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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So how tough would it be to make insulated wheels for the Ruby? I'm curious. ahs anyone even tried? I've considered it from time to time but hadn't got as far asking here if anyone has done it?

Chas
 

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Chas,
Remove the wheels sets, press the whels off the axles, machine of the treadand flange..to a flat tyre face.machine insulating sleeves, machine new treads/flanges to fit over the insulating sleeves,[press fit], reassembly, retime etc.. probably 9-11 hours work. labour $450 materials $35-40..

Gordon.
 

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Gordon,
I had not considered even insulating out at the tire. Thanks! What material should I make the sleeves from? The machining costs are negligable as I'll be doing it at work in the prototype shop as I get time. I've not machined anything since college though so I'm sure to spend more on materials and nothing on labor but my time.

Thanks!

Chas
 

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Take a look at Sierra Valley wheels or any metal wheel sets for that matter. The have a nylon bushing around the axel. Why not press off the wheel from the axel, enlarge the axel hole and press in a nylon or other insulating material bushing, then put the wheelset back together. Only problem with this is keeping a path for the electricity isolated. If the wheel or tire rubs the frame you lost the insulation. Another way without having to machine a new tire is to turn down the wheel center, wrap insulating material around it and press the tire back on.
Just my thoughts.
 

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make insulated wheels for the Ruby


There is a technique that I read about (haven't tried it personally) used by the UK guys, who have lots of steel and iron wheels to play with.

Using a fine coping saw, cut through half the spokes on one side of the wheel near the rim/tread. Fill the saw cuts with epoxy and allow to set thoroughly. Repeat process with the other half of the wheel. Check that the insulation works.

I think you could esaily get some spare Ruby wheels to experiment with from Accucraft. I also think that varying the angles of the cuts will add strength when the epoxy sets.

Any comments Gordon?
 

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Only problem with this is keeping a path for the electricity isolated

Noel,

The problem with a hub sleeve is the valve gear and cylinders, which connect the wheel electrically. Hence the Oz and UK techniques of insulating at the rim.
 

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What material should I make the sleeves from?


I remember reading an article about making brass drivers for HO locomotives, and how to go about insulating the rims. The article suggested machining the wheel and tire to a slip fit, heating the tire, and putting the wheel in the freezer. Before assmebling the mess, put the wheel inside a condom, and then trim the excess away after everything has reached room temperature.

I would suspect that a new, non-lubricated condom would be the best choice. ;)
 

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Chas,

Pete's suggestion is tried and true! It works! It's low tech! Just get a jewelers fret saw and blades with a .015 or larger kerf. Saw through every other spoke and epoxy the saw cuts. Saw the remaining spokes and epoxy them. Clean up the epoxy and paint. Simple solution. I read about this many years ago in the G1MRA N/L. Alternatively you will have to make tires and fit them to the wheels. Hub insulation isn't a good option.

Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Makes me wish I had more than the loupe from my Grandfather when he was a jewler. Sounds liek the easiest way at thsi point is to do the surgery to the spokes then? I may try to contact Accucraft to see about a replacement set in case I screw them up or to try the butchering on the "rims and tires" but that can wait. The spoke surgery is relatively simple project requiring the least amount of skills and supplies really.

Thanks Guys!

Chas
 

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Hi everybody!
Caught this thread today and have a question. I understand the principle of cutting through every other one of the spokes and replacing the metal with epoxy, then doing the remaining spokes. BUT the Ruby drivers that I have only have spokes on one side. Would you still try to do this with these drivers? And if so, how would you proceed? The large "counterweight" area will be a pretty long cut to keep straight. (or curved in this case!) As a person who uses such a saw every day, I am not sure I would do this cut. Here is a picture of one of my unused Ruby drivers. Keep in mind that unless you remove the drivers from the axles, one set will have eccentrics to get in the way of the saw as well.



Maybe I am missing something here?
redbeard AKA Larry Newman SA #1956
 

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Posted By redbeard on 12/11/2008 7:23 AM
Hi everybody!
Caught this thread today and have a question. I understand the principle of cutting through every other one of the spokes and replacing the metal with epoxy, then doing the remaining spokes. BUT the Ruby drivers that I have only have spokes on one side. Would you still try to do this with these drivers? And if so, how would you proceed? The large "counterweight" area will be a pretty long cut to keep straight. (or curved in this case!) As a person who uses such a saw every day, I am not sure I would do this cut. Here is a picture of one of my unused Ruby drivers. Keep in mind that unless you remove the drivers from the axles, one set will have eccentrics to get in the way of the saw as well.



Maybe I am missing something here?
redbeard AKA Larry Newman SA #1956





Oops. Maybe I should have looked at my FWRR/Ruby first... Sorry - it's upstairs under the Xmas tree adding red and green train to the festivity.

My guess is that the only way to deal with this wheel is to put it in a lathe and cut through the outer part of the wheel/inner part of tread, to separate the tread from the wheel. Then epoxy it back. As I don't have a lathe, this is purely hypothetical and probably impossible.
 
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