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Discussion Starter #1
Being new to the Large Scale area, I was looking for a theme. Not really having the terrain or the money to buy large amounts of track, I was searching for an idea. I got a book called 'Railroads in the Woods', a fantasic book! That hooked me! I bought a Bachmann 'Climax', I am thrilled with the engine. I'm looking to build a steam donkey and just started my first scratch built 'skeleton', modeled after my engine's company: Michigan-California Lumber. Reading the book is an education in itself, great pics of early logging, the unimaginable collection of equipment, and every conceivable concoction of ways of getting the job done. Hard to imagine how hard life was then! I think I love 'junk', and I think this is one theme where junk is what made the day!
 

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In Townsend TN the Little River Museum is a great place to look at a Shay and see an actual logging flat car. The museum has pictures and a book about logging the area.
Also Cradle of Forestry in NC, near Mt Pisgah on the BR Parkway has skels, an American (I think) loader and a Climax.
Both are worth the trip if you are interested in logging in the Appalachians.
The Conasauga Lumber company may still have a Shay and some information on the operation of the logging in Polk County. There is also a little information on a three foot Apalachia Tannic Acid Company and what was originally a pole line later changed to std gauge, Apalachia Land and Lumber. The town near the Hiwassee River is now gone and I have only found a few references to the logging operation.

Bob
 

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I really like the idea of a logging RR. The Shays, are the most appealing locomotive ever to me. I like the idea of the tight curves and steep inclines. It could be done in a smaller area than a modern mainline. You are on a great path in my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I saw the site on the 'net last night for the Townsend site. Yea, these places will be a great little trip for the wife and I. I really like the Shay too, maybe one day I'll be able to get one of those too! Ageed, the tight curves, inclines, piled up log trestles, just seem to make an interesting operation. Can always tie that into a mainline freight or passenger line.......when I win the lottery!
 

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If I told you how much pleasure we get from hooking up a couple of two-truck Shays , a three-truck Shay, a Climax and a Heisler on the front of long log train of skellies I built myself, topped off with a shorty logging caboose, likewise self-built, you'd prolly laff. Might just give it a push with my three-cylinder AccuCraft live-steamer for the fun of it.

To see the look of folks faces over here in UK, seeing three kinds of locomotives they never knew existed, is worth a small fortune every time we do it.

Don't forget the sound, too!!!

Plus, they move real slow, like I do.


tac
www.ovgrs.org
 

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One here,


The Goe and Labbe book is a great general reference. Another good one is "Logging Railroads of the West" by
Kramer Adams. This one concentrates on western logging, obviously, but is a great reference for the novice because
it explains in text and pictures the different logging methods and operations. It also has a glossary of logging terms
as well as index of the known logging railroads in the west, giving their name,location,track miles,locomotives,and dates of operation.

The best thing about this particular book, even though it is long out of print it can still be found on e-bay and other places for
15-25 bucks.

If your a fan of the Mich-Cal you can't be without a copy of "PINO GRANDE, Logging Railroads of the Michigan-California Lumber Co."
by R. S. Polkinghorn. The original edition 1966, will probably set you back 75-125 if you can find one in good shape. Luckily Steve just recently released a another batch of the 1984 printing of the second edition which contains a few more pictures and a little more information, although the quality is much lower. But if your like me and want the book for the information not it's museum potential the second edition is great.

For donkeys and such in 1:20 scale your pretty much on your own. Ozark makes a kit for a couple of Dolbeer's but they are 1:24 and really look small in 1:20 because they are of such a small prototype anyway.

