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Floor nailer questions (3)

I purchased a floor nailer from Harbor Freight to install ¾” oak flooring. I already have an 18” gauge nailer ($20 from Harbor Freight) that nails brads up to 2”. However, everyone I spoke with said a floor nailer is a specialty tool b/c it sort of fits around tongue or grove better (although the first 2 rows must be nailed manually).

I use my all-purpose nailer for stuff like making ladder tracks and other model building (7/8 scale). Since the floor nailer is a “specialty tool,” the question arises:

1. Can you think of ways the floor nailer could be used for train projects (shoots nails and big staples). Perhaps one of you have used one.

2. Instructions say:

“Add a few drops of Pneumatic Tool Oil to the airline connection before operation. Add a few more drops after each hour of continual use.”

a. Does this mean to shoot oil into the air hose? No description given on how to actually oil.

b. I’m assuming the oil gets shot by air thru the nailer to lubricate. I’ve never oiled my cheaper all-purpose nailer and now I’m wondering if I should have oiled that in a similar manner.

Thanks!

Floor nailer
http://search.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do?keyword=floor+nailer&Submit=Go

my cheaper all-purpose nailer used for bents, ladder work and so on

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=46309
 

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The floor nailer's that Iam familiar with are a very specialized tool, flooring is the only use I can see. I would say that all air operated tools should be lubricated by dropping a couple of drops of oil directly in the air fitting at the tool. The oil will then work its way thru the moving parts.
 

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Good Morning,
Always check the tool instructions before oiling. There are some that do not need oil, and oiling them is bad. For the ones that do need oil we just put a drop or two of air tool oil in the air input before use. In line air oilers are available that meter the oil out, but thin you have to remember to fill them up. Oiling the tool every time I pick it up is easer for me to remember.


Phillip 
 

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The nailer will probably be to big for any R.R. projects, they have quite a kick to them when you smack it with a mallet. I've used one of those for many years and the best thing is to keep it oiled every couple of hours or it will jam up on you. I did hardwood flooring for ten years, until the economy slowed down, now nobody wants to spend the money. Good luck.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for tips, I'll let you know if I later find a use.

Pete,

Labor was more than materials; I couldn't.
 

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Does it shoot nails, staples, or special serrated flooring flat nails? If the frame is set up to shoot tongue and groove it isn't really set up for anything else and if it is like mine and shoots up to a 2" 15 ga staple it will crush anything smaller than 3/4" tongue and groove. I needed a 15 ga. finish nailer also and got a great deal on one off of E Bay.flooring.
 

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Dave,

You can rent floor nailers at most rental shops including many of the Home Depots in the area. Definitely a specialty tool because of the fit and angle. As said above just a couple of drops of pneumatic tool oil in the tool itself where the air hose connects.

-Brian
 
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