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I have just gotten the opportunity to expand my railroad empire to the outdoors, with one caveat. I must use some sort of table structure instead of laying the works on the ground or using some sort of cribbed and raised ground surface.



I remember vivid images of a fantastic outdoor train surface on this website, made with wire cloth, weed paper, and supported upon wooden table structures, but I cannot find the posts online. The weed paper and wire cloth structure allowed for perfect drainage, and the track was supported with some handmade wooden ladder structure, affixed directly to the wood support frame for the table.



Can anyone here help point me to the posts discussing this topic?
 

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That is it! Fantastic!

I do not know why I could not find that in any of my searches of the site.

Thanks again for your help!
 

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I cheated! I had downloaded the whole pdf several years ago and it had the MLS documentation on the pdf.
Glad I could help ! It is an awesome table system isn't it
Larry
 

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If you're a glutton for punishment
here is a link to...

Richard Smith's - POC RR Vol. II (PDF 22.11MB)[/b]
 

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ALL, I don't have any info on how well this holds up, and I don't (exactly) want to hijack this thread, but I just got home from a club meet where the entire layout is from two to three feet off the ground. The construction is NOT wood, so there will be rot or deterioration. The builder used telescoping pvc pipes. The larger is driven into the ground about 6-8 inches (we've got no freeze in winter) and stick above the ground a foot or foot and a half. The smaller pipe fits inside. The elevation is determined and set with a screw (or two). If necessary, the height can be adjusted.

On top of these posts the roadbed is laid, and the track upon it. It sounds like a lot of work, but he is well satisfied with how it looks and how it works.
I took some pictures today. If they show the posts and beams, I'll attach them here somehow, or put them in the photo section.
 

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Winn

While Richard would be the one to give you any definitive answers, however, he started the raised layout in July 2002 and has continued with its building to present day, so it must be holding up fairly well.


Rick Marty[/b] (over on LSC, eighth & tenth posts down) also uses a raised layout using similar construction methods to Richard's and his also seems to be holding up as well.
 

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Thanks Steve, I don't plan to do that now but if I ever have to move from my present home I might consider something like that. That is if I'm not too old to do anything!
 
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