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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here’s a refugee from Hurricane Ian that we brought back to Maryland for the first time.

20221112_152609-Henry2sm
20221112_152609-Henry2sm1159×684 303 KB


Hasn’t been run for a couple of years, but still in great shape.


"Henry" at the SC&M

You might query the single-track line, but there are many examples today of big streamliners running on single track branches, like N&W J611 on the Strasburg RR. This was just a ‘positioning’ run for Henry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
and I haven’t seen one very often
You probably saw this one, as it went on the rounds to drum up business when it was announced. They never made any more (though I believe there is one in the factory/museum in China.) I bought the prototype when they abandoned the project, due to all the 1/32nd purists sniffing at the concept of a 1/29th loco.

Which is a great shame, as all the AML (American Mainline) locos will handle 4' radius, 8' diameter curves. Jerry's SC&M has 5+' radius minimum and the Hudson, K4, USRA 060 and all the others have no problems. Plus there is a lot of rolling stock around in that scale, including USAT's aluminum streamliners (I had 6 before Hurricane Ian came visiting. Now I have 5.)

I am also surprised that no manufacturer has produced one in 1/32nd scale.
 

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At the time of introduction,for good or—perhaps in this case and a few others— bad, the “not scale” stink stifled any hope of market success. I love the art deco streamlined engine and car era but I guess I was in a minority to influence production.

Good for you that you grabbed this representative of the era. I know Hans (Aster) did not push the streamliners in the market so perhaps Bowande or another “market worthy” Accucraft attempt can happen. That is likely wishful thinking on my part but perhaps there are others out there who would voice a desire to produce one…

Sam
 

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I think we all tried to persuade Aster US to produce a classic streamliner but the strong preference was for the big and brutal rather than the fast and elegant. I saw the Accucraft Dreyfuss at a steam up in Woodside many years ago and glad it survived. The scale issue for me was more about how it looked with other locomotives in my collection rather than an intrinsic dislike of 1:29.

Accucraft produced the T1 and the NW611 - I'd love to see more and the Dreyfuss New York Hudson would be top of my list.

Robert
 

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Yes very nice Pete, this is a very iconic streamlined design even recognised by non-railroad people as symbolic of the 'modern' design school of the period and of course a very rare live steam model.
Thanks for sharing Russell
Rare, as in 'one', in fact.

It was a bit of a white elephant to be honest. A one-off locomotive that would never have been seen anywhere else, in a scale that did not match Gauge 1 in any meaningful way. A beautiful model, but a lost cause, except to the owner, of course!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
A beautiful model, but a lost cause, except to the owner, of course!
Tac, most US express trains had engines unique to the RR line. I also have a K4 pacific, which was unique to the PRR (and a set of 1/29th heavyweights to go with it.)

The other aspect of AML was that the engines worked on curves typical of a small garden railway. That's a huge advantage to the poor guy trying to get in to live steam.

The 1/29th scale vendors produced Big Boy articulated and all sorts of other large steamers, like the USAT 8444 and the Aristo Mikado. Why not have the same in live steam?

If you have no 1/32nd stuff, the 1/29th locos are fine. I think it was a sensible marketing position for Accucraft, and it is a shame Fred passed away so it stopped.
 
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