G Scale Model Train Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

· Premium Member
Joined
·
5,120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If ever there was a chameleon locomotive on the EBT's roster, #1 was it. It was one of the first two locos on the EBT, having been built in 1873 to the same drawings as the D&RGW's "Sho-wa-no" 2-6-0. (See David Fletcher's version on his web site). In researching the loco, I found no fewer than 6 variations--different pilots, domes, no extended smokebox, extended smokebox, then an entirely new boiler altogether (All the Airplane fans just said "then an entirely new boiler"), running boards moved up and down; then when it was sold to the Tuscarora Valley in 1911, an air pump and yet another front pilot (with automatic coupler). 
Here's some examples: This is the earliest photo I came across, and is probably as close to her original appearance as possible. The original Baldwin ornate paint is barely visible on the tender. The second steam dome was added at some point by the railroad.




I've always wanted to build a model of this loco. There were two possibilities for starting points. Aster's original JNR mogul would provide me with what I needed for a live steam version--including the funky three-axle tender. Alas, I missed a chance to buy one at a very good price, and since it's slip-eccentric and runs on only one cylinder, wouldn't be a good fit for my kind of operation anyway. (That doesn't mean that--someday--I might get one and build #2, a twin to #1.) The other option was starting with an LGB mogul. The drivers are the right size, albeit spaced a few inches too far apart, and the tender is close-ish. (That's a technical term meaning "close enough to where the compromise is worth not dealing wtih the headache of scratchbuilding.") I recently acquired an LGB mogul, so I was finally able to start.
The LGB mogul is 1:22.5, so one would think it might scale well for a small 1:20 mogul. While this is largely the case, it's actually too large for this diminutive loco, so pretty much everything above the chassis went into the parts box. That left me with a chassis and tender tank as the only surviving parts. (The rest has since been sent on to another modeler.) What I didn't realize, though, was how much cleaner my parts box was going to get as a result of this project...
The locomotive ended up being somewhat of a "Frankenstein" locomotive. I was prepared for a healthy amount of scratchbuilding on this project, but soon discovered that going through such lengths wouldn't be as necessary as I had thought. I had in my parts box some old Delton C-16 kits that I had picked up for a song. Having now conclude that the drive in those units is pretty much worthless, what I had intended to do with those will now be done using the new Aristo version. This freed up these components for "experimentation." My first look went to the boiler and smokebox. It was the right diameter in 1:20, and had very nice looking domes. They are not in quite the same place as the prototype, but it was close-ish. Since the domes on this loco moved around anyway, I figured it's a nice average of all the versions.
I cut the bottom of the Delton boiler open so it fit over the LGB motor block, and extended the smokebox by carefully cutting the smokebox door off with a razor saw, then inserting a small length of 2" OD acrylic tube. The seam is filled with plumber's putty to blend the two together. Number 1's smokebox front wasn't quite this ornate, and this may change before I paint it. I saw some Trackside Details smokebox doors the other day that might work well instead. We'll see. I'm not sure I want to risk destroying what's there. I sanded down the Delton cast-on boiler bands to a more scale appearance. My original intent was to sand them completely off then add new ones, but in sanding them down, I found I could work them to where I needed them. 
My only gripe with the LGB chassis is that it's a big box of plastic, not the spidery open frame of an early mogul. This wasn’t so much an issue under the boiler, as the fenders would take mask that part, but at the front and rear, things had to be cut away. Some work with a Roto-Zip bit in my drill press made quick work of opening up the frame. The trade-off is that the motor block is no longer sealed, so dirt and crap could work its way back in. Right now, I’ve got a piece of wood filling in the space. This may or may not change. The fenders are bent from brass, and screwed into the frame. The LGB plastic is notoriously resistant to glue, so I used mechanical fasteners wherever possible. 
I went back and forth about the LGB cylinders. It would have been very easy to use them, but they were too long and the crosshead was the wrong style. If I didn’t have the aforementioned Delton bits lying around, I would have let it go, but every time I looked at those cylinders versus the LGB ones, a change had to be made. So, I cut off the LGB cylinders, and replaced them with the Delton ones, which not only matched the prototype, but also had the correct style crosshead. The guides were too short, so I fabricated some new ones from brass and styrene. The top and front of the brass is covered in aluminum tape to give it the look of polished steel, so I don’t have to rely on paint for that. I might replace the piston rods with steel, we’ll see. I did have to lengthen the main rod a bit so the stock LGB rod could attach to the new crosshead. I cut and spliced the two rods together (coincidentally the same cross-section) and then reinforced the joint with 0-80 screws, which I threaded into the rod, then cut the heads off of. The result is a very strong joint. I used the original LGB crosshead guide rear supports, but removed as much as possible extra material. 
The plumbing on this locomotive is interesting, and also seems to have changed over time. On the engineer’s side, there’s both an injector and a crosshead pump. Originally, the locomotive had crosshead pumps on both sides. I don’t know if the injector is original, though I suspect it would have been. When the locomotive was reboilered, they stayed with only one injector, and removed the fireman’s side crosshead pump. I guess as long as you’ve got two ways of getting water into the boiler, you’re fine. So, I modeled the injector/crosshead pump arrangement on the engineer’s side, and left the fireman’s side empty. The plumbing is a mixture of Bachmann valves, a modified Trackside Details crosshead pump, and lots of brass wire. The reverse lever also reaches forward from the cab. It “pivots” from the bottom of the frame below the cab, but is non-functional. You can see the steam turret behind the steam dome which serves as the take-off for the steam heat line. 
Here’s a closer look at the modified Trackside Details crosshead injector. 
In another serendipitous development, I had an old Bachmann 4-4-0 cab sitting in the parts box which was virtually a dead ringer for the prototype. It fit almost perfectly across the Delton boiler, but needed some space filled in with extra styrene. I raised the cab windows to match the prototype, and that’s all that needed doing. I sacrificed the front doors being able to open, but I can live with that. 
I usually don’t go hog-wild with cab detailing, but the combination of large cab windows and a very simple locomotive made things just too hard to resist. It may not be 100% accurate, but it’s pretty accurate for what likely existed. I took inspiration from Fletch’s Baldwin Mogul masterclass.