The archives here are a real PITA to use but I was able to come up with a link to some pictures of the completed AH&D hoisting engine I built a couple years ago, somewhere in the archives is the building log but I couldn't find it, maybe you can. anyway here is the one link.

http://archive.mylargescale.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=32880&SearchTerms=Donkey,engines


Good luck on your logging line.
Rick Marty
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Man, I wish I could afford several engines, one thing I saw in the book was one engine in front and one at the end of a string of loaded log cars to handle the grades. Some of the inclines seem impossible for locos to handle. And, I agree, Tac, sloooooooow is good! As for the donkey, I'm hoping to build a live steam donkey. There again, the RR in the Woods book has some great pictures. As for sound, that's done the road! Maybe if I just make sounds, my family wil get sick of listening to me and buy the stuff!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the reference to your donkey, the close-ups of the winch was what I needed. I'm sure you guys have seen Wegmuller's steam rig. I think I've figured out to make a simple clutch, using a sliding drum with an 'O' ring. Don't have a clue what it could lift-maybe a balsa log! My idea was to start with a 'high spar' rig with pulleys and carriage as the start for my operation, with some small live spruce trees to form the woods.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No, Garrett, but thanks for doing my research for me! I was just on Amazon but didn't see that. Have to hit the right buzz words.
 

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Way back in my younger years, I had the good fortune to work for a large timber company as a logging engineer. This was in the northwest coast of California among the redwoods. We were in the process of transitioning from old gorwth timber to second growth (most of which was still rather large) and my job incorporarted going out and engineering areas to be logged. This was one of the best jobs I had.

Daily we would find artifacts from a 100 years ago. My favorites were the reconstruction projects on railroad grades. Invariably, we would follow a grade to a relaod area or a camp and the findings were surreal. A coworker always found the outhouses, because that is where he could find old whiskey bottles. The loggers hid their whiskey there. The cook would bury the china rather than move it when camp was abandoned. We came accross tons of abandoned china, boots, beds, lunch boxes, spikes and bottles. We had a game of looking for spar trees, because we could always find the chaser's coffee mug. My wife never understood or appreciated the stuff I would bring home. I still have one mug, which I cherish because of all the mugs we found, this one has no cracks or checks in it.

Railroad logging was pervalent around the turn of the last century. We constantly found parts of cars and tools, especially at the reloads. We found a few engines and yarders too. One in particular was a gypsy that had been pulling cable away from a spar tree, when the weight of the cable exceeded the weight of the loco. Unfortunately the engine was on a curved trestle when gravity took over. It was pulled off the tracks and down a draw. Everything was intact, but instead of yarding the engine back up the hill, which was less than 100 feet, they left it where it lay. I spent days scampering over it.

Of course the economy being what it was, caused me to change careers, but I sure miss those days of old.

Fil
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Great photos! Clearly someone who knows how to take pics for builders! Is this a place for tourists to visit? It would be the trip.
 

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Posted By Cap'nBill on 01/30/2009 1:55 PM

Great photos! Clearly someone who knows how to take pics for builders! Is this a place for tourists to visit? It would be the trip.



Well thanks,
just looked at it and said "If I were to build this, what would I want to see?"....

Yes, you can visit, it's in Brevard NC at the Cradle of Forestry...

http://www.cradleofforestry.com/


We camp in the area and finally went out a year or so ago and climbed all over the Loco!

cale
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Fact is, I have a skeleton in the build stages right now! Those pics-especially the trucks are a big help....I was lost there! May I, or perhaps 'We' encourage you take a lot of trips, along with your camera! Bill
 

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Posted By Cap'nBill on 01/29/2009 7:56 PM
No, Garrett, but thanks for doing my research for me! I was just on Amazon but didn't see that. Have to hit the right buzz words.


I cannot remember if the Cookeville Depot or if Central Tennessee Hobbies had this book for sale locally? Might want to drive down the hill and check.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I was in there around Christmas time and, at the time, was looking at videos. I guess your suggesting I need to go back down the mountain and mingle with them Flatlanders!
 

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Posted By Cap'nBill on 01/30/2009 2:24 PM
Fact is, I have a skeleton in the build stages right now! Those pics-especially the trucks are a big help....I was lost there! May I, or perhaps 'We' encourage you take a lot of trips, along with your camera! Bill


Cap'nBill - I can build two skellies in an evening using the basic plans from GR....add a pair of trucks of your choice [I got a job-lot of old-style Bachmann trucks for $20 a bag of twenty], a few details from Ozark - nuts and bolts and so on, add some logs, not forgetting to chamfer the ends like the real thing, and you're good to go!

Besp

tac
www.ovgrs.org
 
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