G Scale Model Train Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
581 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have to purchase a handy man's compressor, a DeWalt or Porter Cable etc to run a nailer.  What add-ons would I need to use this to operate an air brush other than the air brush itself of course.

Thank you

Robert
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
658 Posts
You need a pressure regulator and a good air filter with a water seperator. Also, depending on your airbrush requirements, you might need an adaptor to connect the airbrush into your filter/regulator.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
581 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
You've probably all seen this unit at your local Home Depot or Sears.  Its the Porter-Cable portable 6 gallon 90psi compressor.  I believe it would be ample for air brushing, but my question is if I choose to use it to paint garden furniture, drive a few nails from time to time will it be adequate?  I don't plan to use it to shingle a roof or paint a "real" car or anything of that nature.  Your opinions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you

Robert
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,093 Posts
Posted By Robert on 01/11/2008 7:17 AM
You've probably all seen this unit at your local Home Depot or Sears.  Its the Porter-Cable portable 6 gallon 90psi compressor.  I believe it would be ample for air brushing, but my question is if I choose to use it to paint garden furniture, drive a few nails from time to time will it be adequate?  ....


Absolutely.  I use one that size for everything.  Make sure you have an oil/water separator if using it to air brush.  As Bill said...I learned a lot about "different" standards for hooking up air machines and brushes.  I finally went out and bought a set of connectors and changed all my tools to ONE standard.  

And...I'm expanding my list of air tools...and thinking about putting in an air supply run of piping and connectors to move the connections closer to my work bence....and avoid all that hose laying on the floor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
My advice would be to buy an oiled compressor versus an oil less one, but most compact and home owner units are oil less.  However, the comments about getting a very good filter/water separator are something you need to pay attention to!  Air compressors (oil less in particular) tend to pull a significant amount of water out of the air, and it can and probably will be picked up when you least want it i.e. in the middle of the 2nd or third coat of a paint run.   

l ruined a couple of good paint  jobs when water in the air stream splattered on the piece.  /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/sad.gifI also ruined the nozzle assembly of my plasma cutter with internal rust when I ran it with out a dryer/filter and then just put it up./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/crying.gif 

The replacement parts were about $400 for  my lesson in the dynamics of compressed gasses and I bought a replaceable dryer filter for about $100.  Hard lesson learned....../DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/blush.gif

Another thing you will want to do is drain the water out of the tank periodically if not every time used to keep build up and rusting to a minimum.

You additionally may want to make up oiler type line to insert when using nailers and other air tools like drills, shears etc., to help lubricate those tools.  I now use a 60 gallon vertical 5 hp oil filled unit instead of a compact oil less, with an in line 4"diameter oil/water separator and still utilize a dryer and oil filter when painting or using the plasma cutter,  and I drain my tank weekly since it's pressured all the time./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/whistling.gif

Mark
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
581 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Gentlemen

Thank you for the very helpful information.  Now what would a dryer filter look like and what is meant by a oiler line.  I'll do some web searching but thought I'd post the additional questions here also.

Thanks

Robert
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,093 Posts
Air dryer....not a filter...a machine for those into SERIOUS painting http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40211 . This is the kind of machine used by folks that do professional painting where multiple coats are required or lots of masking or you staining furniture.

I'm assuming an oil filter is exactly that....a paper filter that is in line with the output of the oil/water separator.

What I use... http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=92261 . This is JUST an oil/water separator.

I've never thought of an oiler...but that's a good idea. It would allow you to avoid having to oil the air tool as often. I would imagine that tire shops use these things to keep the impact wrenches they use lubricated.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5 Posts
Don't be confused by Air Filters / regulators / and lubricators. Look at Page 935 of the Mcmaster Carr catalog where they give a GREAT description of air filtration and cleaning. The use of a lubricator in the same line that you connect to ANY kind of a paint gun WILL RUIN YOUR paint job.

