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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm considering building a small elevated layout in the back yard and am trying to decide on which track is the most bang for the buck. I want code 250 since it seems most common. Radius will be 8'-10'. I will be running both standard gauge and ng trains. I plan on running live steam but may wire it for guests.

I am aware of Llagas Creek, MicroEnginering, Sunset Valley, and Accucraft. Are there others I should be considering? I will be wanting 250' so price is important as is durability. Is aluminum rail ok or should I go for brass?


I'd appreciate any insight on the various brands and their advantages and short comings.

Jack
 

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If you are running track power some times, I would not run aluminum. It's a pain for most people with track power in regular usage. If you were to electrify it occasionally for guests, I think you might find more problems with joiners "just sitting", i.e. stuff going wrong by itself.

I would recommend brass, and solder jumpers for track power. That will keep cost down and only require cleaning when running track power.

Regards, Greg
 

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Llagas makes Nickle-Silver.
Sunset Valley makes brass and stainless, if I recall.
 

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If you are going with code 250 track power I would go with nickle silver from Llagas or Sunset Valley or the new Sunset Valley stainless. I know it costs more but cutting corners with your trackwork will frustrate you in the long run. You can have the best models in the world but if things don't run well it spoils the whole thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The only reason for power on the rails is to accomodate the occassional guest. I have no plans of running electric off the track. NS or stainless is outside of my budget.

Jack
 

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Posted By Jack - Freshwater Models on 11/15/2008 6:12 PM
I want code 250 since it seems most common. Radius will be 8'-10'.




Actually, I think code 332 is the most common. Much more durable. You can walk on it without any fear of the rails popping out of the tie strips or rails bending. Code 250 is certainly more to scale and looks great. You may also have some issues will large wheel flanges on some locos. Nothing wrong with using 250, you just need to know why 332 exists. (I am sure this will draw comments from both camps)
 

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If you're not going to be running power most of the time, I sure wouldn't bother wiring it. You may find that it's a lot of trouble trying to get things in working order for your guests. Especially so if you don't have any track powered locomotives yourself.


I'd recommend that you just go with aluminum code 250 if you really want bang for your buck. With this, you can run your live steam to your heart's content. Your guests can bring over live steam or battery powered locomotives. Neither one will require any extra effort on your part.


I don't think that you'll find anything cheaper than code 250 aluminum.
 

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I have to agree with Bruce. It probably won't be worth the effort to wire and maintain track power for occasional use. Code 250 aluminum will do just fine for everything else.
 

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I think code 250 makes the trains look real, the code 332 makes them look like toys. I have had all sorts run on my SVRR code 250 over 15 years and never had a problem with any flanges/etc. IF you are not using track power, and don't want to spend extra for NS, I'd go with aluminum and your friends can bring battery or live steam.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Jerry,

I have to agree with you about code 332 being a bit of a caracature. Really it's more suitable for 3/4" scale. I think 250 aluminum will be the way I go and just appoligise to electric friends.

Jack
 
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