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Discussion Starter #1
I searched MLS forums and found some references (from 2005) to Inglenook Sidings in the archives, but could not find any reference to an operating G-gauge model layout for Inglenook Sidings. Has anyone done this?

I have played the computer version at Inglenook Sidings. I think it is mislabeled "Riverside Yards" (which is a different shunting scenario).

I have seen various websites that show an HO gauge layout of Inglenook Sidings can be made in a 4 foot X 1 foot space. This requires the use of "short" cars to keep the size of the minimalist layout small. Details can be found at Model Railways Shunting Puzzles.

I'm in the brainstorming stage of "What would it take to build a G-gauge layout of Inglenook Sidings?". My plan is to build an indoors track powered layout. Small size is a consideration, but not so important as to compromise the car lengths to bobber caboose length. The 8 cars would be typical 4-axle LGB boxcar length.

I plan to use Kadee couplers (and magnets) for automatic coupling/uncoupling.

A robust locomotive design is important to avoid stripped gears from the number of direction reversals required. This is far different from running circles around a continuous loop. I've got 2 Bachmann 4-6-0's but I don't think they would last very long. I've got 2 LGB Moguls, but if the gears wear out, replacement gears may be an issue since LGB went out of business.

Any experiences, suggestions, guidelines from anyone that has done this layout in G-gauge would be appreciated.
 

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Considering that a Bachmann Annie is almost 2 feet long that would eat up half your layout before you even got another car on.

Planned one of these out, but I was planning on using an HLW Mack and shorty cars, even they eat up alot of space, 1 x 4 is very very small once you lay some track down. If I remember right I found for a Riverside Inglenook I ended up needing a 2'x4' area with a removable cassette extention for the train to clear switches.
 

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Scratch that 2x4, it was 2'x6'!!!

I also did the Timesaver, it took up 2'x8'


And this Inglenook plan was still using R1 switches and an HLW Mack and HLW mini cars:


Remember, this is LARGE scale
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The 4 foot X 1 foot I referenced was for HO gauge. I'm thinking more in the range of 16 feet long by "whatever" wide.

The headshunt may have to be a detachable extension to accomodate the locomotive plus 3 cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
vsmith,

You have certainly put some serious planning into your G-gauge shunting layouts. Thanks for the info.

Your Inglenook Sidings looks like one of the "reduced" versions listed in Model Railways Shunting Puzzles. Maybe it's the Carl Arendt Micro?
I'd really like to model the classic 3-3-5 Inglenook Sidings with 8 cars of equal length (if space permits).

5 cars plus the switch and uncoupler will require approx. 7 feet. Maybe the "siding unit" could be 7' X 3'. The headshunt has to accomodate 3 cars plus the locomotive. Maybe a 6 foot removable extension would handle that. Perhaps I could do the whole layout in 13' X 3' with a "modular" connection at 7' (switch #1).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Bob,

Thanks for the link to Ric Golding's Timesaver modular layout. Although this is different than the Inglenook Sidings layout I am considering, the method of construction and modularization is most helpful.

Thanks again!
 

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Don,

Go over to LSC & ask Ric Golding to post a picture of his Inglenook Siding.. He did it in large scale..

BulletBob
 

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When my track was still on the ground, I had a simple oval connected to a three track stub yard. I was able to do the Inglenook Sidings shunting (switching).

For indoors, I still have my OO/HO Inglenook sidings. I believe it's about 33 inches long by 9 1/2 inches wide. I designed it to fit just inside the rear door of my 1981 Subaru GL wagon. Of course, the British 0-6-0t shunters and two axle goods wagons I use with that layout don't take up too much real estate either.

Victor's idea for using the Hartland Mack switcher and Hartland's shorty cars is about comparable to my short OO British stock, but in large scale. It would still take a lot more real estate than my OO/HO Inglenook Sidings. HOWEVER, a Gn15 version could probably squeeze into the same space my OO/HO version uses.

Worth a thought.

Have fun,
David Meashey
 

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A switching yard three tracks wide will fit on tables 2 feet wide. I used 4 foot radius switches on mine and ran 4-axle diesels with 40 foot cars. Although it was 30 feet long, it was still possible to spend a good deal of time moving a couple of cars to the opposite side of the yard. It was a good way to test new motive power and great way to spend a couple of hours in the winter running trains.

