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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the best way to make a snow covered roof on a box car? In the past I have used Chalk powder after I have applied a heavy amount of dull coat. But I takes a lot of spray and chalk and more spray so it won't come off. I looks great on small areas like steps and dosen't get that yellow look. So much chalk is lost is absorbing the spray. But for a large area like a roof top of a car I need something thats not so time consuming. Any ideas?
 

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Polex,

For the snow effect, I usually wait until it is about 25 degrees F, and the snow is falling. Put the trains outside to cool down (the metal wheels will actually melt the snow, and then it freezes, which insulates the rail and makes it hard for the electricty to get to the motor).

these are from last winter, my first time using the Aristo Mikado to plow snow. The plow itself is an off the shelf Aristocraft item. It has ball bearing wheels which allows the user to put a real load in the gon. This is required to keep the snow from building up underneath.


I use a full size brick. Seems to work well. Others might use ballast, but you need something:


I am guessing you mean for like Christmas displays, right? I can't help you much with that. However, I don't think chalks alone will be convincing enough. Snow takes up space, and you might try and account for that, as well.


Maybe some of that fake, spray on snow will work.
 

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Polex
I'ld hoped that someone more knowledgeable would answer but...
I remember reading about using marble dust for snow, sounds more promising than chalk.
I think it's used as an additive for tile grout, but the memory is a bit fuzzy.

Harvey C.
 

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I seem to remember some time ago that someone used flour laid down with a flour sifter to create temporary snow. Possibly dry plaster of paris could be used as well. I haven't tried these methods myself so I can't comment on how practical they are.
 

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Maybe "microballoons" and CA glue? Or baking soda and CA?
 

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What about that Expanding foam used to plug holes around pipes in the walls. Experiment with that and paint it white?
 

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maybe the snow in the can? the spray on stuff that they decorate windows with
 

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The snow in a spray can would be a good idea, however if you want more fluffy snow, last year in a garden center /Christmas shop, we found snow to be used with Christmas villiages that you add water to then put it out, it actually looks like snow.
They also have bags of dry "snow" that you could spray some adhesive on the roof, then sprinkle it on.
 

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Took me forever to find this old post where a similar question was asked:

Snow

But then again there's nothing like the real stuff:


 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well I did forget to mention that it is for an indoor layout. If I get a chance I will try to post some pictures of what I have got done. And I was going for something that wouldn't come off to the touch.
 

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Posted By Allan W. Miller on 09/12/2008 1:59 PM
For indoor displays (temporary): Baking soda




Baking Soda is great inside, but will yellow if damp/wet. I use it in my Christmas Display (inside only) each year.
http://www.heather-ridge.com/wonderland07

Not sure what you are trying to do. Just want a snow look on top of your cars? There is a crystal type product at
some craft stores...it may come in white as well as a near clear that resembles ice. I suppose you could use spray on
glue then sprinkle it on.
 
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