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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am interested in using some Ivy around some trees and maybe even use it for Erosion Control around the perimeter of the RR--


 


The USDA shows that We reside in the Zone 7b, so...anyone have any ideas?


Thanks
Cale


 


testing photo posting


 
 

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Ivy grows fast, and can be hard to control. It's not outstanding for erosion control. I'd suggest something else. If you must use ivy, get the smaller leafed variety, like EnglishIvy, and trim it back severely every few years.

Regards, Greg
 
G

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Greg...I'd really like to to have around some Hardwood trees in the yard to break things up a bit...I will remember your suggestion!


 


Happy New Year


cale
 

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Hey Cale,

There are a lot of better ground covers to use besides ivy. I'll send you a list in a couple of days.

-Brian
 

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By my experience, Poison Ivy grows anywhere.
 

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I'm not a big ivy fan since it's so invasive./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/sad.gif 


For ground covers you could try some Carolina Jasmine which has some dwarf cultivars and is evergreen. 


If you want some color, you could plant some trumpet vine or wisteria around the trees, but expect to have to prune it continuously in the latter part of the summer and do not plant them next to a wooden fence!!   The runners will pop the boards off the stringers./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/shocked.gif


There are some like ornametal potatoe (light green,purple and yellow-white leaves) that generally are utilized in containers, but I'm not to sure of the hardiness/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/ermm.gif, and there are always grape and berry vines that can be utilized around the trees. (but most berry vines/bushes have thorns)  My grand dad fenced in his cattle lot back in the 50's planted blackberry and blueberry vines around it and in 3 years the fence was invisible and impenatrable!/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/laugh.gif  The lot was still there in '84 when the place got sold, but the only fence material that was left was the metal gate and the two pipe posts holding it. the pen was completely enclosed with the berry bushes.


Mark
 

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I would not recommend ivy. With having to remove it in the past, mo matter what you do it still lives. Very fast grower, climbs anything. Of course if you are on a slope and need  it for errosion its not really good for that.


You can try some evergreen ground cover like a blue star juniper, they have softer foilage and grow faster in the sun. You can even use the runners tied to a stick for trees on the railway.


 


There are many other perrinneal planys too here are just a few.


http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/b/bp/OXROS.html


http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/b/bp/PONES.html


http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/b/bp/LYNUS.html


http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/b/bp/SASUS.html


http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/b/bp/THELS.html


 


Maybe post some photos of the area to get an idea of what you are talking about.
 

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I agree with Jason. Ivy is terrible to control. It gets between things and separates them. It sticks to everything. I've been working for a year to get rid of some around the house (planted by the previous owner) and it's still growing back even though it's winter. Go see a local landscaper and get some advice on what works best in your zone for what you want to do. DON'T use ivy./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/sick.gif
 

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   Ivy is very invasive and once established, can be imposssible to control. Living in a warmer climate makes you a poor candidate for Trumpet Vine or Wisteria. Trumpet Vine reproduces using underground runners. Plant a trumpet vine in one spot and you will find it growing 20 feet away. Wisteria is a very powerful vine that has the ability, over time, to move a 4x4 post.. Instead, use grasses such as Blue Fescue, and Oat Grass. They are colorful, grow quickly, are easily divided to create more and are very drought tolerant. They also send down a decent root system for erosion control. Hope this has been of some help, regards, Dennis.                                                                                                                                                                                           
 
G

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok, sold me on the NO IVY!


I'll try to get a photo of area in question and post it up soon!


 


Thanks for all the replies thus far!


 


cale
 

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Actually Wisteria grows well in our climate, well zone 7 which I am in also in NJ. I have a family friend that is very elderly and she planted a wisteria on a trellis next to her garage. It had become too large for the trellis and she let is climb a tree 6 or so feet away. The plant is not about 60 years old and is about 12" in dia at the base. Maybe in the spring when it is blooming i will go there and photograph it, if totally has taken over 2 trees from above. I love to see it growing wild along the roads here.
 

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Another thing to consider under deciduous trees is how the leaves will be removed for fall cleanup. My favorite groundcover in that situation is pachysandra. You can rake it fairly easily or set your lawnmower at its highest and just mow over it and bag or mulch the leaves.
When I lived in north Jersey my father built a trellis and planted wisteria. In a few years when the trunk was 4-6" it broke the trellis. The beautiful, fragrant panicles were a delight otherwise. As Jason has pointed out, strong support is needed.
Have fun,
Tom
 

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This question is very dependent on your climate zone.

Here in the bottom of Zone 4 (very close to Zone 3), wisteria grows nicely but the short growing season keeps it forever at heights less than 6 feet. It dies back each winter and restarts in the spring attaining 6 feet again before the fall frosts shut it down.

Ivys like English ivy and Virginia Creeper are extremely invasive as well as being poor at erosion control. But with the short growing season here, a pruning in fall keeps English ivey well in check. Virginia Creeper can also be controlled the same way for a few years but eventually, its roots spread underground to make it eventually invasive and then almost impossibly to remove.

Normal ground covers are likely to work best in a shady situation (under a big tree) calling for erosion control. Evergreens normally do quite poorly in the shade - hemlocks are the only conifer that really enjoys full shade while yews and boxwoods do well in partial shade (in Zone 4) Tom's advice is excellent and I would lean toward that sort of groundcover as well, though it would depend on just how dense the shade really is. My first choice would be periwinkle but your climate may be too warm for it.

Your local nursery can likely give some good advice also but ... full shade + erosion control + ground cover in a non really invasive plant with small scale leaves and interesting foliage may be a tough requirement.

Regards ... Doug
 

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Cale, I live in zone 6A. Just for fun, I planted some small-leaved greenhouse/houseplant type ivy. Just wondered if it would survive the winter outside. It did. It also spread like mad. Several years later, I pulled 'all' of it up. Must have missed a few tendrils, because it has come back with a vengence. My advice: don't use ivy!! It roots everywhere it touches the ground, but it sure doesn't help with erosion...and it just takes over the garden. 


SandyR
 

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I will join the detractors of ivy even though I don't have my outdoor layout yet with this cautionary tail. When I started renting this place 4 years ago, the backyard and every fence around it and even most of the patio was covered in ivy. The stuff was crawling up the trees and strangling them and had made its way to the house. I told the landlord that I wasn't interested in renting it because of the ivy problem (the stuff had crawled over one of the fences and invading the front yard), to get me to sign the lease he threw in a gardner. Guess what my gardner spins 4 hours a week doing. Clearing ivy, and nothing else. This stuff invaded the neighbors yard years ago, climbed all over their house and trees. They think its beautiful and did little to manage it, letting nature take its course.
Those folks passed and their home was sold. The new owner spent 10s of thousands of dollars in repairs caused to the structure, plumbing and trees. Since he irradicated the stuff, my gardner still has to trim it back, but not as often and not so much. The stuff just can't be stopped once its planted and its hostile to anything standing in its way as long as that thing is slower than it.
 

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You can't beat periwinkle (vinca minor..creeping myrtle) for a ground cover and erosion control.  It stays green all year and has pretty flowers (usually blue but there is also pink and white) in the spring. It is easy to control as well and grows in most conditions and soils.
JMHO
Barb
 
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