The cowcatcher is cut down from the LGB cowcatcher. I removed the center 4 vertical supports, and screwed it to a new wood top piece. A coupler lift bar, Trackside Details pocket, and Kadee coupler complete the pilot. The flat holders are 3/32” copper tube. 
The tender rode on this funky 3-axle arrangement, with the front axle being fixed to the frame, the rear two being on a truck. I don’t know how common this was, nor if EBT#2 had the same arrangement, but it is most decidedly distinctive. 
The front journals are Ozark Miniatures castings, supplemented with brass strap. The rear truck is from the LGB tender, with brake shoes from a Bachmann 1:20 flat car truck. (I shortened them to match the smaller wheelbase). The wheels are actually a bit smaller diameter than what the prototype supposedly had, but I couldn’t get the needed swing with using scale wheels. 




From here, it’s off to the paint shop, which will have to wait until the weather is a bit more consistently warmer. I paint in my garage, and I prefer it to be well into the 60s for good coverage. In the mean time, I’ve got plenty of other projects to keep me busy.>>


K
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
5,120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

Colors? I'm leaning towards something along these lines:



though not quite so green as illustrated here. Something more along the lines of PRR Brunswick green or thereabouts. Green enough not to be black, but not not too green, either. I'm not totally convinced yet, as I'm still trying to iron out exactly what the EBT was doing around this time in terms of painting locos. Around the turn of the century, they were ordering their locos in black with aluminum striping and lettering, but changed to Baldwin's olive paint with aluminum lettering shortly after. This loco would not have been painted by Baldwin when it was reboilered in 1905, but logic states that they would have followed the going practice at the time when repainting it.

As for batteries, I'm going to experiment with LiIon batteries in this one, so there should be ample room. I may put sound in this one, but if Bruce can squeeze everything needed inside the body of his M-3 model, this tender will be a breeze!

