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I ran across a product called Gorilla Snot . It is an economy version of a commercial soil stabilizer from Soilworks. You mix it with water and spray it on a surface and it creates a covering that soaks into the surface. When it dries, it is no longer water soluble and pretty much impervious to anything. It is clear and you have to look hard to see that it is there. I've talked to guys who have had problems with wind erosion over an area where copper wires are buried. Once the wind exposed the copper wires, it didn't take long for the copper thieves to see it and pull it up. They sprayed the entire area with Gorilla Snot. Once it dried, you couldn't tell it was there unless you walked across the area and tried to kick up some dust.

Anyhow, it looks like this stuff might be great for sub-roadbed, hills, maybe even ballast where you might have problems with washout. According to their web site, they use it to keep the dust down on construction roads and temporary runways, hiking/biking paths, landfills and golf course bunkers.

They tell you everything about it but its electrical conductivity specs. I'd hate to use it on ballast and have it short out the rails. But since it is mixed with water, which dries out of it, leaving a clear base, I don't think it should be a problem. I don't know if I'd want to put it down over the track though without careful testing on wiping it off the rails. It may hold the track down pretty good, though.

I'd be interested if anyone has heard of or used this product and what their experience was.
 

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It does sound interesting. $5.00 for a sample size 1 liter. We need some brave sole to give it a try and report back.
 

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A club memeber bought some stuff that had samples, can't remer the name. He tried it on my RR as per instructings and after a week or so nothing. It was used to keep ground from eroading before the grasses come in.
 
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