Carl Arendt’s web site Micro/Small Layouts For Model Railroads is a good site for ideas.
http://www.carendt.com/

If I ever build another, I would love to include a Panama Canal turntable.

 

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Discussion Starter #12
Paul,

Thanks for the width info. I was planning for less than 30 feet long. Using "standard" 4-axle boxcars that measure 17.5" long would require 7' 3.5" for the 5 car siding (assuming it's straight), plus another couple of feet for the switch and uncoupler. (= 9 ft 3.5 in.)

9 feet 3.5 in. for the siding plus 7 feet for the headshunt adds up to 16 feet 3.5 in.

Add another foot for end of rail barriers, etc. for a total of approx. 17 feet. That would be my first estimate.

I've got the cars and the locomotive. I'll buy the track and switches and uncoupler magnets and lay it out on the floor and measure it before committing to any table or module design.

The Panama turntable is neat. I've never seen that before. Only in Panama I guess.
 

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When I was building my indoor layout many years back, I scribbled away for weeks designing layouts on paper until I became frustrated. Then one day in the basement I found a box of chalk. I drew an outline on the painted floor of my proposed tables and began playing with track and switches. By the end of the day I had a track plan that exceeded my expectations, and beacuse it fit withing the lines I knew it would fit the tables.
 

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Yes my switch yard on my outdoor layout is an Inglenook . I enjoy the yards and switching , and the operations with it .
But , I used LGB C&S boxcars to lay it out for size , and then to use AC boxcars and flats and etc , it became a bit short , and care must be used , for like the AC flat , which is a bit longer than a 40 foot boxcar , as to which track to have it in .
Watch the curve radius [ unless you run straight out from the switches ] or you will have a coupleing - uncoupling problem on the alignment of the cars and couplers .

It is fun , and time really flys by , doing switching operations on a Inglenook , either inside or outside .

Carefully plan for which rolling stock you may use , and curve radius , most of all !



 

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I came across a picture of a modeler in Britain I think, who did a TimeSaver in G. He'd take it around to shows. For the life of me I can't find the link to the pic or article about it. If I remember right the gentleman had a beard and wore glasses. If someone knows where this TimeSaver is, could you post its URL.
Thanks,
Dave
 

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All the info offered above is very valuable and will certainly help in your personal design of Inglenook or Timesaver Switching Puzzles. If your design criteria is SPACE then you will have to adjust what cars will fit in what space. If your criteria is the engines and rolling stock, then your space will be considerably different. Using Kadee couplers and magnets will also present a new factor to include since it must be on straight track to uncouple correctly. I don't think that exact quantity of the rolling stock is as important as the function. If your yard lead is equal to your longest yard track, plus the motive power and your other two tracks are less than that longest track by one or two cars you can achieve the proper frustration of enjoying this puzzle.

The Timesaver is the same way. If you are going to be switching 85 foot auto racks with a pair of GP40's, the dimensions will be considerably different than the guy with the HLW Mack and 2 axle mining carts, both can achieve the same switching interest.

As far as what motive power to use, I feel almost any style or type of engine will do. It depends on how well you treat it as to how long it will last. Jon Radder has helped me set up a Bachmann Heisler to do the switching on the KVRwy's Timesaver. It has a Phoenix sound system and the operator must learn the patience to let the sound system go through its entire whistle cycle before making the next move. This is difficult. Believe me, really difficult. But, lots of fun. Old steam engines did not change direction that easy.

I've been abusing the Timesaver and Inglenook puzzles since about 2001 at Large Scale Train Shows all over the eastern half of the USA. I've used Bachmann, LGB, USA, Aristo and HLW engines with no apparent damage to any of them. I could probably tear any of them up in a weekend if I tried real hard, but don't think that would serve much purpose.

We will have the Inglenook and Timesaver setup at the ECLSTS at the end of March in the alcove of the layout hall. Anyone is welcome to stop by and give it a try. I have a beard and wear glasses, ancestory is British, but nobody has ever accused me of embarrassing the English throne.
 
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