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History


Okay, I know what you’re thinking… “Er, Kevin, that’s a Denver & Rio Grande locomotive. You’ve been spending too much time in the mountains again.” And after I turned a K-27 into Tuscarora RR #10, you’re really wondering if I’ve finally crossed over to “the dark side.” ‘Tis not the case. In fact, D&RG #13 never made it to Colorado. It was built in 1873 by Baldwin for the D&RG, but they refused it because it would have been too heavy for their rails. So, what’s a locomotive builder to do? Sell it to the next sucker who walks in the door. In this case, that happened to be the East Broad Top RR, which was in search of a locomotive that was more powerful than their diminutive moguls which they were using to build the line. So, Baldwin, sensing an easy sale, sold them this ready-made locomotive. All Baldwin had to do was repaint and rename it.

It proved to be very successful on the railroad, capable of pulling 15 loaded hoppers (9-ton capacity) over the railroad. The EBT ordered two additional locomotives the following year (#4 – Cromwell, and #5 – Shirley).



Number 3 would serve the railroad at least through 1897, which is the last time I see it specifically mentioned in any operations report. It was leased—then sold—to the Tuscarora Valley RR in 1911 along with EBT #1. Shortly after arriving on the TVRR, #3 is reported to have blown a cylinder, and that was pretty much her finale.

The above two photos are the only two photos of EBT #3 that have come to light. There are some differences between the two, reflecting changes made over the years. The smokebox was extended in the early 1890s (about the time the second photo was taken). The cab was replaced at some point; the new cab having a bit simpler wood panel sides as opposed to the rather fancy oval insets of the original cab. (Records indicate #3 was in a wreck in the 1880s, which could easily explain the need for a new cab.) The running boards got moved up higher on the boiler. This could have been the result of a wreck, or it could have been out of necessity—it’s a bit of a stretch for an average-sized person to stand on the lower boards and reach the top of the two domes. Most interesting (to me, at least) is that the drivers have all been changed. The shape of the counterweights is different. I don’t know when this might have happened.

The Model


I’ve always liked the EBT’s consolidations. Perhaps I’m most fond of #7, which was built to the same drawings as the D&RG’s C-19 class. Alas, there’s just enough different between the EBT and D&RG versions to where converting the Accucraft C-19 to an EBT loco would require enough cosmetic surgery to where I’d have a hard time justifying the price to the CFO after much would be sitting in my scrap box. It’s still on my “someday” list, if ever I find one in need of some TLC. (Preferably live steam.) But I digress…

The earlier 2-8-0s are equally graceful locomotives, and when I acquired a Barry’s Big Trains 2-8-0 chassis (attached to a B’mann “annie” at the time), I quickly compared it to the EBT’s early consolidations.


The drivers were the right diameter, at a scale 40”. They are spaced a bit too close together, but in weighing living with that compromise vs. having to build my own chassis and valve gear, I can live with that compromise. Barry’s chassis is bulletproof, so I know I’ll have decades of good service from the locomotive.

Most everything above the drivers would come from a Bachmann 2-6-0. The boiler diameter is the same, and while the prototype was a bit longer (to match the wheelbase), the B’mann boiler matches the shorter wheelbase very nicely. I did lengthen the firebox, but everything forward of the cab is the same.


The only thing that survived from the original 4-6-0 that came with the chassis was the front pilot. I needed something a bit more “modern” than the long link-and-pin cowcatcher, and the 2-6-0’s chassis was earmarked for TRR #2. I did shorten the front a bit from what was on Barry’s chassis originally.


The cylinders came from a Delton C-16, the crosshead and crosshead guides from an LGB mogul. I’m a big fan of using what’s available instead of building from scratch where I can.


The cab had to be raised up a bit, and an extension put along the bottom edge. The wood trim is dollhouse crown molding, and is very close to the trim on the stock Bachmann cab. I used aluminum tape to cover the holes I filled on the boiler, and knocked it a bit with a hammer and other things to give it a “well loved” appearance. Aluminum tape panels cover the roof of the cab, too.


