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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Well of course I forgot the switch throws for the switchcrafters swithes I bought for the new layout.  Having already spent way to much money on this project (the intial track purchase, a loco and some rolling stock, battery and RC control, etc.) I'm looking for a budget way to throw my switches.

Anyone here come up with a cheap switch throw? 

Thanks,

J
 

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If you're going to have your track on the ground, you might want to look at the ten mille ground throws, as they don't stand up above the track.  I got mine from Dave Goodson.

Alternatively, you can build your own for not much money at all.  The key here is to make sure you use sturdy components!   While there's lots of different designs out there, I designed mine so I wouldn't have to bend any of the brass frame.   You will have to solder, so it might be handy to have a small torch or a big soldering gun.   There's really not much too these:


And they build into a nice sturdy stand.  I know I've tripped over mine several times, and I've just had to bend back the mast.


There's a few more details on my web site.  There's an article on how to build them in June 2007 Garden Railways.
 

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Bruce, great looking throws! Question, how does the throw connect to the switch?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys, the latch throws appear to be the ticket, cheap, simple, and sturdy. I'll need to find a drill press to drill out the bolt. Anyone from the Fort Collins G scalers post here and have a drill press?

Thanks again,

J
 

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Posted By SE18 on 02/29/2008 9:35 AM
; surprised CA works well outside, Pete.



It doesn't in my experience, so, when it comes to switches, I only ever use it to keep the adjuster nuts from moving during assembly. Once outside, CA will hold everything in place until rust can take over and keep things from moving. Works like a charm.

I would never glue the point rails to the throw bar, if that's what you mean.
 

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Posted By NBS2005 on 02/29/2008 9:40 AM
Thanks guys, the latch throws appear to be the ticket, cheap, simple, and sturdy. I'll need to find a drill press to drill out the bolt. Anyone from the Fort Collins G scalers post here and have a drill press?

Thanks again,

J


You're welcome, J. Note however that if you don't want to use my nifty patented slider adjustment system there are other ways to attach the throwbar to the barrel bolt. Therefore you don't need to drill out the barrel, requiring a drill press. Perhaps SE18 has some suggestions, as he appears to have used a method unlike mine.
 

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I have always used the simple v shaped spring to throw my points side to side. Keep It Simple is my motto. They are below the railhead and so don't get broke when you shovel snow off of the track. Can't get cheaper and simpler than a piece of safety pin.

Terl
 

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We originally used the same system as Pete and drilled the barrel bolts right through. We got lazy after a while and now just drill one side deep enough to use a self-tapping screw. The piano wire spring can be bent in a couple of seconds with a pair of pliers. Here is a picture of the IPP&W’s standard switch throw.
 

 
A little silicon spray in the spring keeps them operating smoothly during the operating season.
 
This variation mounts in a little less space next to the rail.
 

 
This one passes under an adjacent track. A couple of small nails keep it from flexing. A plastic tube painted and hot glued to the road bed could replace the nails.
 

 
A choke cable mounted on the side of the bench work to throw an inaccessible switch. Note the fancy end of track device. It doesn't have to pretty, it just has to work.
 

 
A three way stub switch made with aluminum rail and acrylic sheet.
 

 
The throw is a simple brass handle pinned in an acrylic cube. Nails between the ties on the outside of the moving rails limit the travel of the switch to either side.
 

 
 
 

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mine is a bit easier. I drill right thru the side and add a link (loop) of copper wire (soldered). The link allows enough play for the latch turn so that the rod can then be moved. Rotational and push-pull action is accomplished. Plenty of ways to skin the cat. I may try Pete's method and other approaches as i get bored doing the same thing
 
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not exactly related, but i would like to know, how long the moving part of the rails must be on a switch of the type shown on the foto.

korm
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