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Enginear,
What sideframes are you going to use? That might make a difference in the wheel you choose. When I need to buy wheels to replace plastic I use Gary Raymond A34RL, now $5.95 per axle. They have a nice profile and track really well. If its for the Aristo barber (rollerbearing) truck, I would just stick with the Aristo 29111D at $22.80 for four. I'm not sure Gary Raymond makes a wheel without the axle flange that will fit the Aristo rollerbearing truck without modification to the sideframe or the axle. As a side note, years ago I purchased a whole bunch of used Raymond wheels in the A34 series at a train show for $1.00 per axle. I also had at the time some Aristo barber trucks with plastic wheels that needed conversion. In this case I pulled the wheels off the axles and had a machinist friend turn down the flanges on the axles. They then were a good fit for the Aristo sideframes.
 

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Wow, that's a find at a buck! Good advice on turning those. I had hoped that GR would have done that to a model for sale. I could just get the Aristo, I think they will be too large for under the flat car? I was hoping for something 33 or even 28". Aren't the Aristo's 36"??
 

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Dick the 29111D is an Aristo part number, any Aristo dealer or Aristo themselves.

Of course they are periodically out of them for a year at a time...

Greg
 

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Wholesale Trains lists 29111D's as available at $22.80 as does the Aristo store,same price. If they actually are available or in stock is another thing.
 

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I already have four sets of Aristo trucks with spinners that I thought I'd use first. Maybe I'll save them for another project.
 

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I may have to end up with NWSL wheels. They have taken care of me before with my O scale cars. They pretty much do them as ordered it seemed for large orders. Last time I ordered 100 axles to get the discount. I don't know if they do that for G scale. Even if they do, it seems all these car's trucks are different. Probably still not as bad as O scale over the years. I don't even see a listing for the Aristo w/ spinners. They do them for O scale Lionel and Atlas. May have to wait for Aristo........................or order the USAs,.... or turn down some sanvals or GRs????
 

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As to the Aristo Barber truck and using Aristo metal wheels, the more readily available Aristo ART-29111B wheels can be adapted to use in place of the ART-29111D wheels. The issue to deal with concerns the projecting hub on the suffix "B" wheels. (If you just try to install the "B" wheels in the Barber truck, they won't rotate freely.)

However, there is a method that Aristo Forum member, Ron Wenger, suggested a long time ago that I used and later documented in a vignette*.



That method is to countersink (bevel) the flange side of the brass bushing inserts that goes into the side frames. So doing provides just enough extra distance to accept the ART-29111B projecting wheel hub area so they will freely turn when installed. I've done countless wheel installations this way for the Aristo Barber trucks



* See article, Aristo-Craft Metal Wheel "train accessory" kits and wheel issues
When there, be sure to SCROLL DOWN TO "Adapting the Barber Truck to Accept ART-29111B metal wheels"

-Ted
 

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Thanks for posting that Ted. Looks like I may have to do that. I probably would use a different tool (tapered reamer) to get smoother results?
 

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You just want to add clearance for the hub on the wheelset... a tapered reamer would be too skinny and you would be working the inside of the hole, the bearing surface, which is not the problem.

Tapered reamer:
 

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My reamer I've had for years. It is not the one pictured Greg. If you can, picture one much more angled to provide the type bevel that is already on most surfaces.
 

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Yeah, more often called a countersink or deburring tool.... it might still be a bit too "deep" to accomplish the task, "eating up" more internal bearing surface by going deeper than you need, you might need a "shallower" tool, and I think that's why Ted used a drill bit.

Regards, Greg
 

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Yeah, the point was there's a tool for everything. You can get the countersinks as you call them with different degrees of angle. So, a drill bit may not be the best choice to produce a surface for what's required was my point. I shouldn't even mention it as Ted does a lot to help the average guy.
 

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A Rotary File would be the best bit, in my mind, available from jewelry supply houses.
Use with a small vac. to keep the filings out of the races.
To me a drill bit is too likely to grab and go deeper than wanted.

John
 

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I agree, I'd want a multi-flute tool instead of a drill bit with 2 flutes, but of course, again, the goal here is only to relieve the surface for clearance. The surface is a bit of a secondary consideration in this situation as far as I see.

In this case, it looks like the amount removed was small and the material was soft, making it easy.

I'm guessing a lot about Ted's thinking process here, but there's no denying the success of his methods.

Greg
 

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Whatever tool you decide to use, it must have a shallow angle as Greg said, otherwise you won't remove enough material at the outer circumference of the cut, and at the same time, risking cutting off too much material nearest the bushing hole - maybe breaking completely through it.

-Ted
 
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