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If ever there was a chameleon locomotive on the EBT's roster, #1 was it. It was one of the first two locos on the EBT, having been built in 1873 to the same drawings as the D&RGW's "Sho-wa-no" 2-6-0. (See David Fletcher's version on his web site). In researching the loco, I found no fewer than 6 variations--different pilots, domes, no extended smokebox, extended smokebox, then an entirely new boiler altogether (All the Airplane fans just said "then an entirely new boiler"), running boards moved up and down; then when it was sold to the Tuscarora Valley in 1911, an air pump and yet another front pilot (with automatic coupler). 
Here's some examples: This is the earliest photo I came across, and is probably as close to her original appearance as possible. The original Baldwin ornate paint is barely visible on the tender. The second steam dome was added at some point by the railroad.




I've always wanted to build a model of this loco. There were two possibilities for starting points. Aster's original JNR mogul would provide me with what I needed for a live steam version--including the funky three-axle tender. Alas, I missed a chance to buy one at a very good price, and since it's slip-eccentric and runs on only one cylinder, wouldn't be a good fit for my kind of operation anyway. (That doesn't mean that--someday--I might get one and build #2, a twin to #1.) The other option was starting with an LGB mogul. The drivers are the right size, albeit spaced a few inches too far apart, and the tender is close-ish. (That's a technical term meaning "close enough to where the compromise is worth not dealing wtih the headache of scratchbuilding.") I recently acquired an LGB mogul, so I was finally able to start.
The LGB mogul is 1:22.5, so one would think it might scale well for a small 1:20 mogul. While this is largely the case, it's actually too large for this diminutive loco, so pretty much everything above the chassis went into the parts box. That left me with a chassis and tender tank as the only surviving parts. (The rest has since been sent on to another modeler.) What I didn't realize, though, was how much cleaner my parts box was going to get as a result of this project...
The locomotive ended up being somewhat of a "Frankenstein" locomotive. I was prepared for a healthy amount of scratchbuilding on this project, but soon discovered that going through such lengths wouldn't be as necessary as I had thought. I had in my parts box some old Delton C-16 kits that I had picked up for a song. Having now conclude that the drive in those units is pretty much worthless, what I had intended to do with those will now be done using the new Aristo version. This freed up these components for "experimentation." My first look went to the boiler and smokebox. It was the right diameter in 1:20, and had very nice looking domes. They are not in quite the same place as the prototype, but it was close-ish. Since the domes on this loco moved around anyway, I figured it's a nice average of all the versions.
I cut the bottom of the Delton boiler open so it fit over the LGB motor block, and extended the smokebox by carefully cutting the smokebox door off with a razor saw, then inserting a small length of 2" OD acrylic tube. The seam is filled with plumber's putty to blend the two together. Number 1's smokebox front wasn't quite this ornate, and this may change before I paint it. I saw some Trackside Details smokebox doors the other day that might work well instead. We'll see. I'm not sure I want to risk destroying what's there. I sanded down the Delton cast-on boiler bands to a more scale appearance. My original intent was to sand them completely off then add new ones, but in sanding them down, I found I could work them to where I needed them. 
My only gripe with the LGB chassis is that it's a big box of plastic, not the spidery open frame of an early mogul. This wasn’t so much an issue under the boiler, as the fenders would take mask that part, but at the front and rear, things had to be cut away. Some work with a Roto-Zip bit in my drill press made quick work of opening up the frame. The trade-off is that the motor block is no longer sealed, so dirt and crap could work its way back in. Right now, I’ve got a piece of wood filling in the space. This may or may not change. The fenders are bent from brass, and screwed into the frame. The LGB plastic is notoriously resistant to glue, so I used mechanical fasteners wherever possible. 
I went back and forth about the LGB cylinders. It would have been very easy to use them, but they were too long and the crosshead was the wrong style. If I didn’t have the aforementioned Delton bits lying around, I would have let it go, but every time I looked at those cylinders versus the LGB ones, a change had to be made. So, I cut off the LGB cylinders, and replaced them with the Delton ones, which not only matched the prototype, but also had the correct style crosshead. The guides were too short, so I fabricated some new ones from brass and styrene. The top and front of the brass is covered in aluminum tape to give it the look of polished steel, so I don’t have to rely on paint for that. I might replace the piston rods with steel, we’ll see. I did have to lengthen the main rod a bit so the stock LGB rod could attach to the new crosshead. I cut and spliced the two rods together (coincidentally the same cross-section) and then reinforced the joint with 0-80 screws, which I threaded into the rod, then cut the heads off of. The result is a very strong joint. I used the original LGB crosshead guide rear supports, but removed as much as possible extra material. 
The plumbing on this locomotive is interesting, and also seems to have changed over time. On the engineer’s side, there’s both an injector and a crosshead pump. Originally, the locomotive had crosshead pumps on both sides. I don’t know if the injector is original, though I suspect it would have been. When the locomotive was reboilered, they stayed with only one injector, and removed the fireman’s side crosshead pump. I guess as long as you’ve got two ways of getting water into the boiler, you’re fine. So, I modeled the injector/crosshead pump arrangement on the engineer’s side, and left the fireman’s side empty. The plumbing is a mixture of Bachmann valves, a modified Trackside Details crosshead pump, and lots of brass wire. The reverse lever also reaches forward from the cab. It “pivots” from the bottom of the frame below the cab, but is non-functional. You can see the steam turret behind the steam dome which serves as the take-off for the steam heat line. 
Here’s a closer look at the modified Trackside Details crosshead injector. 
In another serendipitous development, I had an old Bachmann 4-4-0 cab sitting in the parts box which was virtually a dead ringer for the prototype. It fit almost perfectly across the Delton boiler, but needed some space filled in with extra styrene. I raised the cab windows to match the prototype, and that’s all that needed doing. I sacrificed the front doors being able to open, but I can live with that. 
I usually don’t go hog-wild with cab detailing, but the combination of large cab windows and a very simple locomotive made things just too hard to resist. It may not be 100% accurate, but it’s pretty accurate for what likely existed. I took inspiration from Fletch’s Baldwin Mogul masterclass.