Later,

K
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
5,120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

Does anyone have a bottle/can of Floquil's or Scalecoat's Pullman Green and Brunswick Green lying around to give me a comparison of the two colors side by side? I'm looking for the "perfect" shade of green, and I what I remember Floquil's Pullman green being seems to my memory to be just a bit too light for what I'm after. I think Brunswick Green would be better, but Floquil's web site isn't terribly helpful in terms of determining the color.

Later,

K
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
5,120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

The insulation is first aid tape. It's actually a bit thicker than what I'd like, so I'll probably redo it before all is said and done. Most likely, I'll pull it off before I paint the loco, then reapply it afterwards, so I don't have to repaint it to look like it does now. I'll then just weather it a bit with powders to tone it down a bit.

Later,

K
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
5,120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

EBT #1, the "Edward Roberts" has finally emerged from the paint shop!



The locomotive is painted as I suspect she would have looked c. 1911, right around the end of her service on the EBT. She got a new boiler and paint job in 1905 (see photo on the first page), and spent a few years pulling the president's business car. In 1908, when the EBT's 2-6-2 (#11) arrived, she took on those duties, so #1 likely went back to her home in the Rockhill Furnace roundhouse, and saw little use from that point on. In 1911, she was leased to the Tuscarora Valley Railroad, being sold outright to them 2 years later. Since I model c. 1912 (give or take a year), I figured this "transition" paint would be perfect.

After doing some digging, I discovered that from 1908 forward, the EBT ordered all their locomotives with Baldwin's standard Olive Green paint with orange lettering. I believe #1 as rebuilt was the first to wear such a paint scheme, though rebuilt by the EBT's shops, not Baldwin. So, I used that as a guide.



The green is Badger/Accuflex "Seaboard Airline Pullman Green." I tried a number of different brands of paints before I found a color of olive green that I liked. Not all companies' like-named colors are the same. The boiler is painted with Testors/Model Masters "buffable Gunmetal." The smokebox is Folk Art's basic black. I was very impressed with the Badger/Accuflex paint. It airbrushed like a dream, which considering my love/hate relationship with my airbrush is saying something. It also went on with a brush very smoothly. I was originally thinking I'd have to airbrush everything, but in reality, I had to paint only the tender tank with the airbrush. Everything else was done with a regular brush.



The lettering is custom dry transfers I had done. The orange used by the EBT can't be replicated cleanly on an ALPS printer without running through a ton of orange, red, and white ribbon, and a friend had put me in touch with a print shop in Vancouver who does dry transfers. The lettering itself is larger than what was on the prototype's tender, but it's the same size as what was used on the mikados. The color is a shade lighter than what I would find ideal, but when you're color matching over the internet, you have to expect there to be a few hiccups. Fortunately, weathering the sides with a wash of dilute black paint toned the lettering down perfectly. Since most everything on the EBT had a fairly heavy layer of coal dust on it anyway, this wasn't an issue.



I wanted the frame and the solid LGB motor block to be hidden in the shadows, so I painted it flat black, while running the locomotive so the paint got behind the wheels. I then went back and brush-painted the wheels with the green paint. I neglected to do my usual trick of spreading vaseline on the treads, so the paint is still rather caked on. I'll probably just let nature take its course there. The crosshead water pump is painted with gold paint. The siderods have gold paint on the pertinent brass details, and is washed with dilute black and brown paint to simulate dirt, soot, and rust.



I wanted to give this loco the look of a locomotive that was in storage for a while, and brought out to fill a need. As such, I wanted this one to be a bit "dirtier" than I usually weather locos. Some dilute black paint was washed over the top of the boiler to simulate a layer of soot, while some dilute tan paint around the top of the sand dome gives a hint of what's contained therein. I can't confirm whether the locomotive had a number on the sand dome or not, but I thought it balanced the look of the locomotive, so I put one there.



The tender spigot got some gold highlights where paint would have been worn off through normal use and abuse.



The two injectors on the engineer's side. The forward one is from the crosshead, the rear one is a steam-powered injector. There are no injectors on the fireman's side. The builder's plate is from a Delton C-16, who gave its boiler and smokebox (and cylinders and front pilot deck) to this project. I had proper Baldwin builder's plates from Trackside Details, but they were too small to fit in the molded-in indentation in the smokebox. The date's a bit off, but that's what weathering's for. Actually, when the loco was reboilered, the builder's plates were never reinstalled, so technically they shouldn't be there. I was going to putty in the indentations, but forgot to do so until after it was painted. Besides, I like builder's plates.



