, and in particular when it is standing, even if the burner is turned up, there is no steam flowing because the throttle is closed. Additionally, if the poker burners are converted to radiant burners following Kevin O'Connors design, the sleeve on the burner can be rotated so the radiant flame is angled away from the superheater. If you look at the Informative Threads sticky topic "Solving My Ruby Burner Problems: - 510kb" is shows the radiant burner angling away from the superheater.

As far as Tallow being a bad component of steam oil, both Harry Wade's article sighted above and Kevin O'Connor article "Notes from the Unit Shop", Kevin O'Connor's advice for the beginning small scale live steamer, "STEAM OIL SELECTION" (also in the Southern Steam Trains Reference section) both refer to 4-6% non-acidic tallow or tallow substitute being a fundamental and necessary component of steam oil. Kevin's specfic advice was, "The grade of recommended steam cylinder oil for these conditions is ISO 460 which contains 4% tallow oil. This is the grade of oil that the “ride-on” locomotive community uses."

Bypassing the superheater might be an ideal solution, but from reports of 90% of the problem solved simply by significantly reducing, or metering, the steam oil output of the Accucraft factory installed lubricator or installing a metered lubricator the superheater steam oil bypass seems much less necessary (if needed at all), not to mention a considerable amount of extra work for relatively little benefit (5-10%) compared to fixing (or replacing) the lubricator- IMHO.

Metered lubricators that are a direct or near direct replacement are available from a number of sources: Cole Power Models, PM Research, etc. (If a list of suppliers is needed I can post it with links but I am assuming you are all familiar with the usual suspects.) One particular model of replacement lubricator has what I think is a useful feature, the oil vessel is glass so you can see the oil vs water content. It's been awhile since I searched for them but I believe all of these replacement lubricators have a needle valve through the center of the Lubricator. You will have to make a Tee steam ppe connection to any of these. For comparison, I had a few custom lubricators made for me; they cost over $100 each. The off the shelf variety are around $50-$60. (but that was two years ago so the exchange rate may mean they are higher now.)

One caveat, the Accucraft lubricator has very thick walls therefore hold a much smaller amount of steam oil than it would appear. A replacement lubricator can be smaller yet contain approximately the same amount of steam oil. With the additional benefit from a metered lubricator saving steam oil, the steam oil will last just as long as the Accucraft lubricator in not much longer. Accucraft has two sizes of lubricators; a smaller one for the Shays, Ruby's and other small locos; and a larger one for the K's, etc.

Not all C-16's have a dead leg lubricator in the form of a tank under the running board (#268 and I believe one other, maybe Bubble Bee, have standard Accucraft lubricators - I have a Black #268 C-16.) There was a particular thread some time ago on modifying the C-16 dead leg lubricator due to an inherent problem as designed.

A google search on steam oil will provide the usual long list of articles on the technical aspects of steam oil to complement Harry's and Kevin's writings. they often will be writen with respect to large steam engines (boat, locomotive, etc.) but the info can be valuable. I also seem to remember there is one (or two) particular past thread (from the old MLS archives) entitled something like "What Steam Oil to Use", "Choosing a Steam Oil" or something similar, where Kevin O'Conner and other sages got into the fine details of all this tech stuff on steam oil.
 
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