G Scale Model Train Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
314 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know of a good book or web site that gives details on the proportions of or design of Hackworth valvegear??? Other radial valvegear??? I kow about dos based simulator but that is not what I want.

Thanks,

Jack
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
314 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Henner,

Thanks for the info!

Wasn't aware of the win simulator and will try it though the Martin Evins book is probably more what I want. Guess it is my age but for some things I prefer to have a book in hand even if while working in cad/solid modeling.

Jack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Jack, (and anyone else)
You should be aware of the Charles Dockstader valve gear programs which are freeware and easily found on the web. One thing to know about them however is that these aren't primary "design" programs, they are a proofing programs. You design your valve gear (or find a previous design) and plug its parameters into Dockstader and the program will show you how the gear is work and from that allows you to make fine adjustements to maximize your gear. It is not as easy as it sounds, at least for me. A Walshearts gear, for instance, done from scratch has around 57 variables (IIRC) to be determined before the gear can be proofed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
966 Posts
Posted By Old Boy on 03/01/2009 8:53 AM
Jack, (and anyone else)
You should be aware of the Charles Dockstader valve gear programs which are freeware and easily found on the web. One thing to know about them however is that these aren't primary "design" programs, they are a proofing programs. You design your valve gear (or find a previous design) and plug its parameters into Dockstader and the program will show you how the gear is work and from that allows you to make fine adjustements to maximize your gear. It is not as easy as it sounds, at least for me. A Walshearts gear, for instance, done from scratch has around 57 variables (IIRC) to be determined before the gear can be proofed.

See my link above...
Regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Henner,
I beg yer pardon, I read to "Martin Evans . . " and stopped reading. I'm guilty of one of my own BBS pet peeves, having someone come along three posts later and repeat what I've previously said.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,071 Posts
Jack: Here is another radial valve gear, the Joy valve. This diagram is also from Henry Greenly:


http://1stclass.mylargescale.com/xo18thfa/Joy.jpg

By the way, this diagram came from "The Model Locomotive, Its Design and Construction" by Henry Greenly, 1904. I think this book is available from Google Books as a free download. The Hackworth diagram came from "Model Engineering, A Guide to Model Workshop Practice" which is a reprint from Lindsey Publications


Mr Greenly is really "old school". Fun to read.


Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
966 Posts
Posted By Old Boy on 03/01/2009 11:14 AM
Henner,
I beg yer pardon, I read to "Martin Evans . . " and stopped reading. I'm guilty of one of my own BBS pet peeves, having someone come along three posts later and repeat what I've previously said.


Never mind,
happens to me all the time. I like your combination of workshop and pub! BTW, the Marshall valve gear is also pretty simple/interesting. No eccentrics/slides needed. It was used in reversible donkey engines. Orenstein & Koppel used a similar one for their locos.

Regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
I suppose I should say, to eliminate any question, it's one or the other. IF I go to the workshop after I've been round the pub it's for thought or sleep, never to operate machinery, and after a couple of pub crawls I can (barely) remember a file would be considered machinery.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
314 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Posted By xo18thfa on 03/01/2009 11:29 AM
Jack: Here is a Hackworth layout diagram from Henry Greenly. I think the angle of the die block is a little steep. I would think it should be between 50 and 60 degrees at most.


http://1stclass.mylargescale.com/xo18thfa/Hackworth.jpg

Bob




Bob,

Thanks, though not precisely what I was looking for that is helpful in understanding Hackworth.

Regards,

Jack
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top