The cowcatcher is cut down from the LGB cowcatcher. I removed the center 4 vertical supports, and screwed it to a new wood top piece. A coupler lift bar, Trackside Details pocket, and Kadee coupler complete the pilot. The flat holders are 3/32” copper tube. 
The tender rode on this funky 3-axle arrangement, with the front axle being fixed to the frame, the rear two being on a truck. I don’t know how common this was, nor if EBT#2 had the same arrangement, but it is most decidedly distinctive. 
The front journals are Ozark Miniatures castings, supplemented with brass strap. The rear truck is from the LGB tender, with brake shoes from a Bachmann 1:20 flat car truck. (I shortened them to match the smaller wheelbase). The wheels are actually a bit smaller diameter than what the prototype supposedly had, but I couldn’t get the needed swing with using scale wheels. 




From here, it’s off to the paint shop, which will have to wait until the weather is a bit more consistently warmer. I paint in my garage, and I prefer it to be well into the 60s for good coverage. In the mean time, I’ve got plenty of other projects to keep me busy.>>


K
 

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Hi Kevin,


Fantastic work; that looks good!

I like the photos which are most helpful, and have been saved for future information.

What colors will it be painted please?
 

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Very nice Kevin, great use of a multitude of ready made bits and pieces to make something truly original.Looking forward to seeing it painted.
Regards
Bunny
 

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RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

Very nice. That's a neat use of the LGB Mogul, though who would have thought that you'd end up with something smaller. ;) Is there still room for batteries?
 

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RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

Very creative and a great looking model. Makes me wish the OR&L had something similar. If Ben would only turn around maybe he'd get one.

Jeff Livingston
Kaneohe, Hawaii
 

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Wonderful Kevin,
Fantastic. Now I can see the version yours is based on, with extended smokebox. The original version actually looks pretty stock Baldwin, as the D&RG versions to follow Shou-wa-no had the two steam domes as well, also slightly different drive wheel setout and valve setup. I think Shou-wa-no was a prototype for things to come.

