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Discussion Starter #1
Recently I used my flexible spine system to build 40ft of tack out in the woods for my "Have Train, Will Travel." My radio controlled RGS #40 provided good power.





I cut 10ft 3/4" PVC electical conduit into 3 pieces and clamped on wood blocks about every 20". The wood blocks can be adjusted to level the track which is very important to keeping the train on the track. Dowels are screwed inside the pipe between sections. Flat black paint works well to camoflage the spine.








The spine is nailed to the ground with 6" nails. This keeps the pipe from twisting so that the block can be leveled.





A bridge was built with piers made of wood stakes. The spine is attached to the piers with plastic tubes that allow for height adjustment, or is simply wired or screwed to the top of the wood stake.





Track is attached to the wood blocks with 1 5/8" sheet rock screws in predrilled holes on the inside of the rail.








Kids really enjoyed playing with my push train.





Smile for the camera.





I like the adjustability of the flexible spine system and I am using a variation of it on my permanent garden railroad.


Terl
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Notice in the forth picture from the top, straight pieces of unaltered LGB pieces of track laying on the ground next to the spine. By putting wood blocks at the ends and middles of curves I was able to bend the straight track into a gentle S curve. This is a big plus to this system. You can move the blocks to where they are needed to hold the track in the shape you want.

Terl
 

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Another great Idea. something I could use for a temporary track that could be removed going across my patio to a car shed. May have to try this. Later RJD
 

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Teri, if possible could you take some more pictures of your "Spine System"? Specifically pictures of the the finished section (Fourth picture from top). I am wanting to see exactly how much flex the track was giving to make it curve. I am so excited about your system that I am (hoping and praying) that I can start in about week. I had an idea close to yours but just couldn't figure out how to balance the track. After looking at your pictures again last night, inspiration hit like a ton of bricks. I can't help but say "Thank you!!!!"
Your biggest cheerleader.....

Biff
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This picture shows that I was able to displace the track about 3 inches to the side when I made the S curve.





This picture shows the hole drilled in the blocks for the spine. Two sheet rock screws provide the clamping force.





To make the blocks, I cut 1 1/4" thick stock to tie length (3 1/2"). I drill two holes for the clamping screws. I drill a big hole to match the spine (15/16"). Then I rip the block in half on my table saw. The kerf of the blade gives enough space in the block so that the screws can clamp with enough force.


Terl
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Radius of the curves in the above railroad is about 6 to 8 feet. It is abit of a struggle to get smaller curves, because the plastic tubing naturally varies the curvature in a bend. I have used a similar method on some 3 foot radius curves on my freinds layout, but I had to be careful to match the constant curvature of the track. If you want to use 2 foot radius curves I would recomend that you use the plastic pipe on the straight sections, but use individual wood blocks nailed to the ground for the tight curves.

Here's an idea that I haven't tried yet. Cut some 3 1/2" diameter circular pads out of 1/2" plywood. For the center hole, drill the hole at a slight slant or about 5 degrees from vertical. When the pad is nailed to the ground, rotating the pad should give some adjustment to level the pad for the track to be screwed to. On the other hand it just might be easier to drill the hole vertical and just try to eyeball the pad level when you nail it down.

TERL
 

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Terl, first, please except my apology for getting your name wrong, second... Thank you for the new idea. I will give it a try.

Biff
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Biff

Yes I look forward to seeing your efforts and receiving feedback on this system. I have an unusual name so I am used to people confusing it with a more common name, besides the print on these computer screens is often not easy to read. I confuse small n's and m's all the time.

Terl
 

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hmmm.. this is *NOT* the thread I was thinking of... but it's yet *ANOTHER* possible way to create an inexpensive right of way. Thanks for the inspiration, Terl
 
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