Some more weathering on the steam dome--hard water stains and some wear on the side of the steam dome where the bell rope would rub against it. The rope is stripped stranded wire painted tan and washed with dilute black paint.



The windows were brushed with Badger/Accuflex matte finish, then scrubbed clean with a Q-tip in the center to give the look of a cleaned window. The running boards were painted black, then sanded down to expose the original wood, then painted with dilute black paint to grey the wood a bit.



The cab is as detailed as I've ever done. Usually I don't fiddle with such things to the extent as I did here, but I figured why not? The bell and whistle ropes extend to the rear cab wall. I had mentioned that I was going to remove the insulating tape prior to painting. I didn't. So, I painted it beige and weathered it. I still need to put proper dial faces on the pressure gauges. The window glazing is held in place with two-sided tape. It's removable if I need to paint again, and very easy to apply. I think I'll be using that technique a lot more.



The back side of the tender, showing the steam-heat connection. #1 was fitted with a steam heat supply specifically for the EBT's business car--at the time the only car on the railroad with steam heat.



Here's a comparison between this and the Bachmann 4-4-0, a locomotive that was built just a few years after this one was.



And from above... The cabs are identical, as are the headlights. I did replace the LED in the headlight with a off-white LED.

Finally, some random views of the loco:









It's rather fitting that this is EBT #1, as this is the first true EBT prototype locomotive on my roster. I'm currently working on a model of EBT #3, a 2-8-0, which is in its VERY nascent stages. It's going to be next winter's project. At some point, Accucraft will deliver my #12, which will get stripped and repainted in this same olive green paint since that's how it was delivered.

I'm waiting for my battery and charger to arrive, so I can install the control. I'm not planning on adding sound at the moment, so I'm putting a big honkin' 4400mAh battery in the tender (Thanks, Stan, for the link!)

Once that arrives, I'll post photos of the loco out stretching its legs.

Later,

K
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
5,120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

But--and I hate to say this--shouldn't the bell be weathered a little?


Yes, it should. I didn't weather it because I wanted the visual contrast on the top of the boiler, but in photos, it definitely looks a bit too clean. Should be an easy fix. I've got to dust up the steam heat hose, too. Somehow, it miraculously missed all the splashback from the wheels that hit the rear of the tender. No, it has nothing to do with the fact that I completely forgot to add the hose until after I weathered the tender. ;)

Later,

K
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
5,120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #38 ·
RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

Where did you get the Baldwin number plate for the front of the loco?

It came with the old Delton kit from which I appropriated the boiler, smokebox, and cylinders. The smokebox had a circular indentation that was larger than the Trackside Details Baldwin builder's plate I wanted to use, and my next option was to fill it in. Since I forgot to do option 2 before I painted, I just use the Delton plates. The date's wrong (it says "1988") but with a little more weathering, I should be able to obscure that a bit more.

What type of paint did you use for your "thin wash of black" weathering? Is it water-based, and if so, do you have any trouble getting it to spread evenly without beading up?

I use the "Folk Art" brand of acrylic paints that you can find at most hobby/craft stores. It's water based, and thins very nicely. The thinner the wash, the more transparent the coating. The nice thing, too, is that you can let gravity do your "dirty" work, as the streaks streak and pool as they would on the prototype. It does have a tendency to bead up occasionally, if the wash is too thin. When that happens, I just swab the area with a bit of thicker paint, then swab again with more water. The thicker paint ends up binding to the surface where the water didn't, and pretty much eliminates the beading.

For most surfaces, I use a flat black with varying degrees of brown mixed in. For the soot along the top, it's mostly flat black. Along the wheels, it's a bit more brownish. I've not had a lot of luck with light washes (dust, etc.), so I tend to use powders or an airbrush for those. Since that kind of dusting is often more of an overall, even application, those techniques work well. The washes can be much more controlled in their application.

Later,

K
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top