There are two ways to do this:
Paint from a separate line off your compressor that does NOT have a lubricator installed. Run your other air tools off a lubricated line.... keeps 'em running nicely.

If it is not convenient to separate the feed lines, run the line you are going to use for painting through a VERY GOOD (definition: not bargain basement), set of filters and air dryers. Available at Mcmaster or other reputable sources. I would be careful when buying something this important from Harbor Freight.

The HUGE cooler that was posted earlier is nothing to consider. When air is compressed, it gets hot. Unless you are compressing way over 30 CFM, that will NEVER be an issue.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
436 Posts
You don’t need an expensive water trap what you need to do is put a minimum 20 or 30 feet of hose between your compressor and your water trap...this distance will allow the water vapor to cool down enough for the water trap to do its job... I don’t use an oiler I just use “gun” oil in the tool at least once before use… I use a 25 year old commercial 240v 6hp compressor @ 140 pounds that is has been plugged in continuously for over 15 years…powering nail guns and mechanic’s tools, as well as my air brush….if you’re going to leave it plugged in all the time the trick to long life for your air compressor is to install a check valve in the discharge line and install a “head un-loader” that will take the head pressure off the reed valves…
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
581 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Gentlemen

I'm so glad I posted the question.  Your responses are very helpful to me.  It is all information I didn't previously understand.

Thank you.

Robert
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,007 Posts
Robert,
Deans suggestion on a long line is a good one, I would also add that it helps to roll the line up and let it drop. Sort of like rolling up a garden hose and storing on the side of your house. That way the air gets cooled down and the water is trapped in the hose by gravity. You will need to blow the line out ever so often or you will get water sputtering out .
Also, if this is your first attempt air brushing, keep in mind that nailers require a higher pressure than an air brush. The higher the pressure on the air brush the more likely you will have some orange pealing on your paint. I would keep the airbrush as low as you can get below 30 psi. Of couse, if you want to give your model a dusted look, you can turn the pressure up a little over 30 psi and hold it farther from the object.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
The dryer I was talking about is an in line cannister type with a multistage water separator/filter unit.  I got it at the welding supply house for $100 and it eliminated the water issue for both the plasma cutter and my occasional paint job./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/satisfied.gif

The Oiler is on a separate dedicated line which is never utilized for painting.  I still lube the tools them selves with oil, but when I get going on a big repair or build I like the fact I get some additional lubrication from the oiler to the machine.  Just have always been around or worked in shops that utilized them on their assembly stations.

I don't particularly like to trap the water via condensation in the line since when you pressure it up to 90+ for framing nailers or grinders it comes spitting out./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/crazy.gif  I think having the water separator trap the water after 20 or so feet sounds like something that would work, may try it with a pipe based work station extension I'm thinking about putting in the center of the barn.:)

good luck 
Mark
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,007 Posts
Mark,
The traps that I've always seen in the cabinet shops I work at are made of copper pipe. The are always bent to form either a spiral or a series of loops over a distances. I think this is the same method used by steam engines. They are usually combined with a filter but you're going to catch a lot more water from cooled down air than you can from air straight from the compressor.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
105 Posts
I don't remember anyone mentioning this but if you're not planning on hauling the compressor around anywhere, then get the largest canister you can afford that will fit in the space you want it.  Compressors are one of those "expandable use" type tools.  If you get a small pancake style, you'll find that they have a tendency to turn on a lot more often when using an air brush.  The noise is near unbearable in an open shop.
My first purchase was a small 3 gallon pancake style and I burned it out in about a year from trying to use tools that needed large volumes of air.  The poor machine kept running and running every time I used large nailers or even if I was just topping off the air pressure in my tires.
I broke down and bought a 33 gallon Craftsman oiless for my second purchase.  It's still a little loud but not as bad as the little one was and it doesn't turn on near as often.  Extra added bonus.  I save seventy-five bucks every fall blowing out my own lawn sprinklers.

Mark

 
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top