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Okay, got your attention. Found this kit to make a GG-1 out of folded paper. It's 1/56 scale so a simple doubling should work out fine. Before you laugh, remember IT Uncles paper trains? Beef it up a bit here and there and it could work out. Once my Challenger is done, may look into it. Free PDF download from Canon of the pages and another pdf of the instructions.
http://dailydiy.com/2008/12/15/paper-craft-gg1-type-electric-locomotive/
 

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Where did you get the challenger paperprint? HAH?
Manfred Diel #1313
 

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Yep one thing about those Neb winters you have more time on your hands and come up with some odd projects. Later RJD
 

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Jerry,

I won't ask how you found that....

Seriously, don't the Japanese do wondorous things with paper and 16mm scale?

Les
 

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Jerry,
That link is to the A4 size kit. I f you want to print out on regular letter size paper (110 lb. is best), go here and download the LTR versions;
http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/2027/gg1/index.html
The Canon kits are well designed and not hard to build, but this one is ink-greedy, so be prepared!
Chris
 

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Korm,

As luck would have it, I don't have the software on my computer to run the vids. I did learn something important: on the large engines/streetcars (?) the center set of trucks slide laterally for curves. This opens up interesting possiblilities for my LR tramway.

I'm just daydreaming here, because this is a long time in the future, but: when I get the main layout 'finished', I really really want a tram to deliver coal/small whatnots to all the industries/sites. Now, the mine RR will be 18" -- S ga -- and the layout will be tight (or full, depending on your point of view) but I do want Light Rail freight. I'm guessing at 12", still in 1:20 scale, the tracks of which will weasel between and around and across (or under) where necessary, the other three guages. (45mm, O, and S = .808 ga) I forget what O ga is, but its major reason is to provide dual gauge trunkline with the 45mm. Everything will be the same scale, 1:20, thus NG by definition.

So, you can see that very narrow track ga is necessary, and also tight radii. But challenges like this, and building an x-4-4-x for the trunkline are the sort of things that light up my life. Besides, I'm almost besotted by the creations over on the Microscale board. That's where the sliding truck caught my attention.

Now, back to the point of this thread: about a year ago I discovered the Japanese paper construction and glued up some file folders in order to bend, work and whatnot to see if I could build something. While they were drying, someone came and moved them and they disappeared. The frustration was immense, and I swore I wouldn't try anything else until I had a place to work on trains where they were unmolested. (I found the sheets while cleaning up downstairs when preparing to actually start on my RR). Three or four sheets glued together seem to approximate light gauge aluminum--the 'feel' as I bend them in the brake is about the same. And that's as far as I know. Well, I wouldn't hesitate to use paper, but it'll need bracing and likely, some care in handling the finished article.

Les
 

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Yeah, Jerry

I stumbled onto him somehow. His work is utterly amazing. See my post to Korm about my aborted experiments with file folders laminated together. It's promising, if you want to try it.

Les
 

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It is approx 210 mm x 297mm or approx 8 1/4" x 11 5/8"
Slightly taller and slightly narrower....
A-4 is the standard size sheet the rest of the worlds uses compared to the 8.5" x 11" used here in the states.

Regards,

Todd
 

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Posted By Idraw4u on 02/04/2009 8:22 AM
It is approx 210 mm x 297mm or approx 8 1/4" x 11 5/8"
Slightly taller and slightly narrower....
A-4 is the standard size sheet the rest of the worlds uses compared to the 8.5" x 11" used here in the states.

Regards,

Todd


Yet still all printers come with letter as default sheet size :)
I have collected a bucketload of different paper kits over the last few years, lot's of insight into sheet modelling, and it's not a long stretch to use plasticcard instead of paper ;) just an idea.
A good place for euro models is here kartonmodell-forum
 

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And having looked at the GG1 I'd say a few of the Karton-model ones would be far easier as a starter :)
 

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Yet still all printers come with letter as default sheet size :)" src="http://www.mylargescale.com/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/smile.gif" align="absMiddle" border="0" />
I have collected a bucketload of different paper kits over the last few years, lot's of insight into sheet modelling, and it's not a long stretch to use plasticcard instead of paper ;)" src="http://www.mylargescale.com/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/wink.gif" align="absMiddle" border="0" /> just an idea.
A good place for euro models is here kartonmodell-forum





Yep... The U.S. is the only county that predominantly uses letter size paper. Therefore every other country in the world must be wrong! haha...
I work in the IP industry and we consistently have to reformat letter size drawings to fit on A-4 for international filing. The funny thing is the US PTO is happy to accept drawings on A-4 paper, so if another country prepares formal drawings they don't need to be reformatted to file it the US Patent office.
I really hate metric, but sometimes we (Americans) make things overly difficult. Sometimes it is easier to just capitulate...
 

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Posted By cjwalas on 02/04/2009 12:06 PM
A4 paper is hard to get in the US. I have in-laws in Europe send me some. If you're not worried about the scale, most printers will automatically resize the image to fit on letter size. The model comes out a little smaller.
Chris

You can often print to 100% and just ignore the warnings as usually the content is inside the letter format anyway.
And I find that most have to be resized anyway, so you can set it up to whatever you want.
I am fortunate that the business I work for has bought an A3+ (double the size of A4 and then some) printer, so now I can even fit gauge one frames on single sheets, wich is a problem with standard A4/letter printers
 

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Posted By cjwalas on 02/04/2009 12:06 PM
A4 paper is hard to get in the US. I have in-laws in Europe send me some. If you're not worried about the scale, most printers will automatically resize the image to fit on letter size. The model comes out a little smaller.
Chris
Chris

Don't you guys have OfficeMax stores on the left coast? Cause here in Florida they carry A4 size copy paper by Boise (i.e. X9 Copy Paper, 92 Bright, 500 Sheets/Ream, 20lb. Item# 21151673).
 

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Some day we in this country will see the light
and adopt the metric system. Until then we will be the odd man out.
 
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