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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is really a silly question that probably was answered or is common knowledge--like "Don't touch a red hot object."

Anyway, how do you keep liquid (solvent cement, in this case) from spilling over the edge of a container (one of those oblong-shaped tin cans) as you try to pour it out of the can and into some othercontainer? I watched as a substantial amount of my solvent cement pour onto the garage floor as I tipped the can.
 

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A funnel with a mouth larger than the height of the can. Then what ever flows back down the body of the can to drip from the bottom still lands in the funnel and goes down the spout.

You could also use a syringe to transfer the liquid, but if you are transfering glue, when it dries that is the last use of that syringe.

I don't know the particular configuration of the can you are pouring from, but you might also be able to form a spout from some aluminium foil and get it stuck or attached somehow to the can so that it forms a lip for the liquid to drip from before it flows back along the side of the can.
 

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Pouring a liquid from one vessel to another. In this operation care must be taken to prevent the liquid from running down the side of the vessel from which it is poured. A glass rod should be held lightly against the rim of the vessel. The liquid will flow down the rod.
 

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I don't know what type of can the cement comes in. The alcohol and acetone I buy at Home Depot are upright cans with an opening on top at one edge similar to cans of vegetable oils at grocery stores.

Most people pour with the opening at the bottom and it spills all over. The trick is to have the opening as high up as possible, and with the receptacle you're pouring into right next to the lower lip of the opening. Seems counter-intuitive but it works.

Art
 

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Steve C's post just above my first post works very well with the method I described if you're unable to get the container you're pouring into in close contact with the lower lip of the can opening you're pouring out of.

Art
 

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Chemist's Trick....

The "Beak" on a beaker is actually for holding the glass rod the chemist lays across the top of the beaker when he wants to pour. Works with a nail or whaever you have. Just lay a paintbrush or whever is appropriate to what you're pouring across the can and hold it with your index finger as you pour and the stuff will neatly follow it into your vessle and not down the side of the can.

Oh. Like Steve says :D
 

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Joe,
Art is right. The hole of the oblong can should be at the TOP when you pour and not at the bottom. Also, use a funnel if you have to.

Russ
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Righto!

Now did I tell you I almost super-glued my lips shut by trying to blow into the little applicator tip to see if it was clear? It was like that scene in "Big" where Tom Hanks samples some caviar, then keeps spitting it out 'cause he hates the taste. "Ch-reck, ptui, blech!"

Then when I poured some of my wife's nail polish remover into the nozzle to clear it out, the gunk inside trickled out and dripped into the bathroom sink where it quickly began to resolidiy. I hastily dipped a cotton ball in more nail polish remover and quickly scrubbed off the CA before my wife saw it.

Maybe I shoulda taken up stamp collecting.

Oh yeah: my old time gas station is near completion (I have to finish the roof) and looks pretty cool, but I won't post a photo until it's done.
 

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Reading Joe's post reminds me of the time I super-glued a chest-of-drawers to MY chest. It was a piece of antique furniture I was repairing for my wife's business. I had glued down some veneer on the drawer dividers on the front of the chest. I then had to move it to another part of the garage. I was wearing a thin cotton T-shirt and "bear-hugged" the chest to pick it up and move it. Only problem was it wouldn't let go when I put it down.

Apparently, I had use a bit too much and it had oozed onto the outside of the veneer. When I grabbed it, it soaked through the T-shirt and adhered to my chest. No one else was home and not acetone nearby. Just had to grit my teeth and pull away. Ouch !


Bill
 
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