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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All:

Did the Gardentexture actually produce any European buildings? The mention starting this range on one page of their webpage with some nice results shown, but nothing anywhere else. It could be me tho, their website is not very easy to navigate IMO. For example, I cannot find their small interlocking tower in any of the building pages but it is on the home page?

Thanks-
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Well, got a reply from Mr Kelly.

After putting a lot of work into these, apparently the interest was underwhelming, and with the orders of the other buildings, these are on the backburner. Surprising wth the interest in RhB/Swiss modelling in the US and Canada.

A shame, looking at the prices for the US outline buildings, the Euro ones could be competitive with the plastic kits from Europe?
 

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Actually there are quite a few modellers of Swiss outline in the US in IIm and H0m. In my brief stint as a paying and card carying member of the ETE there were several Swiss guys there. I have three friends here in the south and one in Chicago that are modellers of Swiss outline and none post there.

PM me if you want more info.....
 

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Hi,

"Quite a few" is probably not enough for an US maker to offer kits or plans of European outline buildings .

Most people buy their stuff or have it made all over in the world anyway. If you need Swiss buildings in 1 : 22,5 you can try here:
http://www.holzmodellbausatz.de/ If you need more, simply draw and design them, ask the next laser-cutting firm to cut them for you.
You will find some glue and paint aroud the house.

Have Fun

Juergen
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Actually, I don't think we are dealing with large production numbers on either side of the fence. Many of the large scale wood kit builders I have bought from in the US won't build the kit until ordered. Not like Pola, Piko, etc. with the required tooling for plastics. Why many of these models duplicate.

Thanks for the "Wood Model Kits" website, I had forgot about that link.

Agreed on the scratchbuilding efforts, but the idea of someone doing the difficult Swiss log design was promising.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Posted By Fritz on 09/28/2008 3:51 PM


but the idea of someone doing the difficult Swiss log design was promising.


Never heard of difficult Swiss log design. Aren´t log buildings constructed the same way all over the world?

http://www.logassociation.org/directory/schools.php

Have Fun

Juergen





No, the interlocking is much different than used by others. Not seen it done in the 1:1 log house industry here in Tennessee either.
 

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Hi,

So what is so different about the Swiss interlocking system? You have to flatten the bottom and the top of the logs, interlock them at the corners lioke generatins all over the wold.
I suppose, the technique of loghouse building was brought to Americca by European settlers a few hundred years ago.

Today we have better machinery than our forefathers, but have to spend a fortune for the logs and the council permissions to erect one.

Have Fun

Juergen
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The US typical design is to use a round log, sometimes with flattened sides and almost never the "chevron" cut to interlock the logs.

One of my fellow friends and historians ran into some built like this in the West somewhere (Montana?) with a rock base. Roofs were gone, but the houses are intact, part of a former Swiss colony. Otherwise, here in the US, if you run into flat/square logs, these too did not have the cheveron interlock.

Here, our state of Tennessee is one of the mainstays of log house building to this day. However, these hosues go from true log homes to houses that look like "log" homes.

For more on the subject of early US log home construction and design (at least Eastern), find an old copy of the first book in the "Foxfire" series.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foxfire_books
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Juergen:

Thanks for the post, interesting stuff (and how much German I do not know) log building.

The final house was nice, what I would like to build one day.....only on the side of a hill here in Tennessee.
 
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