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Senior Dish Washer
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All

I've got an Aristo F1A and F1B and plan to pull a set of Aristo Streamline Passenger Cars up a 3 maybe 4% grade. These are early models that have not had the new motors installed. How many passenger cars can I expect the two powered units will pull? I'd really like to be able to pull 7 cars. That would be close to a 20 foot long train. With an 89' x 34' L shaped layout, I think the 20' length would look grand. All mainline curves will be 8' diameter.

Randy
 

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Premium Member
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3,883 Posts
Which passenger cars? if all 2 axle short versions, I would expect no problem.

all 3 axle consist with tht grade could be a chnllenge, but a little extra weight in each engine would fix that.
You could add 8 ounces to the middle of each engine. See George Schreyers site for info on this for the old FA's.
 

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The streamline cars are heavy, but those old F units are work horses. I would worry about trying to get 7 of them up your 4% grade, just 'cause they're heavy and the grade is steep.
 

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I'd push the curves wider if you could--maybe 10' diameter at a minimum, 12' would be better. Regardless of how the locos pull the cars, running 7 of those long cars through a 4' radius curve will put a lot of drag on the consist, making it feel like quite a few more cars. Add the 4% grade on top of the tight curves, and you're really asking for undue wear.

Later,

K
 

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My experience is that you will have fairly severe slippage problems on the 4ft radius [ 8ft diameter ] curve which is also on a significant grade. I used to hae a similiar geometric feature. If you put a bunch of weight in the gas tanks of the two locos, it will help significantly.

JimC.
 

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I have an aristo pacific which can manage 4 heavyweight cars at reasonable speed on a brutal 5% grade--with a curve--that I can't get around on my layout. I switched from 3 axle trucks to two axle trucks, and it made a dramatic difference in the amount of drag. I know the two axle trucks are not protoypical, but to be honest I never even notice anymore
 

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Senior Dish Washer
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the replies.
As for going to bigger radius curves, some of us have to work in confined areas. I've only got 14 feet between a cement wall and the pool enclosure.
 

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The older style FA-1 FB-1 is a strong locomotive pair. I have a set of the older ones, and they pulled pretty well, until I started making them haul heavy long trains. The problem is the axles extend into the sideframes where they ride in a plain brass bushing. That is how power is picked up. Eventually, the steel axle wears the brass bushing out. If you are running battery power, it might not be as much of an issue.

I would suggest upgrading the power trucks to the newer style aristo ball bearing trucks, so you could add more weight to the locomotives. This is coming from a guy who has worn out his FA1 FB1 motor blocks and needs to do as suggested! A single aristo RS-3 with those new trucks and some weight easily handled a 7 car passenger train (5 USA streamliners and two Aristo heavyweights) on my steep railroad. I would expect the same or better performance out of upgraded FAs.
 
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