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Posted By markoles on 03/12/2008 1:31 PM

I thought about posting this there, but figured I would catch more attention here

Mark
How right you were.   There is a lesson in all this somewhere . . . 
 

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Mark.

I was going to suggest the "Extra" piece that came with this months Garden Railways, Kevin's booklet on build ing (and planting) a new garden railroad. But looks like Kev already hit a great little synopsis on it above..

By the way....Kevin, excellent job, I really enjoyed reading it. (Your insert in GW and your response above).
 

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Ron

As a moderator, perhaps I should have moved it in the first instance. But once the thread had been responded to here, then this is where all the responses will be.

Putting threads in the correct forum may or may not generate more responses ... but it will make the thread easier to find in future if the information is valuable in a reference context.

Regards ... Doug
 

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Posted By Dougald on 03/12/2008 1:10 PM
Mark

I would divide your question into two ... what general approach do you want to your garden (besides low maintenance/cover the ground) and then what plants will grow well

In terms of garden philosophy, do you want to "miniscape" ie must the plants look like models of real ones? or are you more in the school of the "realists" ie your train, though a model, runs in a real world where the plants are plants and don't necessarily resembe a model of anything? A decision on this will govern your choice of plantings and how you go about your garden.

I will leave the design question out here. But you will need to spend some times as it is just like planning scenic elements on an indoor model railroad.

For specific plants, morning sun only counts as shade to very ight sun for most plants. You will I think need to pick from shade loving to shade tolerant plants for your location. While shade loving plants often are large leaved (to make use of the available light) there are some that have fine structures and foliage. The annuall impatiens is one of these. There are also a number of mosses and pseudo-mosses (like scotch) which will do well in shady conditions as will a number of aggessive ground covers. Once you reach the stage of knowing what colour, leave structure and size of planting you desire in various locations, your local nursery can usually help with specific suggestions.


Regards ... Doug


As a modeller who puts emphasis on the "garden" aspect above all else, I would have to say that Doug's advice is dead-on, as always.

I can only add that plants are not maintenance-free. Once you've got groundcover you can no longer spray your weeds and they have to be pulled by hand, which can be quite a chore for some. Depending on conditions you may have to water frequently for good results. Plus there are pests and varmints to consider. To me, it's well worth it, but it can be a lot of work, and I have learned from many failures along the way.

Cheers...


 

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Pete,

Thanks for the advice and the picture.  I have been looking at the opposite view of that scene (its this month's MLS calendar picture).  Obviously, I have a lot to learn!! 

Doug - Going forward, I will try and post in the appropriate forum!   

Mark
 

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Posted By pdk on 03/14/2008 6:54 AM
Posted By Dougald on 03/12/2008 1:10 PM
Mark


I can only add that plants are not maintenance-free. Once you've got groundcover you can no longer spray your weeds and they have to be pulled by hand, which can be quite a chore for some. Depending on conditions you may have to water frequently for good results. Plus there are pests and varmints to consider. To me, it's well worth it, but it can be a lot of work, and I have learned from many failures along the way.

Cheers...


Agreed.

Building a garden railroad is simple compared to maintaining a garden railroad.  You can put the building aspect aside, but weeds and the elements never sleep.

I put no less than 6 hours a week maintenance into mine, and that's during the off season.  I can easily spend over 20 hours a weeks during the growing season and more than 30 hours a week getting ready for open house season.

And the more grandure you build into your empire, the more maintenance you have to do.  ;)
 

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I'd have to weed those areas that are mulched anyway, so that's fine with me.  

I am glad I started this thread because it got me thinking in a different direction.  I know MB is excited that I am not talking about boxcars and locomotives (as much).   She's cautiously embracing the idea of the garden.

I was looking for old pictures of the Bachmann 4-4-0 last night, and opened a 2002 GR and found one.   In that magazine is an article about dwarf trees!! Author's name escapes me now, but he's got this awesome live steam layout in southern california.  Runs from the front yard to the back and there's some huge harbor there, too.  Anyway,  I forgot I had all those issues back that far, so its time to dust them off and read through some of the gardening tips!! And she wondered why I kept all those issues!   The trees looked really neat, and it was basically dwarf trees and groundcover that comprised the garden side of his layout.  

Mark
 

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Posted By markoles on 03/14/2008 12:02 PM
I'd have to weed those areas that are mulched anyway, so that's fine with me.  

I am glad I started this thread because it got me thinking in a different direction.  I know MB is excited that I am not talking about boxcars and locomotives (as much).   She's cautiously embracing the idea of the garden.

I was looking for old pictures of the Bachmann 4-4-0 last night, and opened a 2002 GR and found one.   In that magazine is an article about dwarf trees!! Author's name escapes me now, but he's got this awesome live steam layout in southern california.  Runs from the front yard to the back and there's some huge harbor there, too.  Anyway,  I forgot I had all those issues back that far, so its time to dust them off and read through some of the gardening tips!! And she wondered why I kept all those issues!   The trees looked really neat, and it was basically dwarf trees and groundcover that comprised the garden side of his layout.  

Mark


I think you mean Jack Verducci's RR up in the southern part of the SF Bay Area (northen California) with "Fog Harbor."  Very Nice Indeed!  See the links:

http://gold.mylargescale.com/dwightennis/verducci/verducci.htm

http://www.mindspring.com/~dwightennis/NMRA_Con_Layout_Photos/Jack_Verducci_G/Jack_Verducci.htm

It is the garden that sell the women/wives on the idea!  I can't tell you how many times people have come over and the wife was against the whole idea until they saw the T&LBRR and realized how well the two could be integrated into their own world.  :cool:
 

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Mark,

I agree with the others. It's best to check with your local nursery, especially someone who REALLY knows his/her products. If all else fails, contact Sharon Yankee of Miniforests by Sky www.miniforest.com. Her phone # is 503-632-3555. She is extremely knowledgeable and helpful. Shew lives is Oregon where it gets cold, too.

Tom Rey
 

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Getting our home built so maybe we can start playing with trains again!
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I haven't read through all of the posts yet so please excuse me if these are repeats. Sedums, mosses, phlox, dwarf Alberta spruce, spirea are all some we have used in KC. Here we have little to no direct sun so............ there are a few sedums, mosses and other things in the periwinkle (vinca) family that work. We also have a few ferns, ivy and a couple grasses that Martha has looked at. Ivy and vinca can be invasive though.  Our idea is to keep things more along the lines of garden with a railroad not a railroad with a garden. But that's just us. ;)
 

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Once you have decided on an overall plan for landscaping the back yard, you may find the extra storage is needed. Having a garden cabin in the garden can be a beautiful accessory to add. It can give your garden a personality like nothing else. However, if you are not careful it can be very expensive. What is more, if you want your cabin to be very sturdy, durable, and easy to maintain, then it is best to go for the wood material like spruce, pine or cedar.
 
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