I cut about 1” off the back of the BBT chassis, since it was pretty much just dead space. I also replaced the two center blind drivers. Barry uses the stock Bachmann wheels for this chassis, and the blind drivers are smaller in diameter than the flanged ones. As a result, they sit up above the railhead by close to 1/16”. That wasn’t going to cut it, so I chucked some surplus Bachmann drivers in my lathe, turned the flanges down, and put them on instead. They still sit a bit above the rails, but only by a few thousandths. The counterweights are cut from styrene, and glued over the stock B’mann counterweights.


The paint on the locomotive is purely conjectural, based on what the EBT was doing with other locos in the time period I’m modeling. Number 3 came to the railroad in black paint with what’s believed to be gold and green trim. It would presumably have been repainted over its service on the EBT, most likely following its wreck. How it was painted is really anyone’s guess, but most likely in line with other contemporary EBT locos, which at the time were either olive (dark green) with silver (“aluminum”) lettering or black with aluminum lettering. Assuming #3 was semi-retired by the turn of the 20th century, it’s unlikely she ever wore the familiar orange “E.B.T.” on the tender which came into vogue around 1908. However, many of my other locos (Tuscarora RR and Tuscarora Valley RR) are black with silver lettering, and quite frankly I liked the look of the orange on the dark green. I had used that on EBT #1, so it made sense that #3 could plausibly be painted the same. If anyone has photographic evidence to the contrary, I welcome it!


The fireman’s side of the loco. It’s noticeably sparse compared to “modern” steam locomotives, but from everything I’ve read, this loco was pretty simple. It had a single injector on the engineer’s side, combined with a crosshead pump. No engine brakes, it used steam for braking. You’d close the throttle, open the cylinder cocks, put the locomotive in reverse, then open the throttle to apply back pressure to the cylinders. (This is probably how the cylinder got blown out on the TVRR, because if you forgot to open the cylinder cocks, that would happen.) So long as your trains were short, that was generally sufficient to stop the train (along with brakemen setting brakes on the train).


The smokebox was extended with some 2” acrylic tubing that I wrapped in embossed styrene to match the diameter of the stock firebox. The smokestack is 5/8” brass tubing, capped with the cap off of a B’mann 4-6-0 (Thanks, Jon!) The headlight is from a B’mann Shay. Domes, bell, and handrails didn’t change.


The cylinders and whatnots, painted. I left the side rods unpainted, but had to paint the main rod from the cylinders. It’s not the best match, but with everything else there, it’s not that noticeable. I may try again to match it better, but we’ll see.


The cab extension turned out pretty darned good. It’s kind of a combination of both styles of cab that were on the locomotive; squared panels with heavy ornamentation. I wasn’t in the mood to build new cab sides unless I had to. The green is ModelFlex “Seaboard Air Lines Pullman Green.” The boiler jacket is Testors’ Metalizer Buffable “Gunmetal.” I’ve used this on four locomotives now, and each time I use it, I like it more and more. The green interior is just a generic green acrylic paint.


The tender is pretty much left untouched. There is a photo of #3’s tender sitting behind a derelict ex-EBT #1 taken in the 30s, and it matches very closely to the Bachmann 2-6-0 tender, so I didn’t do anything to it beyond a new coal load (which lifts off to access the removable battery).


Weathering was done with my usual mix of dilute black and brownish washes, followed by Bragdon’s powders. I sprinkled around some coal dust here and there, too. To apply this, I just brushed on some dilute white glue into the corners, dusted on some coal dust, and left it to dry. The coupler is an AMS 1:32 coupler, which scales out well for the 3/4 sized couplers used by the EBT (and other narrow gauge lines).


