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Half awake, putting on the morning coffee. This was the last thing that I expected to see looking out my kitchen window.



 

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At least they weren't standing on your 400' long bird perch. .

Then you could hit one with you K-27 and have dinner for Thanksgiving.


Roger Cutter

RGS East
 

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You have my Sympathy

The re-introduction of the turkeys here , really does piss me off , because the re-introduction of deer years ago , brought about a LARGE increase of TICKS , and then the turkeys brought about even more TICKS .

Its unbeliveable how many ticks there are now , and as kids [ in the early 50's ] we constantly were playing in the woods , I had only ever saw a dog tick , the big slow ones .

But now , good grief .
in one flock I counted 28 birds


http://www.harrisoncountyhealth.com/ticks_and_diseases.htm




The lone star tick is slightly smaller than the American dog tick, but has much longer mouth parts. The female has a single white spot near the center of her back. The males and nymphs are much smaller than the females. All three stages -- larvae, nymphs, and adults -- are quite active and walk fast. The lone star tick differs from the American dog tick in that all three active stages will attach to humans. The immature stages of the lone star tick are sometimes referred to as "seed ticks" or "turkey ticks", "turkey mites" or even "deer ticks", and will attach to ground-feeding birds and be carried to distant locations. Lone star ticks are very common in southern Indiana, and high populations can be found in Harrison County. Adults appear in late March. Their numbers peak in May and June, declining in July. Nymphs appear in April, peak in May and June, and can be found throughout the summer. Larvae appear in the spring and again in the fall, but are not usually encountered in the middle of the summer.



The lone star tick can also harbor the bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever (see above). In addition, lone star ticks infected with Ehrlichia chaffeensis, the cause of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), have been collected Crawford, Perry, and Orange counties, as well as others. Human ehrlichiosis can be treated with antibiotics such as tetracycline



The black-legged tick is the smallest of the three ticks described here. In the picture at the left, blacklegged ticks are shown compared with sesame seeds and a dime. The female, the largest, on the left, is oval in shape, mahogany in color, and has long mouth parts. The male, center, is smaller and has shorter mouth parts. The nymph and larva are very small; the nymph is not much larger than the size of the period at the end of this sentence. Adult blacklegged ticks appear in Indiana in September, seeking their preferred host, white-tailed deer. They can be found in October and November and on warm days throughout the winter. Nymph activity peaks in June; larvae peak in August. Nymphs appear to be the main vectors of Lyme disease to humans and pets. Adult black-legged ticks are rarely found on humans, but they do feed on dogs and cats.
The blacklegged tick arrived relatively recently in Indiana -- the first specimens were collected in Porter County in 1987. Established populations have been found in the northwest quadrant of the state, though they have been found throughout the State
 

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There is something to be said for "FRESH" turkeys that were never forzen.

What do they eat anyway?
 

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Posted By Jerry Barnes on 10/20/2008 12:17 PM
You DON"T want them around, are real pests and pretty aggressive.
jb


I had to turn around behind an auto-repair place once and saw a whole flock of turkeys coming through a hole in a fence that looked like it was designed to keep the turkeys "IN". They gathered around my car like they had no fear of humans. I "carefully" drove away and went around the block to the house that had the fence behind it to tell the people that their turkeys were getting away. The fellow that answered the door was quite irate at my bothering him. "Don't raise no turkeys! Go away!"

I asked at the next house and they said they were wild turkeys and the fellow next door had been trying to keep them OUT of his yard. (I then figured he should have at least been appreciative that I told him there was a hole in his fence, but apparently not.)

Anyway, what would happen if a person were to grab a live turkey in that situation? I realize one would be a handfull but if you were quick you might be able to snap its neck before it did much flailing around. Well... MAYBE! Anybody ever try that? What would the other turkeys do... scatter or defend the one in your hand?
 

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I waz gonna say, if ya had a shotgun ya could have saved a few bucks for Thanksgiving, but those birds dont look like they'd be much more than a plate full apiece.
 

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I don't know what the laws are in your neck of the woods, but around here, it's illegal to kill a wild turkey without a hunting permit, and then only in specific loactions and in season.

Now, if one were to "accidentally" meet its maker, I don't see any harm in putting it to good use. ;)
 

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Posted By DKRickman on 10/20/2008 2:30 PM
I don't know what the laws are in your neck of the woods, but around here, it's illegal to kill a wild turkey without a hunting permit, and then only in specific loactions and in season.

Now, if one were to "accidentally" meet its maker, I don't see any harm in putting it to good use. ;)" src="http://www.mylargescale.com/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/wink.gif" align="absMiddle" border="0" />


Kind of depends on how the law is worded... "taking" game birds out of season or "hunting" game birds out of season. I remember a flap many years ago of a lady that was cited for fishing without a license when she caught a fish... she beat the rap because she said she was not "fishing"... had no pole or bait (live or artificial lures) and was not in the river for the purpose of obtaining a fish... she just happened to catch it in her hands while in the river waiting to be picked up after falling from water skis.

I listen to the County Sheriff and State Police calls on my scanner and I often hear someone has hit a deer and are requesting it to be tagged so they can have it butchered... one night I heard one fellow get denied the tag and then he was arrested for hunting out of season... apparently the officer noted tire tracks showing that he had chased the deer off the road and back with his truck. The officer said it was a multi-point buck, too.
 

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This is the state of New Jersey, if there is a way to add a fee or a tax our law makers will find it. So the answer is Yes, there is a hunting license to hunt Wild Turkeys. But, as in most things only if you get caught.
 

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Wild turkeys can be very agressive. The times when they are agressive is in the spring when they begin their mating cycle lasts about a month. What happens is that the males (gobblers a.k.a toms and the young males aka jakes are will compete for to mate with as many hens as possible. I am sure some of you have heard about turkeys attacking mail men what have ya. This does happen as they see the colors red blue and it makes them act very agressive. This happens in suburbs however rairly happens in the country rural areas. I have hunted turkeys and watched turkeys for 14 years and I have even seen males kill males. Survial of th fitest. They eat worms bugs seeds thats why if you walk in the woods and see a large area where the leaves are all kicked up it's called turkey scratches. However turkeys are easily spooked by just about anything. They have excellent vision and the tall tale of them being color blind is false as they can pick up on the slightest movements. Turkeys do carry ticks so if you have animals make sure you give them a good look over.
 

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Put a fence up horizontaly and throw feed under it. They will bend over and walk under and eat and when they raise their heads and it goes up through the fence they won't have enough brains to bend over and walk under and you will trap them. They are very stupid....Don't get caught!!! For my 2 cents I think all the releasing of critters like this will cause an increase in big cats, which by the way, they are releasing as well. then when the food dries up the young cats will stalk children like in Vancover. In KY two years ago they even released rattlesnakes......what idiots!
 
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