The paint in that first photo is very much a Baldwin style - while this predates the style book, it looks to me to be typically Style 9, which was a classic Pennsylvania RR style from 1869. Their engines were a gloss black as-built with simple bands of colour on the domes in red cream and gold. The tender features a neat linework box on the sides and tender corners, made up of gold and cream linwork, no scrolls. There is a line at the upper and lower tank edge in cream with bands (or stiles) of Tuscan red above and below. This style was used by the Penn RR over 10 years, then the styling was updated - same colours and bands, just with simpler chamfers to the corners on the tender decoration. You'll find locos correctly restored to this style at Strasburg RR Museum today.

What a slick engine this would have been if gloss black was used on the NG loco. I've worked a lot with this style in recent months, as a whole host of Baldwin locos built for Australia used this exact same style from 1877-1885, abeit on dark Olive green base colour, instead of black.

Here is a glimpse of Style 9, Penn RR style of the 1870s on an old Accucraft 4-4-0 I built up from a kit. Note there should be gold rims to the dome rings and linework on the wheels too, but I never got round to that nightmare! This old Acc is a bit clunky as a runner!

David.
 

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RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

Kevin,

Very nice. Thanks for sharing.
 

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RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

Kevin, Great work as usual. Nice little loco, I especially like the 6 wheel tender. Really a unique loco! Thanks for posting.
 

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RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

Nice little loco, Kevin! That six-wheel tender design wasn't that uncommon on medium-sized locos. I wonder if the drawbar is part of the derailment problem? Can you fiddle with the hole size, up/down motion, etc., maybe?

I'm looking forward to seeing it painted!
 

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RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

Loved the historical perspective. And, of course, the loco. You have truly blossomed as a modeler and author.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

Colors? I'm leaning towards something along these lines:



though not quite so green as illustrated here. Something more along the lines of PRR Brunswick green or thereabouts. Green enough not to be black, but not not too green, either. I'm not totally convinced yet, as I'm still trying to iron out exactly what the EBT was doing around this time in terms of painting locos. Around the turn of the century, they were ordering their locos in black with aluminum striping and lettering, but changed to Baldwin's olive paint with aluminum lettering shortly after. This loco would not have been painted by Baldwin when it was reboilered in 1905, but logic states that they would have followed the going practice at the time when repainting it.

As for batteries, I'm going to experiment with LiIon batteries in this one, so there should be ample room. I may put sound in this one, but if Bruce can squeeze everything needed inside the body of his M-3 model, this tender will be a breeze!

Later,

K
 

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Posted By East Broad Top on 01/21/2009 1:43 AM

As for batteries, I'm going to experiment with LiIon batteries in this one, so there should be ample room. I may put sound in this one, but if Bruce can squeeze everything needed inside the body of his M-3 model, this tender will be a breeze!

Later,

K


Super job with this model. It's always a pleasure to see what comes out of the shops in Centennial. I think you'll be quite happy with the Li-ion's. I've been using them for quite some time in a number of different applications. If you have room for 4400 mah cells, I've found them to be better than a 2200. That's if you're going with 14.4 volt.

I'm sure you've researched them and their supply source but, I've switched my supply source to this site. 14.4 volt 4400 mah Li-ion

Will be awaiting the images of the paint and final details. :) :) :)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

Does anyone have a bottle/can of Floquil's or Scalecoat's Pullman Green and Brunswick Green lying around to give me a comparison of the two colors side by side? I'm looking for the "perfect" shade of green, and I what I remember Floquil's Pullman green being seems to my memory to be just a bit too light for what I'm after. I think Brunswick Green would be better, but Floquil's web site isn't terribly helpful in terms of determining the color.

Later,

K
 

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RE: EBT #1 "Edward Roberts"

Kevin, if you send me your home address off-line, I will spray Floquil Pullman green-from their spray can-on a card and mail it to you.
I do like small locos like this one--I'll refrain from calling this one a "critter".

Larry
 
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