The engineer started out as a Tamiya 1:20 racing crew figure “kit.” You get a head and torso, and the arms and legs are separate. This makes it a bit easier to cut and fit to specific situations. In the case of #3, there’s not a lot of room between the side of the cab and the firebox. I’ve seen engineers sitting on the window sill on the prototypes, so I figured this would be a great chance to have my engineer do the same. It’s hard to see his head from anything but a low angle, but that’s why I have the door open. To match his bottom to the armrest, I coated his leg with Sculpey (which I had to do anyway since the original figure was wearing shorts), and smushed it down on the rest to get it to shape.

One quick tip with working with Sculpey this time ‘round: my toaster oven died a while ago, so I didn’t have an oven to “bake” the sculpey. (I didn’t want to turn on the big oven.) So, I grabbed my heat gun and just blew hot air on the Sculpey for a few minutes to get it to temperature. Worked like a charm. Because the figure is plastic, I had to be a bit careful not to melt the plastic, but I was also able to soften some joints and move hands, feet, etc.


The “other half” of the engineer, showing the semi-detailed cab interior. I didn’t go too nuts here, I just wanted to hint at a cab interior. I didn’t notice until I looked at the photo, but I missed a few spots when painting. Oops. Gotta get those…


Here’s the front of the tender, with the requisite “junk” within arm’s reach of the fireman (who’s taking a quick breather from shoveling.) The fireman is actually a demoted conductor. I don’t know who made him; I got him from one of the vendors at the Narrow Gauge Convention. Shoulda bought more… I reshaped his conductor’s hat to more of an engineer’s cap shape, and ground away his tie to give him a less formal look. He scales to about 5’ 10”, so you can get a feel for how small that tender really is.


Here’s #3 and #1 next to each other. I wish the size difference showed up better. Number 3 is a “small” locomotive, and it makes #1 look even smaller.

Number 3 has already proven to be a very smooth running locomotive. It’s capable of some very low speeds, and will likely become a regular site on the TRR’s trains.

Later,

K
 

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Discussion Starter #2
(Sorry about the weird HTML coding bits. I typed this in Word, then cut/pasted it into the editor. Somehow a bunch of extra stuff got added. (My Firefox randomly crashes on me, so typing long posts gets risky.)

Anyway, things I forgot to mention...

Counterweights--they're cut from styrene sheet and glued onto the existing counterweights on the wheels. I've got a sharp pair of dividers that I used to scribe the concentric circles, and just cut them out, two counterweights per circle.

Running Boards--By the 1890s, the locomotive had running boards mounted higher than how they came from Baldwin, but I modeled them as delivered, despite my time period being early 1910s. The reason for this is really one of aesthetics. The prototype loco's drivers are spaced farther apart than the model, and they have fenders over each of the drivers. The BBT chassis didn't afford me the space between the drivers for the fenders, so I had to leave them off. As a result of that, when I put the running boards to their later height, the locomotive just looked a bit odd between the drivers and the running boards. That went away when I moved the running boards back down to the "as delivered" arrangement. So, I opted to keep them low.

Later,

K
 

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Very nice as usual Kevin,love the injector/pump on the crosshead makes a good unusual feature.With all the additions to your loco rosta you will soon need a larger layout!!
Regards
David
 

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Kevin,
I'm getting a really big kick out of seeing what you are doing to bash a fleet of EBT rolling stock! (Of course, it's a beauty as usual!) How many engines does this make now?
 

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Kevin, I hate you and your wonderful locos. :)
Beautiful job as always, you're an inspiration.
 

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Kevin,

You inspire the rest of us. Fantastic model with so much detail! And I really like your scale figures. After seeing the engineer sitting on the window sill, I can now see why South Pacific Coast cut down the rear windows on consolidation #13 to allow him to lean out and see better!

Keep up the good work.

Best regards,

Alan
 

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Thanks, guys!

Steve, in terms of models of specific EBT prototype locos, this is my second in 1:20.3. (I had built #7, 11, and 3rd #2 in 1:24). In terms of locos currently in service on the TRR (including Tuscarora Valley and EBT prototypes in addition to the freelanced TRR locos) there are 10. (I think that gives me one loco for every two cars or something like that...)

At this point, I think I'm going to "stick" to building models of specific EBT prototypes now that I've got a reliable stable built up. The lone exception would probably be TRR #3, which is my B'mann consolidation, currently with a plannished iron jacket and dark walnut cab. If I ever find a really good deal on another 2-8-0, I think I'll "modernize" it as I did TRR #2. On the other hand, I'd have to plumb another dual airpump set, which I'm not too excited about doing. Next up will be a quick rebuild of a Bachmann 0-4-0 saddle tanker into EBT 3rd #2 (in "proper" 1:20.3), then EBT 2nd #5, which is one of their "large" 2-6-0s. I've also got 2-6-2 #11 in the planning stages and then I'll probably do one of their 4-6-0s, though I don't know which one yet. That's down the road a ways. Those are going to be much more scratchbuilt than being able to use bits and pieces from commercial locos. (And #7 in live steam, should the opportunity present itself.) I don't think I'll ever have another winter season where I turn out three new locomotives for the railroad.

Of course, that's subject to change based on whim...

Later,

K
 

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Lovely work, Kevin. I think your attention to the "little" details like lubrication lines, lift bars, spilled coal give the models an impressive level of realism. It's a shame that the figures available to us are still so cartoon-like - with realistic figures on it, you could pass this as a prototype.
 

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Great narrative and photos, Kevin. I'm inspired try one of your techniques every time I read your posts. Did you paint the boiler with a brush?

Jim
 

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I'd have to plumb another dual airpump
There's a pair on my EBT #7 C-19 that are about the become victims of a back-dating exercise. If you can wait until I get up the nerve to pul the boiler out to get at the screws inside. I already have the domes waiting for the dismantling day . . . Unless you'd like to do it for me ?
 

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It's a shame that the figures available to us are still so cartoon-like
Unfortunately, it's the nature of painted figures that they look, well, painted. (And I'm nowhere near as skilled as I'd like to be in that arena.) I agree that many figures do have rather caricaturish features, but I'm quite particular about that myself (An aesthetic sense instilled by my dad, which seems ironic considering he sculpts cartoon characters.) The Tamaya figures are very realistic. The only problem is that they're wearing shorts and T-shirts (kind of odd for a racing crew), so you've got to give them some proper attire with Sculpey. I must admit the fireman looks a bit like Peter Sellers, who was quite cartoon-like in his own right. (And yes, I am worried that Inspector Cluseau is firing my locomotive.)

Did you paint the boiler with a brush?
No, it's a spray can. There's two parts--the paint, which you spray on then buff with a cotton wheel in the Dremel tool (the one that looks like a bunch of cotton cloth disks sewn together, not the one that looks like a stiff cotton ball), then a clearcoat, which is also sprayed on after you buff the paint. I don't know if Krylon or any gloss coat would work, I've always just used their stuff. You don't "need" the clear coat, but I think it does give it just a bit of extra depth.

Unless you'd like to do it for me ?
Sure, but please note that any live steam locomotive model of #7 will have to undergo a very rigorous battery of operational tests to make absolutely sure everything works as it should before I let it leave the shops. That process has been known to take years, if not decades. ;) I will be happy to give the sacrificed airpumps a proper new home. You gonna be at the Reunion in the fall?

Later,

K
 

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live steam locomotive model of #7 will have to undergo a very rigorous battery of operational tests
Video (on the Dr Rivet Meet thread) shows it works very well - no additional tests needed imho.
 

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Ah, but that's before the cosmetic makeover. Things change...

Seriously--they do change. I had an old Creekside Baldwin 0-4-0 saddle tank that I had running like a fine Swiss watch. I took it into the workshop, built a new cab for it, and put a new front and rear pilot beam a la 3rd #2, and the thing never steamed right again. I did nothing to the mechanics of it. Weirdest thing I've ever encountered. It ran great on air, but the boiler wouldn't maintain steam for love or money. (And after hearing that, I know you're even more convinced to send me your #7...)

Later,

K
 
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